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The Rotary Club of Hamilton AM - Making a Difference

Contact us at info@hamiltonamrotary.ca or join us for breakfast

We meet Wednesdays at 7:15 AM
William's Fresh Cafe
47 Discovery Dr
Hamilton, ON  L8L 8K4
Canada
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District Site
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Venue Map
 
Upcoming Events
 
October 2017 Member Meeting Responsibilities
 
Meeting
Date
Front Desk 1 Front Desk 2
Meeting
Greeter
Grace
 
Introduce 
Speaker
Sergeant
at Arms
October
4
Anne
Birmingham
Mariko
Bown-Kai
Greg
Burbidge
Marvin
Cohen
Yolanda
C-Bragues
Norm
Geddes
October
11
John
Dalgleish
Tim
Dickins
Judy
Dolbec
Kim
Gibson-Chalmers
Ruth 
Greenspan
Judy 
Dolbec
October 
18
Don 
Grennan
Joe
Hamilton
Dave
Gruggen
Walter
Hardie
Bruce 
Horsley
John
Mokrycke
October 
25
Michael
Howes
John
Janisse
Ashi
Jain
Martina
Jobity-Mayers
Cathy 
Jeske
Ruth 
Liebersbach
             
 
If you are unable to carry out your duties as assigned, please find a replacement. Thank You.  Mark Ewer
 
 
Recent Breakfast Speakers and Activities
On October 11, 2017, our guest speaker was Lieutenant-Colonel Gary McQueen, the present Commanding Officer of the 11th Field Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery, with Batteries in Guelph and Hamilton.  Lieutenant Colonel McQueen has deployed to Afghanistan, Iraq, and Kuwait.  He was deployed as part of the middle east stabilization force and served an eight month tour of duty from July 2016 to February 2017.  He was deployed as the senior planning officer for the joint conventional forces.  He holds a a BASc in Chemical Engineering from the University of Toronto and an MBA from McMaster University, and is a registered Professional Engineer in the Province of Ontario.

Gary gave a speech to the club today entitled ‘The Fight Against ISIL.’  He discussed his personal experiences, Canada’s role in Iraq during his deployment and Canada’s Role in Iraq and Syria today.

Gary travelled to Kuwait in July 2016 by C17 Cargo plane.  During his deployment the temperature varied from 32 Celcius to 54 Celcius.  Soldiers’ accommodations were Spartan and comprised of trailers and tents housing eight soldiers per tent.  During his tour, Gary spent the majority of his time between his one bedroom trailer and central Command.  The environment was not hospitable and he and his command encountered foxes, snakes, scorpions and sand fleas.  His mission was to provide relief in place, mission transition services, contingency planning, and special projects.

Canada’s role at the time of his deployment was to provide Royal Canadian Air Force resources which included CF-18 mission support, intelligence and reconnaissance patrols using Aurora aircraft, and in-flight refueling capabilities for the fighter jets of the 26 country coalition fighting ISIL in Iraq and Syria.  Gary noted that the Canadian deployment was well respected for their talents and capabilities and that a Canadian Colonial (Andersen) gave the televised United States briefings on the war in Iraq.  Canada also provided medical support for the coalition, starting in November 2016. Gary noted that Canada supplied a diverse group of units for the fight against ISIL in Iraq and that these units successfully contributed to a vast reduction of territory held by ISIL in both Iraq and Syria which culminated in the liberation of Mosul of which the operation commenced in October 2016 and ended 9 July, 2017; and the new mission of the deployment, which is counterinsurgency.  This length of this operation has been extended until 31 March, 2019.  To complete the new mandate, Canada is supplying Air Cargo, engineers, and in-air refueling tankers, special operations forces (of which there are approximately 300 in Iraq), intelligence, medical, and liaison teams.  He noted that Canada and the coalition is presently committed to the eradication of ISIL.  Gary’s Artillery unit is jointly located in Hamilton and Guelph, Ontario.

 
Ian Ross was our guest speaker on October 4, and is the owner of Ten Thousand Villages, a fair trade store at 162 Locke Street South. He is the former Chief Executive Officer of the Burlington Arts Centre. Ian is a graduate of Concordia University and UC Berkeley California.
Ten Thousand Villages is centered around the concept of fair trade and has been operating since 1946. This concept is centred around sustainable development for the world’s poor and also around securing the rights of marginalized producers and workers in developing countries. The purpose of the company is market development in the poorer nations such as Cambodia, Haiti, and India. The fair trade movement started in Puerto Rico. Ten Thousand Villages operates thirty five stores across Canada. The Hamilton store is the number 2 store in terms of growth in the country. The company processes $40 million in sales worldwide and has 80 stores in the USA.
Ian’s talk centred around the principles of fair trade and ended with a three pronged challenge to the Rotarians of our club. Fair trade is centred around the principles of fair play, trade people can count on/commitment to a sustainable enterprise, empowerment of women/absence of child labour, protection of the environment, supportive community, and empowerment of the poor.
Ian asked the club to consider three activities in Hamilton:
1) Establish Hamilton as a fair trade city through submitting ‘letters of support’ to the city (contact Ian Ross),
2) Using fair trade coffee and teas for our weekly club breakfasts (it does not present an additional cost),
3) Align our personal values with the values of fair trade so as ‘not to live off the backs of people,’ which means shopping fair trade wherever we go. He challenged Rotarians and their friends to shop at his location on Locke street.
Ten Thousand Villages fair trade product line features handcrafted jewellery and personal accessories, natural home décor, and food and skin care products that celebrate both cultural traditions and environmental responsibility. Examples of products include Cambodian bombshell jewellery, jewellery made from oil cans, and handcrafted women’s textiles from India.
 
Our guest speaker on September 27, 2017, was Rob McIsaac, President, Hamilton Health Sciences
 
Rob is the former President of Mohawk College, the first Chairman of Metrolinx and the former Mayor of the City of Burlington.  He spoke on the challenges and opportunities for Hamilton Health Sciences.  Rob informed the club that Hamilton Health Sciences is presently overwhelmed with capacity issues as the corporation is currently operating at 115% capacity, serving 2.5 million patients, however, possesses a goal of operating at 90% of capacity.   Rob also informed the club that Hamilton Health Sciences is facing multiple challenges.  Firstly, the Provincial government is providing constraints on funding the corporation to the tune of a $120 million reduction in the operating budget.  Secondly, there is a rise of chronic disease resulting from, among other items, an aging population in the region.  Thirdly, Rob informed the club that the purchase of new technology for the corporation is both necessary and expensive.  To face these challenges and to save money, the corporation has primarily responded by contracting out services and deferring capital expenditures.  The corporation has also made 1,000 changes to its operating methodologies and has made change management a focus of its daily operating protocol.  There are opportunities, however, for Hamilton Health Sciences corporation as it realigns to meets a changing operating environment.  Firstly, it may make changes to its services and move away from becoming the default provider for health care in the region.  It may also break down silos of management and care by providing a more coordinated and cooperative approach to patient management in Hamilton.  To do this, among other initiatives, Rob is meeting with Doctors and home care providers in an effort to educate and have the community offer alternative patient care models. Examples of changing focus are ‘one-on-one coaching’ between the physician/service provider and the patient.   and a focus on sharing the health care responsibilities of the patient between the services providers in the region and Hamilton Health Sciences corporation.
 
Hamilton Health Sciences is among the top three research hospital corporations in Ontario and among the top five in Canada; and provides services to patients throughout Ontario.  Club members were advised to read the book ‘Being Mortal’ by Atul Gawande (http://atulgawande.com/book/being-mortal/) if a member has a specific interest in learning how to take care of the elderly.
 
 
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In the News

Deirdre Pike - Hamilton Spectator - July 22, 2017 (Deirdre was a guest speaker at our club on June 14, 2017)

 

https://www.thespec.com/opinion-story/7464948-service-clubs-are-still-big-community-contributors/

 

Twenty Questions:  Ruth Liebersbach - Hamilton Spectator - July 11, 2017 (Ruth has been a member of our Club for 13 years)

 

https://www.thespec.com/news-story/7417772-20-questions-ruth-liebersbach/