Rotary Club of Faribault

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Meeting Responsibilities
Club Services
Attendance/Greeter
Kniefel, Keith
 
Attendance/Greeter
Staab-Absher, Erica
 
Fellowship
Hanson, Murray
 
Sergeant At Arms
DeMars, Brenda
 
 

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Welcome - Join us at our weekly meeting!

Join us at Rotary!

Faribault

Rotary connects the World!

We meet Wednesdays at 12:15 PM
Inn at Shattuck- St. Mary's
1000 Shumway Ave.
Faribault, MN  55021
United States of America
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Home Page Stories
In just 16 weeks, the Faribault Rotary Club will celebrate its 100-year anniversary on May 1, 2020.  This week’s historical highlight is from 1999.
 
An anonymous Rotarian donated $500 and asked for matching donations for the Special Olympics.
The club delivered 406 meals during its two weeks turn with Meals on Wheels in January.
Local Golf Pro, Ken Gorg, spoke to the club about the developments of golf in general and how golf came to Faribault in 1910.
The club did an exceptional performance of Row, Row, Row your Boat during fellowship.
A group of Rotarians from Mongolia presented a program about their country.
The club presented the annual Honors Banquet and he second annual STRIVE Banquet two weeks apart in May.
The annual picnic and auction were held at the Rotary Camp.
Former Governor Al Quie spoke to the club.
Don Lucia, the new head coach of the Minnesota Gophers Hockey team and Rod Mahler’s nephew, spoke to the club about his goals and plans for the team.
Jeanine Sahagian sold 200 dozen roses during the annual sale.
The 60th Annual Christmas Concert was held at Shattuck-St. Mary’s.
 
Our club’s 79th president in 1998-99 was Pastor Gordon Orde.

Advanced Care Planning

       On Wednesday January 8th we hear from Pat Heydon of Honoring Choices MN. This is a grant funded program operating out of Allina Health Faribault and Owatonna. Honoring Choices is a program designed to get people talking about their health care directive, and help all clients complete a new and accurate health care directive at no cost. Pat will meet with you individually, or in a group, over a meal, or at your home, anywhere you like, and with as many people you want to get together, to start the conversation and assist you with completed your own Honoring Choices document.
       For more information on Honoring Choices please contact Pat at honoringchoices@allina.com or by calling 507-977-2330. She is urging everyone to have this conversation with loved ones, and to complete the process themselves.
       Thank you, Pat, for making a very heavy topic light and a little funny. We look forward to seeing you around town!
 
 
In just 17 weeks, the Faribault Rotary Club will celebrate its 100-year anniversary on May 1, 2020.  This week’s historical highlight is from 1998.
 
Donn Johnson led a program entitled “A Look into the Crystal Ball at Faribault’s Future.”
In the first year of the STRIVE Program, the club awarded $3000 In scholarships to students.
Dr. Michael Richie presented a program on the advances in Refractive surgery.
The Annual Honors Banquet was held at South Central College and Brent Peroutka was one of the seniors being honored.
Club dues were set at $150 for the year.
There were programs discussing the economic importance of the Faribault Airport and the festivities involving the Hot Air Balloon Rally and the Tree Frog Music Festival.
Sheriff’s Deputy Dan Silkey presented a talk on Rice County Gang Suppression.
Rotarian Harley Pettipiece gave a program on his family’s past and how his family farm is now the site of Perkins Restaurant.
The 59th Annual Rotary Christmas Concert was held at Shattuck-St. Mary’s.
 
Our club’s 78th president in 1997-98 was Wade Karli.
 
Did you know that the Rotary Club of Reno, NV is farther west than the Rotary Club of Los Angeles, CA?

Presidential message

2019-20 RI President Mark Daniel Maloney

Mark Daniel Maloney

President 2019-20

January 2020

People from all over the world have multiple reasons for joining Rotary. Many new Rotarians each year join for the same reason I did — because Rotary is a great way to benefit your career. When I was a new attorney starting out in Alabama, Gay and I became partners in her father's firm. He instilled in us the value of joining Rotary as a way to build relationships and demonstrate to potential clients that we were serious professionals who held firm to values even more robust than what our profession required.

Rotary's commitment to vocational service is built on the highest ethical standards in business and professions, the recognition of the worthiness of all useful work, and the dignifying of each Rotarian's occupation as an opportunity to serve society. That last point is so important. No matter our profession, we all contribute mightily to the world when we conduct our work with integrity and always adhere to The Four-Way Test.

I have made balancing the demands of Rotary with professional and family commitments one of my priorities as president. No Rotarian should feel pressured to put in more time than a volunteer position should ever demand. This is true for several reasons, one of them being that the work we do in our day jobs is just as important to Rotary as the work we do in the organization. We carry our Rotary values everywhere, and our professional success helps build a case for Rotary every day we go into the office.

This is particularly important in our efforts to reach younger new members. We want to see a Rotary where no one is ever asked to choose between being a good Rotarian and being a good parent, business owner, manager, or employee. When we ask busy young people to join us, we should not be asking them to give up their time and freedom. We should be rewarding them with an experience that makes everything they already do even more inspiring.

Providing greater balance within Rotary will have another benefit as well: It will create opportunities for other Rotarians, including Rotaractors, to step up and take a leadership role on projects and committees. This will ensure that they remain engaged in our clubs and inspired to be Rotarians for life.

Throughout the world, Rotary is admired for its vocational service and for the time-honored values we instill in all business relationships. As we continue our work to grow Rotary, let us remember that vocational service remains a crucial selling point to potential members.

Rotary Connects the World, and by making Rotary's vocational service work known to people in more professions and at different stages of their careers, we will help grow our organization and make it stronger and more diverse.

In just 20 weeks, the Faribault Rotary Club will celebrate its 100-year anniversary on May 1, 2020.  This week’s historical highlight is from 1997.
 
Rotarian Dr. Roy Anderson gave a presentation on his book called “The not so Straight River.”
Jerry Bell, President of the Minnesota Twins, gave a presentation to the club about what makes a successful sports franchise and the proposal for the new Twins stadium.
Palmer Dragsten was honored for 50 years of service and Al Burkhartzmeyer was honored for 40 years of service in Rotary.
The annual Honors Banquet was cancelled due to school construction.
Rotarian Marv Schrader presented the goals for Vocational Services which included the plans for the STRIVE program.
Nate Gagnon, son of Rotarian Tom and Linda Gagnon returned from being a Rotary Exchange and presented a very interesting program to the club.
Rotarian past president Kevin Mahoney spoke to the club about his trip to Israel organized by the American-Israel Chamber of Commerce.
The 58th Annual Christmas Concert was held at Trinity Lutheran Church.
 
Our club’s 77th president in 1996-97 was Don Olson.
ScholarshipFaribaultFall2019-112.jpg
Congratulations David Mesta on your Rotary Scholarship Award at South Central College!  David is pictured here with Faribault Rotary Club President Amy Amundson.

(reprinted with permission from the Faribault Daily News)

Faribault Rotarian Richard “Dick” Huston has traveled around the globe, but he called his most recent trip to Pakistan the most challenging of his life — both physically and emotionally.

After spending the week of Nov. 11-17 in Karachi, Pakistan, which has a population twice the size of New York City, Huston returned to Faribault eager to share his experience. In fact, Pakistani campaigners declared spreading awareness one of Huston’s primary roles for their cause.

“I hadn’t been there, and I just think we need to help people,” said Huston on his reasons for taking the trip. “I want to tell their story and encourage others to help them, also.”

As part of Rotary PolioPlus services, Huston expected representatives of other Rotary clubs to join his effort to learn about the endemic in Pakistan. He previously took a trip to Sierra Leone with a group of six Rotarians, but much to his surprise, Huston was the lone American to join the Karachi, Pakistan, polio campaign.

Huston admitted being the only American “felt a little weird” at first, but after a while he joked that being the only guest “felt pretty darn good.”

“Everywhere we went, people were so nice and gracious,” said Huston.

          Eradicating polio

PolioPlus is a four-pronged worldwide effort to eliminate polio with vaccinations. Huston explained the four purposes of the cause include preventing the disease, providing clean water, creating jobs and improving healthcare.

Polio once impacted 125 countries, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but the vaccination of millions of children since the 1980s has reduced the number of impacted countries down to three: Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nigeria. In the 1988, there were 350,000 cases of polio reported worldwide.

Houston said eradicating polio in Pakistan and Afghanistan is more difficult because people travel back and forth across the bordering countries often. According to UNICEF, polio cases in Pakistan have decreased from 20,000 per year in the early 1990s to just eight in 2018 since Pakistan’s Polio Eradication Programme launched in 1994.

Primarily a disease of children, Huston explained the symptoms of leg and/or arm paralysis indicate the first symptoms of polio. If the lungs experience paralysis, the disease can be fatal.

While overseas, Huston visited five sites where nurses vaccinated children for polio. The process, he said, was a matter of putting two drops of liquid vaccine on the tongue. But in the city of Karachi, which has approximately 15.4 million people, identifying all children under 5 who need vaccinations is a tremendous undertaking for nurses and aid workers.

Huston explained that a lot of negative propaganda makes mothers wary about exposing their children to vaccines. But nurses trained in psychology assure mothers their babies and children will be healthier with the vaccine. Huston witnessed mothers looking “like a deer in the headlights” at first, but he saw their eyes soften as they listened to the nurses.

“There’s no bullying at all,” he said.

Nurses also go to railway stations and go through the trains at their stops to identify children under 5 who need to be vaccinated. At a bus stop located along Karachi’s main highway, near the southern border of Pakistan, Huston said nurses vaccinate around 3,000 children per day. He shadowed a couple nurses on the job and marveled at their effort.

While visiting Pakistan, Huston saw nurses being trained to give vaccine injections for a new project. In certain past cases, Huston explained the virus sampling, used in vaccines to create an immunity to polio, backfired by mutating into a disease. Viruses used in the injection, however, are first killed so they can’t mutate into disease-causing organisms. Children between 5 and 13 may receive the injection, said Huston.

Other efforts have been made to prevent polio from spreading. Since polio is spread by water and food, Huston said 17 water filtration camps were installed in the area he visited. Open two hours a day, residents can come fill their jugs with clean water.

       Making connections

More was expected of Huston on his trip, being the only guest, but after his return he said he experienced “a good feeling of being worn out.”

While his trip was taxing in the sense that he was constantly busy, Huston was pleased with the hospitality of his host family and impressed with the Pakistani Rotarians’ generosity. Although residents of Karachi had all levels of income in an area with some of the worst slums Huston has seen, he said people with money share it.

“It was really an eye-opening trip,” said Huston. “The effort the ‘haves’ are making to help the ‘have-nots’ is truly remarkable in my mind.”

The appreciation was mutual. In the November issue of the Pakistan National PolioPlus Newsletter, Chief Editor Alina A. Visram wrote about Huston’s participation in the Karachi polio campaign.

“This was his first visit to Karachi, Pakistan, and he was a keen visitor,” wrote Visram. “… It was certainly a privilege and honour to have Dr. Richard Huston with us in Karachi and we thank him for making this trip.”

Sucess!

Image result for red cross blood drive
(Laura received the following email regarding the Blood Drive last Monday 11/25/19)
 
Thank you very much Laura and the Faribault Rotary for hosting the blood drive yesterday!  Here are some of the numbers from the day:
 
34 people made appointments
13 walk-ins
8 no-shows
39 people registered at the blood drive
4 deferrals
1 quantity not sufficient
6 power red donors (that’s great!)
40 units of blood collected
 
That is amazing! 40 units is by far the most we’ve collected at a Faribault Rotary blood drive. That was 15 units over our goal. The blood you collected yesterday has the potential to save up to 120 lives. A lot of families are going to be thankful for that this Thanksgiving.
 
Thanks again for all your help!
 
Caroline
 
Caroline Olstad │ Account Manager
American Red Cross
100 S. Robert Street, St. Paul, MN 55107
612-214-6794

Thank you to the following Rotarians for volunteering your time to make this a success!  
Nort Johnson ,Jake Cook, Brian Daniels, Mary Reese, Greg Cielsuk, David Connelly, Todd Sesker, Franz Boelter, Brenda Demars, Rod Mahler, Kurt Halverson and Laura Bock.

Service Above Self

 

Dr. Huston received a warm welcome from the Rotary Club of  Karachi Nexus.

 

Giving a well appreciated polio vaccine.

 

These are gifts of appreciation giving to Dr. Huston by his friends in Pakistan.

 

This is the honorary plague given by the Rotary Club of Karachi Nexus.

Christmas
Twas a week before Christmas, when all through downtown,
Not a Rotarian was stirring, no one to be found;
The invites were made by Donn Johnson with care,
In hopes that everyone would soon be there;
 
The Rotarians were nestled all snug in their beds;
While visions of Christmas concerts danced in their heads;
They knew in a moment the time had drawn near,
To sign-up with Donn and tell him no fear;
 
For we will be coming, even bringing a guest;
Looking forward to lunch and the choir's singing best;
More rapid than eagles the Faribault Rotarians came,
And Donn whistled and shouted and called them by name:
 
Now, Ciesluk! Now, Kenney! Now, Sanchez and Kramer!
On, Daniels! On, Wheeler! On, Elwood and Ginter!
To the seat of your cars! To the end of the street!
Now dash away! Dash away! And soon we will meet!
 
Then we heard Donn exclaim, as he walked out of sight;
"Happy Christmas to all, and to all a good night!"
 
All Rotarians, Rotaract members, their families, and guests are invited to the 80th annual Faribault Rotary Christmas Concert to be held on Wednesday December 18th (11:45 am- 1:15 pm) at Our Savior's Lutheran Church. The joyful sounds of the holiday season will be brought to us by the Faribault High School Choir. Our host for over 30 years, Donn Johnson asks that you use the online sign up via email if you will be coming and bringing one or more guests.  The cost of the meal is $11 unless you are on the meal plan.
 

Rod Mahler- Bob Bjorgum

With the recent sale of the Mason's Building there was a discovery of folder with some letters, pictures and Daily News clippings.  The folder had the name Francis Lockwood- Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company. Mr. Lockwood was a longtime member and our 47th president in 1967-68.  His most notable club legacy was sponsoring membership for a young upstart life insurance salesman by the name of George Wickstrom who has now been a member for 45 years. (Yes, George this is a fleeceable event!)
 
Pictured here are our two longest serving Rotarians, (at left)Rod Mahler 61+ years and the late Bob Bjorgum 59 years!  Rod will have to tell us who got the pie in the face!
 
 

Congratulations Jake!

There are many deserving candidates for the Rotarian of the Year every year.  However, the committee and club would like to congratulate, and honor Jake Cook as the 2019 Rotarian of the Year.
 
Jake joined the Faribault Rotary club in March of 2007 and lives the Rotary motto of service above self on a daily basis.  Jake currently serves on the board of directors, as well as serves as the Rotary Youth Services President.  He has held a variety of leadership roles and positions throughout his years in Rotary, and here are a few highlights as mentioned in his nominations:
  • Jake chaired the community services committee and led our efforts with the Rotary Blood Drive, meals-on-wheels, Salvation Army Bell Ringing, Basic Blessings Backpack Program events., and more.  You could also find Jake and his family volunteering during these events.
  • Jake volunteered and served on the International Services committee traveling with the team to Sierra Leone in our club’s effort to establish a sustainable cassava farming and processing project in remote areas of Africa.  He was also involved with the district and international grant process and helped raise the necessary funds for the project.
  • As a believer in service above self, Jake became our Club President in 2016-2017.  He really stepped up to the plate and filled this role a year earlier than planned, as our Badger/Packer friend Dan Hedge moved to his new home in Illinois the year he was supposed to fill this role.
  • During his year as Club President Jake had many accomplishments.  Most notable was the “Buddy Bench” project.  Again, he helped raise the necessary funds and partner with other agencies within the community to make this project a success.   Jake also led the efforts to partner with the Elks Ice Fishing contest and help get kids exposed to the great outdoors!!!
  • As president of the Rotary Youth Services board, Jake has done an outstanding job with all areas of this great nonprofit entity.  His office manages the camp schedule and Jake has spent countless hours helping preserve this great asset.  Most notably this year with helping roof the camp, as well as getting the camp back into working order after the tornado last fall.  Jake has also led or helped on the Picnic committee for several years…an event many look forward to every year.
  • Jake has served on the raffle committee and is usually one of the top salespersons with this raffle, as well as our annual Rotary Rose Sale.  The CWS offices look amazing this week as he typically delivers 75-100 roses each year.
  • Jakes leadership abilities crossover to other community and family activities as well, with involvement in numerous board and other activities.  He has been a chamber ambassador, served on the Ducks Unlimited Board, served on the Football Association Board and is the current president and a coach with the Faribault Fastpitch Association.  You will also find him helping with the March of Dimes and Cancer Stroll fundraising efforts.  I’m sure we have missed a few as well…but we thank Jake for his “Service Above Self” in the Faribault Community.
 
Jake, thank you for everything you have done for our club and will continue to do in the future.   IF you want a project done and completed in a successful manner, Jake Cook will be there to lead or help in any way possible.  The saying goes “the only thing that is equal in life is that we all get 24 hours each day, or 86,400 seconds to make a difference”.  Although this will cost you a dollar, you are able to balance your work and clients at Comprehensive Wealth Solutions/Faribo Insurance, family time and community activities.  Please help me congratulate Jake Cook, 2019 Rotarian of the Year.

Local clubs share the warmth with neighbors in need

     Hundreds of local residents received needed winter apparel on Saturday during the Faribault Rotary Club’s annual distribution.
Coats, boots, hats, mittens, gloves and scarves and other winter clothing were available to the hundreds who came to the Washington Rec Center. The event was a partnership between the Elks, Rotary Club and Allina Club.
     “It feels not only good to help people, but it feels good to collaborate with organizations, too, who see the need,” said Keith Kramer, past president of the Faribault Rotary Club. “It’s right when it’s starting to get below freezing.”
      Kramer estimated 70 families attended, most with at least five children. He noted organizers had selection sites and advertised, receiving $3,500 in donations that enabled them to purchase clothing. He estimated they had 30 volunteers Saturday, including people who spoke Spanish and Somali.
     “It’s good to see people of all backgrounds coming to help people in need,” Kramer said.
“Especially in Faribault, there is a big need in our community for kids to have warm clothing, and this is a good time of the year to do it.”
Abdinisr Ahmed volunteered at the event. He said he enjoys helping people and the cold weather motivated him to help those in need.
“It’s so good today to be here and help the community,” he said.

Thanks to Rotary Club scholarships,

seven Faribault High School students spent part of their summers growing as vocalists and musicians, whether that meant attending camps or enrolling in vocal lessons.

     The Faribault Rotary Club offers scholarships to students involved in music electives each spring, using the proceeds collected from the Rotary scholarship concert held at FHS the fall prior. This year’s 54th annual concert is 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 28 in the FHS auditorium.

     Kayla Kenow, a junior euphonium player in the FHS band, used her $400 scholarship to help pay for the Minnesota All-State camp over the summer. Kenow was the only student in the FHS band to receive the All-State honor last school year as well as the Rotary Club scholarship.

“I definitely learned how to be a better musician [at All-State camp],” said Kenow. “I made a lot of good friends I still have today.”

     Joe Timmer, band director at FHS, said it always takes a couple weeks to decide who to nominate for the honor because so many students deserve the recognition. In most cases, all three FHS directors select students who already received All-State honors so they can use the scholarship money to attend the All-State camps offered over the summer.

     Two violinists in the FHS Philharmonic Orchestra, Maddie Klecker and Avery Rein, received $200 Rotary Scholarships each.

Klecker began playing the violin 11 years ago and was named a Minnesota All-State alternate for 2018-19.

“When I was younger, I just liked [the violin] for the sound, but now I realize it’s a lot more than that,” said Klecker. “It can be used for a lot of different things — I play at church and at weddings. It’s nice to see what joy an instrument can bring.”

Said Michael Sloane, director of the FHS Philharmonic Orchestra: “Maddie Klecker is very diligent on making sure things are done right, and she’s not afraid to speak up when things aren’t right.”

     While most Rotary scholarship winners had previously earned All-State honors, violinist Avery Rein is the exception. She used her scholarship to attend an orchestra camp in Northfield, which challenged each instrumentalist according to their skill level. At the end of the camp, the orchestra performed in a concert.

When Sloane began teaching orchestra at Faribault Middle School, he said Rein was one of his first students. He’s pleased to see her continue playing violin with the FHS Philharmonic Orchestra and lead her peers in the schools’ orchestra council.

“Avery is a very bright girl who knows what she wants,” said Sloane. “She’s a very artistic person … a very good violinist.”

     Four FHS choir students each received $200 Rotary scholarships as well — senior alto Nya Anter, senior soprano Abby Engbrecht, junior bass Tanner Longshore and junior soprano Lizzie Cooper. Anter, Engbrecht and Longshore, all Minnesota All-State students named in May, used their scholarships to attend the weeklong All-State choir camp at St. Olaf College. Their All-State group reunites in February, 2020 at the Orchestra Hall in Minneapolis for its All-State concert.

“It’s been really good,” said Longshore of his choir experience. “Obviously there are ups and downs, but it’s helping me express myself more.”

Added Anter, who has taken choir for 11 years with elementary school included: “I’ve always loved singing and performing.”

Cooper, an All-State alternate, took voice lessons with her scholarship money. She’s been in choir since fourth grade.

“It’s made me have more of a reason to be in school,” said Cooper. “It’s given me a passion I can enjoy.”

Published with permission from the Faribault Daily News

 

Welcome!

     Paul Perez is a member of the Rotary Club of Prior Lake. He joined in April of 2003 and was Club President in the 2013‐2014 Rotary year. Paul ascended into leadership roles through Prior Lake Rotary’s Lakefront Music Fest, the Club’s largest fundraiser for their 501c3 foundation. After successfully heading up the Transportation committee, Paul went on to be one of the event co-chairs. The event went through numerous changes and had great success including a net profit of just shy of a quarter million dollars in 2013. Paul continued to be involved in the event as a member of the steering committee and the talent committee.
     As President, the Club had unparalleled success under Paul’s watch. The Club achieved top honors within its District in per capita giving to the The Rotary Foundation and giving to PolioPlus and Fast for Hope. Further, the Club added 16 members that year, and ended up at a net 11‐member gain. Through Paul’s urging, the Club added the Youth Service committee and reintroduced the idea of starting an Interact Club at the high school, which was accomplished the following year.
     Paul’s additional involvement at the Club level has included Community Service co‐director, Youth Exchange counselor, and Public Image co‐director. On a District level, Paul served on the Board of Directors as the large club representative for three years. He helped on the District Public Image committee in 2014‐2015 and presented at the Public Image breakout sessions at the District Conference. Paul has been a member of the District PolioPlus committee, and created the District PolioPlus Facebook page to increase the awareness of the eradication efforts.
     He was part of the planning committee for the 2016 joint District Conference, and the 2017 District Conference planning committee as one of the chairs. Paul attended the Rotary International conferences in Lisbon, Portugal in 2013, and Atlanta, Georgia in 2017, and attended the Zone 28 and 29 Emerging Leaders training in Cleveland in 2016. Not the only person passionate about Rotary in his household, Paul’s wife Susan joined the Club in 2013. Her involvement has grown to include Prior Lake High School Interact Club mentor, and Youth Exchange Country Officer in‐training. She has also been heavily involved in the Youth Service and Foundation committees.
     Paul and Susan have two children, Anthony and Anna. Both have been around Rotary all their lives, including being charter members of the Prior Lake High School Interact Club. Anthony was an outbound exchange student to Germany during his gap year. The rest of the family took the opportunity to host their first Exchange Student that year, an experience that was more than they had ever hoped for.
     Paul has worked for the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community for the last 23 years, where he is currently the Property Services Director with a staff of over 100 employees. His responsibilities include maintaining the grounds, parking garages, and parking lots at both Mystic Lake Casino Hotel and Little Six Casino, and overseeing both fleet maintenance for the entire property and the 7‐day onsite laundry and dry-cleaning operations.
     Paul grew up in St. Paul and graduated from Mankato State University in 1990 with a Bachelor of Science in Management and Marketing. He also wrestled for the Mavericks during his 5 years at MSU. Paul’s other volunteer experience includes over 10 years on the Prior Lake Wrestling Club Board, and an appointment as a Planning Commissioner for the City of Prior Lake for 10 years. Paul enjoys trips to the family’s cabin in Northern Minnesota, pheasant hunting trips to South Dakota, fishing anytime, watching amateur wrestling, and listening to music.

Fun and Fellowship

 

Beautiful night!

 

No arrests!

 

The kids had a great time!

 

Great food!

Tradition

Past President Keith Kramer was all smiles when he accepted his plaque for recognition of his excellent year of service as the Faribault Rotary Club's 99th president. He is pictured here with current president, Amy Amundson.

Dick Huston

Dick Huston returned from a Rotary Exchange trip to Germany last month. He was able to exchange flags with 7 other Rotary clubs. He was able to sew the flags onto one of our banners and they are now on display at each meeting.  If you get a chance to visit with him about the trip, please do so. Thank you Dick for representing our club!

Passing the gavel: Faribault Rotary inducts its 100th president

Reprinted with permission from the Faribault Daily News

Hand to hand, a gavel passed through 31 past presidents of the Faribault Rotary Club until it reached Amy Amundson — the 100th president.

The passing of the gavel signifies the effort and dedication of each president, those in attendance and those unable to attend, to bring the club through its first 100 years, practicing the Rotary tradition of “Service above Self” and showing full support for Amundson and her year of service focused projects.

Amundson was sworn in as president Wednesday by her predecessor, Keith Kramer.

Each year, Rotary Presidents help oversee and administer service-oriented projects to benefit the community as well as expand the reach of the club.

In Kramer’s year, the Faribault Rotary Club ran the Warm Our Community event for the first year and added a Habitat for Humanity workday where volunteers helped paint a house on the north side of town.

Warm Our Community is a clothing drive in November to collective gently used outerwear — gloves, coats, boots — so area kids can keep warm during the notoriously frigid Minnesota winters. After the drive, people in the community are invited to stop by and pick out as many items as they need.

Kramer also continued the sponsorship of the Faribault Rotaract Club — a service minded organization in which South Central College students organize themselves and complete projects in the community.

One of the Rotaract Club projects this year was volunteering at Believet Canine Service Partners, which trains dogs and provides them to veterans free of charge.

“Veterans who suffer from PTSD or a visible disability who can’t get around as easily anymore without interruptions tend to confine themselves to their homes,” Rotaract President Piper Nelson said. “It’s debilitating, but with the help of these service dogs, veterans can get back to enjoying life and completing basic everyday activities.”

Though the students were not qualified to help with the training, they did care for the dogs and took them on walks. They also had the opportunity to learn from watching a veteran work with a service dog.

“For us, this is a huge deal,” Nelson said. “It’s not just picking up garbage in a park, which also makes an impact, but this is something that directly impacts not only each of us Rotaractors, but also the dogs and the vets. It’s more than doing something to gain something in return; it’s doing something hoping to help another in the best way possible.”

“This year has been a big success,” Kramer said. “We do things once and learn what we can do better next time… It’s an opportunity to get involved in one or more areas you’re passionate about. It’s awesome people, doing awesome things.”

Volunteering since 1920, Rotary members are continuing to better the community into their 100th year as well.

Rotary clubs can be found throughout the world. Just last week, Rotary member Richard Huston added 10 flags from three different continents — Australia, Germany and the United States — to the 80 flags representing locations where Faribault Rotarians have visited other Rotary Clubs.

This year’s universal mission of Rotary Clubs is to connect the world.

“We want to bring about world peace by connecting people around the world,” Amundson said. “When you have friends in a different place, you care more about that place.”

The mission of connecting people also impacts people on a local level.

“The vast majority of the club is youth focused,” Amundson said. “Youth are important because they are our future in the community.”

Amundson said club members are involved, volunteering to read one-on-one with students as Rotary Readers; inspire kids and teach them about virtues at Respect and Courage Retreats; and help them increase their GPA as part of Faribault Schools’ STRIVE program. And that’s only a partial list, she said.

Faribault’s 59 Rotary members are always ready to lend a hand. For the 100th year, Amundson asked the members to keep track of every bit of service they provide in the hopes of achieving 5,900 acts of service i— 100 hours per person — n the community by next year.

“It’s surprising how many are doing this already,” Amundson said. “We’re always looking for more members to expand our impact. The more members we have the more good we can do in our community.”

Reporter Renata Erickson can be reached at 507-333-3129. Follow her on Twitter @FDNrenata.

©Copyright 2019 APG Media of Southern Minnesota. All rights reserved.

Past Presidents

BLAST FROM THE PAST

Past Faribault Rotary Presidents attending Wednesday's gavel passing were pictured from left to right:

1972-73: Rod Mahler 53rd

1973-74: Dr. Roy Anderson 54th

1989-90: Jim Nielson 70th

1991-92 Donn Johnson 72nd

1996-97: Don Olson, 77th

1997-98: Wade Karli, 78th

1998-99: Pastor Gordon Orde, 79th

2002-03: Darlene Meillier, 83rd

2004-05: Richard Cook, 85th

2007-08: Grant Wilson, 88th

2009-10: Dr. Lisa Humfeld-Wilson, 90th

2011-12: Dr. Murray Hanson, 92nd

2012-13: Kymn Anderson, 93rd

2013-14: Brent Peroutka, 94th

2014-15: Tony Langerud, 95th

2015-16: Dr. Richard Huston, 96th

2016-17: Jake Cook, 97th

2017-18: Troy Dunn, 98th

2018-19: Keith Kramer, 99th

2019-20 Next president, Amy Amundson, 100th

Brazil

President Keith exchanges flags with Marina who represents the Rotary Club of Marillia Brazil in Rotary District 4510. Her father has been a Rotary member since 1994.

Congratulations Dick!

Dick Huston and his wife, Nancie Huston, not pictured, were recognized last week as Rotary Foundation major donors by Rotary District Governor Mike Becker and next year's district governor, Paul Perez. Major donor honors are given when an individual(s) gives a total of $10,000 to the Rotary Foundation. Huston, second from right, is also a member of the Paul Harris Society, a recognition given to those who donate $1,000 in a year to the foundation. Only one other member of the Faribault Rotary Club — Marv Schrader — has been given this honor. The Rotary Foundation has six areas of focus: basic education & literacy, maternal & child health, water & sanitation, disease prevention & treatment, peace & conflict resolution, and economic & community development. Also pictured is Faribault Rotary Club President Keith Kramer, left.

Making a difference!

     Thank you to Keith, Laura and Natalie for painting and George & Brenda for providing food. There was some soreness reported by our distinguished president  in the days after. They are hopeful  that we can do another project for Habitat next year as it was a very rewarding experience.

Faribault Rotary Club

Last Wednesday, we celebrated our 99th anniversary to kickoff the countdown to 100 years on May 1, 2020. Over 60 people attended including Rotarians past and present, the next two district governors, family and friends. Thank you to everyone who helped make this a success.  The following speech was given by President Keith:
 
May 1, 1920- May 1 2019
 
 
 The Faribault Rotary Club was established 99 years ago today on May 1, 1920 as Rotary's 596th club with 22 charter members and by the end of the first-year membership had reached a total of 35.   
 
E.B. Johnson, representing the district governor of the International Rotary Clubs, and three other members of the Minneapolis Rotary Club met with our charter members.  The first President of the Faribault Rotary Club was Frank W. McKellip.
 
Meetings were held on the first and third Monday of each month and on the evening of the fourth Monday. By 1927 the weekly meeting time was moved to noon on Wednesdays and remained there to this day. Over the years the club has held its meetings at the Elks Club, Harvey Hotel, Bluebird Inn, Hotel Faribault, Evergreen Knoll, Faribault Country Club, the Elks Club (again,) Bernie’s Vintage Ballroom and now and possibly for the next 99 years ------The Inn at Shattuck.
 
By next year at our 100th anniversary, our club will have had approximately 5000 weekly meetings with our 61-year member, Rod Mahler attending over 2800 of those meetings.  
 
 
Our club has sponsored four other clubs: 1) Owatonna- 1922 2) Northfield- 1925 3) Cannon Falls- 1954 and 4) The new Rotaract club at South Central College this year.
 
Youth service whether local or international has been one of our objectives over the last 99 years. Some examples include the following:
  • In 1924 the club held a picnic for 290 boys at Roberds Lake.
  • The Youth Camp on Cedar Lake was dedicated in 1963 and is stayed an important part of our club to this day.
  • In 1994, our club sponsored a shelter for the street children of Santarem, Brazil which provided a place for them to meet in groups and participate in life improvement activities.
  • In 2010, we sponsored the Rotary youth soccer fields area at Bahl fields in the Faribault Soccer Complex and provide shirts every year through the “Little Feat” program.
  • In 2017, we were involved with the Buddy Benches that were installed at local elementary schools.
 
We have established a number of traditions that are still an important part of the Faribault Rotary Club.  In 1939 the Faribault High School Choir started a Christmas Concert tradition which will celebrate 80 years this December.
 
 
In 1965, the Faribault Senior High Band, Choir and Orchestra performed with the proceeds used for the benefit of the Faribault Youth Services Inc. This October will be the 54th year.
 
Rotary luncheon programs are varied and interesting. We have had Senators, congressman, state and local politicians come to report their views. Programs over the years included topics such as:
-The question in 1941 was “Does Faribault need an airport?
- “A program on Direct Dialing telephones and the new Highway 35 progress were highlights in 1961.
- In the last 10 years we had historically informational and international adventure programs from our own Rotarians George Wickstrom and Dick Huston.
Our program chairmen and members over the years have provided excellent programs
 
Our club has had six district governors and the last one, Layton Hoysler, was in 1974. We look forward to the next club member who fills that role in the future.
Women were able to join Rotary starting in 1988 with Janine Sahagian as the first to join our club and was president in 1999-00. This year we celebrate the installation of Amy Amundson as our 100th president for the 2019-2020 Rotary year on June 26th.  On May 1, 2020, one year from today, the Faribault Rotary club will celebrate its 100th anniversary with a pledge to continue service above self for the next 100 years and beyond!
 

Fun evening!

The table of past presidents.
Pastor Greg led us in singing with "Take me out to the Ballgame" from our 1967 songbooks!
Families enjoying the fire and s'mores!

May 1, 1920

The Faribault Rotary Club was established 99 years ago today on May 1, 1920 as Rotary's 596th club with 22 charter members and by the end of the first-year membership had reached a total of 35.  Please come to our celebration of 99 years at 5pm tomorrow and President Kramer will  tell us the "Rest of the Story!"

Congratulations!

Last Wednesday, we handed out 4 STRIVE (Student Taking Renewed Interest in the Value of Education) scholarships totaling $9000. Lauren Steinberg & Kevin Tovar each received a $2500 scholarship for the most improved GPA. Brook Flicek & Evelyn Nigon each received a $2000 for illustrating Rotarian values. 

New Club at South Central College

     The Faribault Rotaract Club recently received their charter at a Faribault Rotary Club meeting. The club is comprised of 28 students from South Central College and is open to all young adults who wish to provide service to the community. One of the group's service projects is to volunteer at Believet Canine Service Partners, which trains service dogs for veterans.
     The Rotaracts will host dogs in their homes on weekends, as well as feed, groom, walk and perform other care tasks. In addition, the group is working on creating a volunteer program at St. Lucas Care Center. For more information about the club, visit rotary5960.org/clubInfo/scc-rotaract.

Reprinted with permission from the Faribault Daily News

 

To some, he's a dedicated veterinarian. To some, a world traveler. To some, a proud Rotarian.

To all, he's Richard "Dick" Huston. There's no one way to define a man who's traveled to all seven continents, who's helped settle lawsuits dealing with cattle or who's been on the Minnesota Timberwolves' private plane.

Somehow the 1,000-piece puzzle comes together to create a mosaic of a man who won't let life come to him. Click on the "Read More" link below for the rest of the article.

 

The Faribault Rotary Club has placed a second "Little Free Library" at Our Savior's Lutheran Church to provide greater variety and meet a growing usage.  The "Little Free Library" program was begun by Rotarian Todd Bol of Hudson, WI in 2009.  He made the first one out of an old door in the shape of a school house to honor his mother who had been a school teacher. He put it in his front yard with his mother's books.  Since then 75,000 Little Libraries have been placed in all 50 states and 88 countries.  Improving basic education and literacy is one of Rotary International's area of focus.  Todd Bol died on October 18th from cancer at the age of 62.

Aquatic Center

Tuesday was an important day for the Faribault Family Aquatic Center.
Members of the Faribault Rotary Club gathered to initiate the center’s next move in helping those in wheelchairs access the pool. The Faribault Rotary Club donated a special type of wheelchair so that disabled children can also enjoy the pool and summer fun.
     “I am excited that the wheelchair will allow more people to experience the fun of the Aquatic Center who were not previously able to participate,” Faribault Rotary President Keith Kramer said in an email.
Rotarian Barton Jackson, also in an email, said that he proposed this idea at a board meeting last fall. The board approved of the idea, and a month later the funding was also approved.
As of now, there doesn’t seem to be any plans to update the pool to accommodate wheelchairs, though it doesn’t seem to be necessary. The pool has a zero-depth entry in which the water gets gradually deeper as a person walks in. Pools without this type of entry have a ramp that allows handicapped swimmers to enter in a similar way.
 
     This new change will come as a blessing to people who live with various disabilities.
Jackson, whose son is disabled, noted the difficulty for families like his in going to places that aren’t handicap accessible, which can make it impossible for disabled youngsters to get the same experience as others. This new pool wheelchair will allow disabled children to have the same or similar experience as those who are able-bodied in enjoying a common childhood pastime.
Additionally, Jackson said that there are limited options for children with disabilities to have fun like other kids, and that having this opportunity makes life a bit easier for children and parents.
 
     Kramer noted that the organization’s motto is Service Above Self, and that Rotary focuses on many community projects such as Red Cross Blood Drive and other charities.
“I hope people will be encouraged by our service above self-way of life and know there are people who care and want to see Faribault and surrounding communities thrive,” Kramer said.
“Rotary does a lot of service projects in the community and this is another one of those that we saw need for handicapped children to enjoy some of the amenities that other children can enjoy, so the club voted to buy a handicapped (pool) wheelchair so that those children who can’t get into the water have an opportunity to do so,” Rotarian Richard Huston said.
Rotary International began in 1905 with Paul Harris and has continued to grow in members and charity work. Much of their charity has focused on polio, which since the Rotary’s start in 1985, polio has declined by 99%.
 
     The Rotary Club is meant for many ages. People who are 18+ are encouraged to join. If someone would like to find more about the Rotarian program, members meet every Wednesday at 12:15 at The Inn at Shattuck-St. Mary’s for a lunch. Kramer encourages people to join.
“Someone should join because we have great people, a great purpose, and we also have fun along the way!” Kramer said.
This year, the Rotary Club’s theme is “Be the Inspiration,” chosen by International President Barry Rassin. The “Be the Inspiration” theme combined with Kramer’s words of encouragement that people join if they want to make a difference in a meaningful way, all in all, sounds like the perfect head start in bringing more recognition and access to everyone.
Reprinted with permission from the Daily News.
Reach Reporter Clare Bender at 507-333-3128 or follow her on Twitter @FDNclare.
© Copyright 2018 APG of Southern Minnesota. All rights reserved.
 

Dick and Troy planting a tree with Jefferson student, Omar Hajii-Mohamed.

Boy plants tree

When Rotary International‘s incoming president challenged each of its members worldwide to plant a tree this year, Faribault’s Rotaryfound some eager helpers to achieve the goal.

On Monday, longtime Faribault Rotary Club member Dick Huston rallied Jefferson Elementary School’s third-graders, getting them to help him plant 93 trees, one for every third-grader in the school.

Environmental degradation and global climate change are serious threats to everyone, said Rotary International President Ian H.S. Riseley. “They are having a disproportionate impact on those who are most vulnerable, those to whom Rotary has the greatest responsibility. Yet environmental issues rarely register on the Rotary agenda,” he said.

“It is my hope that the result of that effort will be far greater than the environmental benefit that those 1.2 million new trees will bring,” Riseley said. “I believe the greater result will be a Rotary that recognizes our responsibility not only to the people on our planet, but to the planet itself.”

Besides helping achieve the Rotary Club’s goal, Huston saw the tree planting as an educational opportunity for the students to learn more about the environment. Huston said his three pillars are “education, conservation and collaboration,” all of which were accounted for in the tree-planting exercise.

Families of some third-graders agreed to take trees home and plant them there, others opted to have their trees planted at the school. The rest of the trees will be taken to Huston’s farm, where they will be planted during a special field trip for third-graders later this school year.

“I’m really excited,” said Huston before presenting to the students Monday morning. “The kids are so enthusiastic and ready to go.”

Huston and Rice County Sheriff and Rotary Club President Troy Dunn represented the Rotary Monday, but Faribault teachers led the educational portion. In a slideshow presentation, teachers asked students “What are trees good for anyway?” showing them information from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources website.

The students also learned about northern red oak, quaking aspen, red maple and honey locust trees, the four types that will be planted by the students this year.

“It’s so great to have the school district and the Rotary come together,” said Huston of the event. “In a nutshell, it’s just fun.”

Watching them grow

Dunn, a Jefferson Elementary alumnus, proudly talked to the kids about his own tree-planting experience.

“When I was in fourth grade, I planted six trees at my house and now they’re taller than the school,” he said, describing to the kids how their efforts Monday will pay off years down the road.

“Hopefully, next year, you can plant even more and you can watch the trees grow every year,” Dunn added.

With trees donated by the Rice County Soil and Water Conservation District, fertilizer from the Faribault Garden Club and tree stakes donated by Faribo Farm and Home, the effort is truly a local one that the students will benefit from for years.

What Huston hopes is that those students will see their efforts come to fruition when they graduate.

After each tree is planted, the students will tag their tree to take ownership of it, said Huston.

“Hopefully, they can take some graduation pictures with them when they are done,” Huston said.

 

Reach Reporter Gunnar Olson at 507-333-3128 or follow him on Twitter @fdnGunnar.

©Copyright 2018 APG Media of Southern Minnesota. All rights reserved.

 
 
 Club President,Troy Dunn and the honorable Rod Mahler with his award and District Governor, Kyle Haugen
      
The Faribault Rotary Club was established 98 years ago on May 1, 1920 as Rotary's 596th club with 22 charter members and by the end of the first-year membership had reached a total of 35. Those early founders of our club established a tradition of record keeping that has now been passed on to me in the form of 6 boxes of records dating back to the first days of our club. My research into Rod’s time in our club revealed the following:
On March 5th, Rod Mahler has been a member for 60 of the 98 years our club has existed. He joined our club on March 5, 1958 at the age of 24. 
 
On that day Al Burkhartzmeyer did his classification talk.
Rod’s classification talk was on June 7th and his review in the bulletin the next week was as follows:
‘Rod Mahler need not take the back seat when it comes to public speaking. I wonder did the box have a ‘Green Door’ on it?  You did a fine job, and we all enjoyed your classification talk very much”
 
Rod missed 2 weeks in August of that first year with the mumps and then had 10 years of perfect attendance. I estimate that he has attended over 2700 meetings with over 90% attendance and over 3000 total Rotary events of which he would be happy to discuss any one of them with you.
 
Notable program speakers his first year were
  • U of M Hockey coach, John Mariucci
  • Congressman and future Governor Al Quie
  • Captain EM Morgan US Navy Pacific Fleet Naval Defenses
  • Mayor P. Kenneth Peterson- about the new Freeway coming
Rod’s 60 years so far give him the longest membership in our club history.
Other notable long-time members
- Palmer Dragsten 1948- 2006 / 58 years
- Al Burkhartzmeyer 1957-2012 / 55 years
- Tom Gerbig 1969- present / 49 years
- George Wickstrom 1974- present / 44 years
- Nuba Pletcher 1921-1965 /44 years (2nd picture)
-Dr. Donald Chathum 1921-1963 /42 years
 
Rod has those connections back to the first year of our club when the original 35 first year members were added during 1920-21. Nuba Pletcher and Dr. Donald Chathum who joined that first year were still members for 5-7 years after Rod joined in 1958.
 
When I joined 25 years ago, Rod was one of the first Rotarians to welcome me to the club fleecing me during fellowship just to be sure that I felt welcome.  He has always been welcoming and encouraging to new members over the years and is a true example of a Rotarian who puts service above self.
 
 He has served this club and Faribault continuously during his 60-year membership even most recently with the donation of our new American flag and sponsoring the membership of our new chamber President, Nort Johnson.
 
Thank you, Rod for your continued inspiration and  service to our club!
 
Buddy Bench

In order to place eight Buddy Benches at Faribault’s seven elementary schools, the Faribault Rotary worked to raise $10,000. But now that the benches are in place, the real work of educating teachers and students has begun.

The eight benches were installed across the Faribault area from Lincoln Elementary to Nerstrand Elementary in October in an effort to encourage inclusiveness among area kids. Two benches were installed at Jefferson Elementary, which has two playgrounds.

The idea of a Buddy Bench is to provide kids a visible place to sit at their playground if they are feeling alone, sad or left out while other students are at play. The goal of the bench is to attract those kids to the bench and to who’s sitting there so they can include that child.

While the aim of the bench seems simple, the Rotary members who embarked on the mission to put Buddy Benches at each school are working to make sure the benches aren’t just benches.

“Number one, it’s not just a bench,” said Jake Cook, the former Rotary president who made Buddy Benches his presidential project. “It’s to help students engage other students that aren’t feeling involved that day or are having a bad day.”

While he has not seen the benches in action yet, Cook said his children, who attend Nerstrand Elementary, have seen it work, and included kids who are sitting on the bench and taken a seat there themselves during a bad day.

“It’s great to see the finished project and hear stories from teachers and staff and my own children who have used them,” Cook said. “From my understanding, the benches are doing what I’d hoped they’d accomplish.”

The work continues

Last year, when the Buddy Bench project was being concocted, Cook teamed up with Kelly Velander, another Rotary member, who he credits with actually bringing the idea to Faribault after seeing a news report about them working in other communities.

Each year, the Rotary Club president devotes their term to a project like a downtown mural or the Security State Bank clock restoration. Last year, Cook took on Buddy Benches, raising the $10,000 and working with each of the elementary schools to implement them.

Up until the benches were unveiled in October, Cook and Velander took their efforts inside each of the seven schools, working with educators and the students themselves to maximize the effect of the benches on playgrounds.

“We actually had a meeting with staff members from each of the schools,” Cook said. “We wanted to maintain continuity among staff members, so we provided them with PowerPoints and materials developed by Kelly Velander.”

After those meetings, which took place in the first few weeks of the school year, Cook and Velander then asked the teachers to find time to talk with their students about how the Buddy Bench works.

After the conversations took place, Velander said the education appears “seamless,” among the faculty, staff and students across Faribault.

“Staff are saying that students are out there using it and students are dropping everything to go help students on the bench,” Velander said.

One of the educators who participated in the training was Jim Huberty, a behavior interventionist at Jefferson Elementary School. Huberty has noticed students using the benches at Jefferson and appreciated the training he received, pointing specifically to a video emphasizing the importance of using the bench to build longterm relationships.

Most important to Huberty, however, is the impact the benches could have within the walls of Jefferson Elementary.

“The need to fit in and that need to have social interaction is huge and I’m sure that it does transfer over into the academics,” he said. “If a kid is emotionally ready to be with a group of people, they are more ready to learn.”

In the training, teachers and students are taught that the bench should not be a place to sit and socialize, but rather, to promote socialization on the playground. Also, Cook emphasized that a student seated on the bench should play with the first person that offers, and not pick and choose the friends that ask them to play.

“I am proud that we have this in Faribault and I think we have had great support from the community on getting it going,” she said. “Being accepted by peers is a huge issue for students, so I’m hoping that this creates an empathetic group of people growing up in Faribault.”

Reach Reporter Gunnar Olson at 507-333-3128 or follow him on Twitter @fdnGunnar.

The dedication ceremony for Faribault's newest mural was held last Saturday.  The project was spear headed by past president, Dick Huston, who made a short presentation to Rotarians and guests in the lot next to the Chavis building.   Jeremy Chavis was also present and spoke briefly to crowd stating he was honored to display the mural on his building. Pictured below are the Rotarians who attended the dedication.

Stocking It Up

(Reprinted with permission from the Faribault Daily News)

There are few things better than books to put in the hands of youth.

Rotary Club of Faribault, United Way and UNITY students from Faribault High School are doing just that. With the installation Wednesday afternoon at Our Savior’s Luterhan Church of the group's first “little library” (though not the first in town).

“We’re hoping to put five or six of them up in the community in areas where there is a lot of diversity,” Rotary member Dick Huston said. “The hope is to increase reading, which translates to a better education.”

Huston built the library himself, and Taiwanese exchange student Maggie Chen, who lives in Huston’s home, painted it. It’s essentially a large mailbox with a small wooden house at the top of a wood post. On one side, there is a door with a glass window, so anyone can see the books inside.

Many of those books are donated by community members to Rotary, and many come from United Way. The latter organization’s executive director, Adam Von Ruden, was on hand for the installation.

“For us, this project really falls in line with what we do in the community and advocate for,” he said.

Faribault United Way currently runs its own book program, the Dolly Parton Imagination Library, which supplies signed up children with a new book, once a month, from birth to 5 years old. The program is currently at capacity with 875 kids.

Von Ruden notes that in the age of iPads in school and smartphones everywhere else, getting a book in a kid’s hand remains an important step.

“It’s just such a benefit to get kids reading,” he said.

Huston expects more little libraries to be built throughout this year. He said they’ll be strategically placed in areas they might be needed.

Children (and adults) are free to take a book inside the library at their own leisure. They’re encouraged to bring it or another book back, but they don’t have to, as Rotary and United Way are standing by to replenish.

Meanwhile, the UNITY students, represented on Wednesday by Rene Villalta (El Salvador), Tufah Abdulahi (Ethiopia) and Sagal Jama (Somalia), will stop by the little libraries weekly to check if they need to be restocked. UNITY is a group at the high school, where students organize events and opportunities for peers from all different cultures to come together and learn more about each other.

Abdulahi noted that the little library project is a good for the students to participate in the club and help youth in the community.

“It’s to help people better understand reading,” she said.

“It’s really good for kids,” added Jama.

Villalta noted the little libraries could be even easier to use than the regular library.

“It’s free. There are no due dates. You can take your time,” he said in Spanish, translated by his step-mom.

This new project is one of many that Rotary leads in the Faribault community and elsewhere. With clubs in countries all over the world, Huston noted, the Christian organization is made up of more than just Christians, and it aims to help more than just Christians, too.

“In Faribault, there is such a diverse population,” he said. “We have a four-way test: Is it the truth? Is it fair to all concerned? Will it build good will and better friendships? Will it be beneficial to all concerned? This project checks all those boxes.”

The following article is a reprinted from the 75th anniversary booklet of the Faribault Rotary Club in 1995 and covers the early years of our club starting in 1920. Part II will be in next weeks bulletin.
 
Murray Hanson
 
 
FARIBOTARIAN
By: Lyle Schreiber
 
      Woodrow Wilson was president; the 18th Amendment was upheld by the Supreme Court; three Negroes were lynched in Duluth; the Faribault National Guard was sent to Duluth to control the rioting; Fourth Street west of Second Avenue was paved; lots in Southern Heights were selling for a dollar down and a dollar a week; the high school graduating class numbered 93. This was 1920.
 
On Thursday April 29, 1920 E.B. Johnson of Minneapolis, representing the district governor, met with 22 charter members of the Faribault Rotary Club. The charter was dated May 1, 1920. By the end of the first year, the membership had reached 35 and 21 members were added in the second year.
 
The first meetings were held at the episcopal Guild House. Mrs. Anna Kahn was the cook-hostess. Her lunches established a tradition of good food for the club. In 1926, the club moved its meeting place to the ELKS Club with the provision that the price of the lunch would not be more than sixty cents. In 1929, with the completion of the Harvey Hotel (Hotel Faribault) the club moves there for its meetings. Evidently the sixty cent limit still prevailed as, in 1933, the hotel was informed the cost must be reduced to fifty cents or the club would leave. The answer must have been negative, as in 1934 the meeting place was moved to the Blue Bird Inn located on Highway 3, about the present location of Larson Electric, Inc. 
     Mrs. C. N. Crossett and the Inn were famous for fine food. Some Rotarians made a point of arriving at the meetings early for chicken giblets and other appetizers. The club moved back to the hotel and continued to meet there until 1969 when it moved to the Evergreen Knoll. The food was good, but the space was too small, so the Country Club was tried. Again, the space arrangement was not satisfactory and it was decided to move to the Lavender Inn.
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Upcoming Events
Speakers
Cory Caron
Jan 22, 2020 12:00 PM
Mercury Minnesota
Pat McMorrow and Kevin Amundson
Jan 29, 2020
Caring Bridge and How We Heal
Teresa Demars
Feb 05, 2020
History and present day Soil and Water Conservation Districts
Maggie Kiley
Feb 12, 2020 12:00 PM
Nerstrand Elementary school
Steven Pahs
Feb 19, 2020
Rice County Soil and Water Conservation District
Kurt Halverson
Feb 26, 2020
Strive
TBD
Mar 04, 2020
Complete Count Census Committee
Mike Spellman
Mar 11, 2020
Nigeria WASH Global Grant
Charles Cogan
Mar 18, 2020
Northfield Project - Maternity Ward
Sara Coutler
Mar 25, 2020
How Healthy is Faribault
Kaylee Wiens
Apr 01, 2020 12:00 PM
The NEST at Faribault High School
SRO Officers - John Gramling and DJ Skluzacek
Apr 15, 2020
School Resource Officers
Dr. Roy Anderson and Jeff Jarvis
Apr 22, 2020
Ways of the Wahpakute, Band of Dakota
Rick Heidick
May 06, 2020
Fast for Hope