Club Information
Welcome to our Club!
Vancouver Arbutus

Service Above Self

We meet In Person & Online
Fridays at 12:30 PM
Zoom meeting every other Friday
Vancouver, BC
Canada
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Our club will be partnering with the Rotary Club of Bulindo, and other clubs from our district to bring washrooms to a remote area in Uganda. Safe, underground water will be pumped to a 30,000 liter tank installed at the top of a hill and will provide hand washing and toilet blocks for the community of 5000 and 437 students in the primary school. The mission statement of the Rotary Club of Bulindo is "A voluntary organization that will bring a smile to the vulnerable".
 
 
 
 
 
Welcome to The 2021 Strathcona ROTARY Youth Leadership
HOOP-A-THON!
 
Presented by Vancouver Rotary Clubs, Rotaractors & Interactors:
 
 
ROTARY Club of Vancouver Sunrise, ROTARY Club of Vancouver Yaletown, ROTARY Club of Vancouver, ROTARY Club of Vancouver Arbutus and ROTARY Club of Vancouver Mountainview. We are also supported by the Vancouver Young Professionals Rotaract Club and King George and Point Grey Interactors.
 
We will be holding a safe, socially distanced event with only a few people participating, however the event will be available to our supporters via Zoom online.
 
HOOP-A-THON Date: Saturday, April 24, 2021 (9:00 am)
 
YOU ARE INVITED!  Join us on ZOOM. Here is your Link:
 
 
HELP US HELP THE KIDS! Make a DONATION NOW and receive an instant Tax Receipt:
 
Watch Global BC News coverage of one of our pre-Covid Events:
 
 
Our speaker on the fine Friday was Allan Lingwood, presently of the Victoria Rotary Club and in many respects also an appropriate representative of the Saanich and Oak Bay Clubs, the three of which having effectively combined to assist in the development of disadvantaged segments of society in Uganda.
 
 
On Friday we were pleased to welcome to our Zoom forum Ms. Carolyn Daley. The author of “Vancouver’s Women in Blue”, she spoke with authority of the rise of the female component of the Vancouver Police Force (the book is available from Ruddy Duck Press). She retired from the force after serving for 28 years and retiring as deputy chief constable, at the time the highest rank achieved by a woman in that force.
 
The story of women in the force is not one that has been entirely favourable to the history of the force. There has however in the past few years been a dramatic increase in both the number and the reputation of a force that now represents a solid front to the community. She spoke of the gender-based double standards of women that characterized the role of women in the past (now quite a long past, the first woman police officer being appointed in 1904). There have been issues in the past with respect to the Police Officers Physical Abilities Test (POPAT), which is fundamental to both genders, as both sexes are required to be able to meet exacting standards of the real hazards of the profession, but there are no longer any disputes as to the ability of women to attain those standards.
 
Naturally, not all was (and is?) clear sailing. Carolyn spoke of the real tensions occasionally arising because of the wives of police officers being somewhat against women being in the same force as were their husbands, a situation with which she had to deal while being in such a high leadership position.  In answer to a question from the audience, she frankly said that such divisive matters have occurred, but that public a acceptance of the role of women in the force now seems established. 
 
Altogether a balanced and erudite discussion, but one that rather impelled the listeners to seek out the book (running to 286 pages, one suspects that it is a full and unembroidered story). 
 
 
 
 
One of our club's volunteer opportunities each year is to assist with selling live Christmas trees to benefit youth at risk.  It was a very busy Saturday and each tree needs to have it's trunk cut.  There will be a few sore shoulder's in the morning!
 
Diwali (also called Divali or Deepavali) is a “festival of lights” that celebrates the triumph of light over dark and good over evil, and the blessings of victory, freedom, and enlightenment.  Though technically religious, it’s also become a cultural event in North America that is celebrated with sweets and special foods. 
 
Coinciding with the Hindu New Year, Diwali occurs annually in autumn, during the Hindu month of Kartik. Which begins around mid-October and ends in mid-November.  Specifically, Diwali occurs on the darkest day of the lunar month, which is the day of the new Moon.
 
 
Who celebrates Diwali?
 
Hindus, Sikhs and Jains celebrate the holiday.  
 
Hindus celebrate the legend of the return of the Hindu god Rama and his wife, Sita, to their northern India kingdom of Ayodhya.  The legend says Rama and Sita were exiled for 14 years during which Rama defeated the demon king Ravanna.  Some honour Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth, during Diwali.  
 
In Jainism, it marks the spiritual awakening of Lord Mahavira, a venerated ascetic who fundamentally reformed the faith, reaching a state of nirvana after his death. 
 
For Sikhs, it marks the day that Guru Hargobind Ji, the Sixth Sikh Guru, was freed from imprisonment.
 
 
How do people celebrate Diwali?
 
Because Diwali is celebrated by so many people worldwide, traditions are diverse, though there are a few common themes, including the lighting of candles and the gathering of families.
 
The main celebration of Diwali takes place on the day of the new moon, when the sky is at its darkest, so a big part of the celebration revolves around light.  Candles, clay lamps, and oil lanterns are lit and placed throughout the home, in the streets, in areas of worship, and floated on lakes and rivers.  Fireworks are also set off on the night of Diwali—said by some to ward off evil spirits.
 
Another central theme of Diwali is family. Wearing their best new clothes, families gather together to eat sweets and other special foods, light diyas (decorative oil lamps), and pray for their ancestors.  
 
The feast can be quite extravagant, with the table filled with special dishes and sweets. 
 
five days of celebrations 
  1. On the first day the house is cleaned and rangoli (intricate designs made of colored rice, sand, or flowersare created on the floor of the home.
  2. On the second day special sweets, called mithaiare prepared or bought.   As well, prayer for the spirits of ancestors in the afterlife are conducted.
  3. On the third day, the main day of Diwali, families gather and celebrate by lighting lanterns and candles in their homes and in the streets, and by shooting off fireworks! 
  4. Traditions of the fourth day vary, but a common theme is the bond between husband and wife, so husbands will often buy their spouses gifts to celebrate.
  5. The fifth day focuses on the bond between siblings, specifically between brother and sister. 
      
 
Diwali during Covid-19 pandemic
 
  • Diwali celebrations this year took place under restrictive measures, including mask wearing and physical distancing.
  • Many temples streamed prayer sessions online to avoid large gatherings.
  • Around the world, worried residents opted for low-key celebrations.  Many stayed home and did not visit friends or relatives.  
 
The project began in a conversation between Ron, one of our newest Rotarians, and a Deacon in Victoria.  He mentioned that during a meal program at Christ Church Cathedral in Vancouver they sometimes gave out hats, gloves, and socks if they receive a random donation; but nothing was structured.  What a good idea, Ron thought and, being a man of action, he promptly called the Maundy Café at Christ Church.   They were very excited and said yes, they know where the need is greatest and would love to participate with us.   Ron brought this to the Projects Committee at Rotary Arbutus and it was approved in a flash.  
 
Next Ron and his partner Judith established a list of contents that are most needed and then Ron set about finding suppliers that could donate or provide items at the lowest prices.  The Club and its members would cover the costs. Ron personally covered $250 worth of items.  Next came the making up of “packages”.  With a ban on indoor gatherings due to the pandemic, Ron and Judith did all the assembly themselves.  
 
 
 
Here is Ron’s latest report: 
“Hello fellow Rotarians, and friends: As promised, here is the update and information on the Sock Project. As of today, November 19th, I am pleased to report that the socks and purses (for ladies) are complete. A very special thanks to Yoonhi for accessing the purses (notEuropean Man Bags) for the ladies, and to my lovely partner and Victoria Rotarian Judy (from across the Salish Sea) for lending a woman's touch to the whole process! There are 16 purses and 44 Socks! The only thing left is to coordinate with Vienne at the Maundy Cafe as to the best date for dropping the goods off  and we are just firming up how they would decide who gets the purses and socks.
 
They are very enthusiastic about the project, and I see this being expanded to at least double next year. I will ask them to get a couple of photos at the Cafe on the days they are handing out the purses and socks. 
 
From a personal note, I have found this to be a very interesting and satisfying little project. I look forward to being able to do this with the involvement of more of our fellow Rotarians in the future once the Pandemic is under better control. Thank you for the privilege of being a part of Rotary and for all your kind assistance. If you wish a complete list of what is in the socks and purses, please let me know and I will forward it separately. 
Kindest regards, Ron Fulton
 
PS As to the contents in the socks and purses, Judy and I would love to expand the programme using medium sized backpacks that would accommodate more items, including small fleece blankets. We did put Ikea fleece coverups in the purses this year for the women. Thank you for all your guidance.
 
 
The subject of today’s presentation was the cautionary tale of a legal imbroglio that was to be played out upon your correspondent, a scam with which a number of our members were already acquainted, but whose lesson is worth repeating in this forum.  It took place on October 16th, the morning when I had to attend a procedure at VGH at 7am. This fact resulted in my returning home before 9 o’clock. There I found my wife, deeply distressed, talking on the phone to our eldest grandson, who was evidently in jail by virtue of an impaired driving offence, in which a lamp-post had been badly damaged and he had been ordered to come up with $12,000, before noon, otherwise he would be incarcerated for considerable period of time: he, equally distressed, was crying on the other end of the phone, and elicited from his grandmother a promise not to tell his father, who is a lawyer with a corporate practice, but with very little practical criminal experience (that part was similar to my type of legal practice … i.e. scant experience in the criminal courts).
 
A few moments before I arrived Judith had had a call from the lawyer who had ‘managed to get the court to agree that a $12,000 deposit would fix the immediate problem’.  I phoned him (a 403 number) and told him that I was a retired lawyer, but wished to retain one of my past partners to look after the situation, a comment that elicited a most rude response from the ‘David Mason’, who I was about to tell was acting most unprofessionally when he rudely tole me that he would drop the case and slammed his phone down.  I phoned my old partner, and he referred me to an old friend of our firm’s, who took hold of the problem, phoned around to the courts and their registries and called back to tell me that no Logan Frost had been arrested over the weekend and that this was clearly a scam of some considerable, but flawed, skill.  We phoned our son, he being at home because of Covid, who was able to tell us that Logan was asleep in his room, and had certainly not been drinking or arrested over the weekend.
 
The lesson here is clear: when Judith was first called, the person on the other end of the line was weeping unconsolably, and she reasonably said “is that you, Logan?” This was all that the scammer really needed to know, his voice being unrecognizable given his extreme 'distress'.  Fortunately, I had enough nounce to call those who could help, even though I was obviously operating on low wattage, and the schema was, in retrospect, shambolic and ill-thought-through.  But we know of two other instances in the past where a similar modus operandi has been tried, once with success.  And if 2 to 3% of these calls work, somebody can make a pile of money: the mantra must be “keep calm”! 
 
 
I cannot let this opportunity to proselytize pass without making a comment about the disturbing news received over the weekend wherein a major food retailer prohibited its employees wearing the poppy over the coming Remembrance Day, a stricture apparently rescinded only a day or two after being pronounced.  But it is easy to forget what this symbol means to our society, and, if anyone wishes to do so, a commentary can be found in the book “Douglas Haig: From the Somme to Victory” by Gary Sheffield.  From here we learn that the British Legion acquired the symbolic red Flanders poppy in large part because of John McRae’s poem ‘In Flanders Fields’.  The Legion, partly created because of Field Marshal Haig’s concern respecting the vast numbers of unemployed and abandoned soldiers, though hesitant to adopt the symbol, finally agreed in August 1921 to the creation of a Poppy Day on the anniversary of Armistice Day.  “The first Poppy Day was a huge success” the book records, and by 1926 disabled servicemen were employed in a factory that “manufactured 25 millions poppies a year”.  It became in 1921 "an instant tradition”.  It is difficult to declare now whether the pandemic will lessen or increase the popular respect for this institution … one suspects that it might well result in even greater relevance, though the availability of the poppies themselves today seems quite  restricted, if only because of the absence of retired servicemen to sell them in shopping arenas.  It is interesting to note that the parade at the Cenotaph was first broadcast in 1927 by the fledgling BBC: that tradition now seems an intrinsic part of each passing year.
 
 
Today we were pleased to welcome Maura from the Aboriginal Mothers’ Centre Society.  She is a Dene, born in Yellowknife NWT.  As a proud mum of 5 boys, she is honoured and privileged to live on the Unceded Traditional Territories of the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh First Nation.  Maura directed herself into the AMCS via being brought up in a foster home, facing being a high-school dropout, and statements to her face that she had “no future” before her, she recently completed her Masters degree in Social Work, and thereby became devoted to keeping families intact and hopeful for the future.  One can readily appreciate that this is a difficult enough task within that community by itself, but that the hurdles have escalated because of the pandemic almost goes without saying.
 

The difficulties that the Society face are obviously formidable, one of the first to be faced being a slide into dependancy that is unfortunately so characteristic in many small and remote communities.  Maura has intimate acquaintance with the limitations of resources to assist the large number of persons who now cannot easily be assisted at all (the Society’s doors have had to be closed, she hopes temporarily, to seniors in obvious need) as the need is growing to render assistance in providing food to the needy, and to address the well-publicized desperation of those who overdose, a need often mollified by the rather simple expedient of simply spending time with those in need and those who have often given up hope.
 
The Society’s facilities have been put under further stress by the recent need for all of the case workers to have to spend two weeks in isolation as they are faced with 15 positive Covid sufferers, and yet have to provide over 200 meals a day to others who rely upon such assistance merely to survive.  She made the point that probably needed to be made, this being that the Society now not only looks after indigenous clients, but actively assists in providing assistance to other groups and organizations that have become hamstrung themselves because of the pandemic hitting their helpers and staff.  Fortunately, valuable assistance to the the Society has been provided by the Food Banks … although most of us are now quite aware of the difficulties that those centres themselves face a shortage of supplies and staff.
 
Upon being asked what items are most needed, Maura indicated that coats, blankets and socks (the latter of which always appear very high on the list of needs for those at the trail end of society, but which last so short a time for those who need warm and dry feet) are always in demand. The place to deposit such things, especially before the coming cold weather, is 2019 Dundas. A moving and effective talk.  
 
 
 
These assorted hats were knit by Grandma Ella to reduce stress during Covid.  They were appreciated at the Aboriginal Mother's Centre which has transitional housing for 16 Mom's and 32 Children.  Winter is coming!
 
         
 
We were pleased to welcome, albeit in unique format, District Governor Dave Hamilton, who was introduced by Assistant DG John Bathurst … who did so at justifiable length, especially as we were also introduced to Dave’s wife, who gloried under the soubriquet ‘Galaxy’, is herself next year’s President of the Sunshine Coast Club, and apparently painted away at home, unseen by the meeting, until introduced by her husband, at which time we found that she really was painting all the while! In fact, quite a few of us had already met Dave in the days when we could meet and greet over fish, chips and wine … may those days soon return!
 
Recently, when returning home from a conference, Dave and his wife found themselves in an airport departure lounge, and sitting there the current Rotary International President, Holger Knaack, whom he described as a ‘cool-looking guy’. Dave took the opportunity to have a brief chat (one doesn’t want to be too liberal in intruding upon another’s privacy) and followed a brief description with an excerpt from a video recorded by Holger: and plainly he is actually a ‘cool’ guy! Holger, he said, reiterated that the past commitment to the growth of Rotary by its leadership team has failed, this in large part because there has been insufficient emphasis on the encouragement of existing members to fully engage, and a failure to strengthen the membership for the future, perhaps by way of not centralizing to a sufficient degree for concentrated effort. But, and this seems clear, when the efforts are collectively exerted, they work … witness PolioPlus.
 
Continuing, Dave emphasized that, as a complete enterprise, Rotary is in wonderful shape; it is financially strong and and still growing in numbers every year. But it is now established that the Asian membership is larger than that of North America, a fact which actually reflects the reality of the world’s demographics and the dramatic effect of a rapidly ageing U.S. population. Holger had made the point to him that at a recent meeting, a leadership group had been addressed by the President of Kodak, a giant in the photographic world in the last century, but which is now in bankruptcy because of a corporate belief that the company would get into other fields as time passed and that it was too dominant to fail; however, the pace of digital changes was so rapid that it easily outpaced Kodak’s ability to accommodate itself to the profound changes in technology and popular culture. The lesson is radical in its simplicity: Rotary, aware of this profound change in its weltanshauung, has to be nimble to thrive in this febrile world. 
 
The consequent need for flexibility and manoeuvrability can in part be alleviated by creating new Club formats, examples of which are ‘Passport’, Corporate, ‘Cause-based’ and ‘Alumni’ clubs, which, because of technology (vide, what we were using for this meeting!) can have as few as 8 members and as many as 20, and simply do not need to meet in a traditional setting and munch through lunch. Our DG takes the reasonable view that 5040 is soundly based and historically strong, in large part because of the efforts of members such as Leigh and Hans, who fortuitously (sic) were with us for this meeting. The centre of the year is of course the District Conference, which this year is slated for Terrace during the May long weekend. Necessarily, the very holding of the event is in some peril because of the Pandemic, but at present it is planned to closely liase with the Nisga’a peoples and utilize the consequent ready access to the Nass Valley to as great a degree as is practical.
 
A forceful talk ended with the aphorism “It’s Time To Make A Change” … but more specifically “What would I do differently if I were to start a Rotary Club today?” I anticipate that President Grant will pose that question to some unsuspecting member at some future meeting.
 
Speaker Introduction by Shail: Born and raised in Vancouver, Allen was elected as a five-term Vancouver Park Board Commissioner from 1993 to 2008.  He was deeply involved in the devastating Windstorm Clean up* and has a long association with the Chinatown Business Association. 
 
*The 2006 storm that destroyed a section of Vancouver’s iconic Stanley Park with hurricane-force winds that ripped through and levelled 41 hectares of forest. On Dec. 15, 2006, the park, boasts old growth conifers several centuries old, lost more than 10,000 trees.
 
In 2017, Allan was appointed by the Minister of Defence as a 3rd Canadian Division Honorary Lieutenant - Colonel with the Canadian Forces 15th Field Artillery Regiment (RCA). With this position, he is working to help bridge the gap between the military and the society it defends.
 
He is the founding member and President of the Honour House Society, a non-profit that began 10 years ago. The facilities are a refuge and a home away from home for Canadian Forces personnel, first responders like police, paramedics and firefighters, and their families.  
 
A SERVICE FOR FIRST RESPONDERS AND MILITARY PERSONNEL
 
Honour house and Honour Ranch are places to stay while healing occurs.  At these two facilities, personnel from high stress positions can find help to recover knowing that, at a place close by, a degree of family life can be maintained.
 
Honour Houseis located in New Westminster and Honour Ranchis located near Cache Creek. The facilities are available to those struggling with PTSD and other conditions that need special intervention and time for healing.  Their services are also available to volunteers who work with the military and first responders; in fact they are accessible to all front-line-serving personnel.  
 
Funding for the facilities and their personnel comes from an endowment set up for this purpose.  The facilities are run, between 75-80%, by volunteers.  Professional medical and other necessary service providers are paid by the various agencies to which personnel are attached.
 
The facilities and their services are relatively new and Col. De Genova would appreciate Rotarians throughout the region to letting others know that this service is available at no cost to all men and women who access them due to the stress of their work in the military or as first responders.
 
As he says, we have lost too many good people to suicide due to PTSD and work-related stress. 
 
HONOUR HOUSE IN NEW WESTMINSTER
 
HONOUR RANCH IN CACHE CREEK
 
Rotary Club of Vancouver Arbutus donated  $2,000 to The Aboriginal Mother Centre Society to assist the good work being done by them.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
AMCS’ story/motivation:
The Aboriginal Mother Centre Society (AMCS) began in 2002 to address the needs of Aboriginal women that were seen falling through the cracks. There was (and still is) a large number of children in care of the Ministry of Children and Family Development or Vancouver Aboriginal Child and Family Services and so a small group was formed to try and address these concerns. AMCS is located in East Vancouver.
 
Since COVID-19 happened they have been on the frontlines dealing directly with the vulnerable populations including feeding 200-400 people everyday in the Downtown Eastside Monday-Friday, supporting people to find housing, offering tents, providing cultural supports, and taking care of elders by providing them with weekly food deliveries.
 
Range of programs and services:
AMCS provides Transitional Housing which offers shelter, support, and programs for women and children, so they are given an opportunity of healing and family reconnection, and live in a healthy self-sustaining village that supports women, children, and families. With all this under one roof, the AMCS has the capacity to deliver on-site programming with a traditional Indigenous knowledge centered approach. This approach to spiritual, physical, and emotional health includes counseling, advocacy, education, training, and social support
 
AMCS is a place where Aboriginal mothers, who are facing homelessness and/or dealing with their children in the care of the Ministry, can come to stay. The women can rebuild their sense of self-worth and identity for a better future for themselves and their children.  AMCS is a place where they can come to be together as a family.  This place would be the best fitting for babies, children, and mothers, anybody who is coming through a block in their life.
 
AMCS offers an Outreach Program that provides support to those that are homeless or are at risk of homelessness by providing wrap around services and supporting men, women, and families to find and sustain housing within the community. They offer support to Elders within the community and host an Elders luncheon every Thursday (which is currently on hold due to COVID).  AMCS also has a 25-space daycare for children ages 2-5years that focuses on culture, language, and traditions.
 
Importance of the work AMC does to the people/communities they serve:
The importance of the work they do is to help indigenous people overcome barriers such as homelessness, addiction, mental health, discrimination, systemic racism, and oppression. They support women by providing cultural, educational, and preventative measures to keep families together. The Centre also addresses historical traumas and provides culturally relevant and anti-oppression support. They are one of the only indigenous societies within this community to provide a safe haven to families to get the support they need in a wrap around service.
 
Traditional territory recognition:
Aboriginal Mother Centre have the honor and privilege of working on the Unceded Traditional Territories of the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh First Nations, one that they do not take lightly and are committed to honoring them through the work
 
 
 
The Vancouver Fruit Tree Project is in the full swing of things and they have already rescued over 1,000 pounds of fruit! 
 
They have been busy finding creative solutions to increasing rates of food insecurity.   For example, they have partnered with Vancouver Fruit Runners to increase their ability to distribute fruit to Community Partners.
 
They also have more volunteers taking on leadership roles as Fruit Rescue Team Leads.   Many of these volunteers use Modo Car-Share account to transport equipment and fruit.  As such, they will use some of the remaining funds donated by the Rotary Club of Vancouver Arbutus to cover the Modo transportation costs.
 
 
Rotary Club of Vancouver Arbutus welcomes Madhu.  
 
 
Madhu was born in Calcutta - now known by its traditional name of Kolkata - which is located in the eastern State of Bengal in India.  Kolkata is historically known for its strategic location on the delta of the mighty river Ganges. The city is also recognized as a centre of knowledge, poetry, music, arts and culture.
 
Family move from Kolkata to her paternal grandparents’ estate in the Indian State of Bihar (near the Indo Nepal border) led to the very best days of her childhood - adored by her grandparents, spending days in fruit orchards, fields of fresh vegetables and her pets were calves as her grandparents farm had hundreds of dairy cows.   It was a sad day when her parents decided to move to New Delhi.  She had to leave behind everyone and everything she loved.  In New Delhi, she focused on her education, which culminated in undergrad in Economics Honors and graduate degree in Business Economics from the University of Delhi. 
 
Madhu went on to work in strategic planning, regulatory and transformational change management primarily in the engineering and energy sectors with multinational companies in South Asia, USA, Germany and Australia.  She has also been a Trade Commissioner for Canada for the S&T, ICT and Natural Resources sectors.  As well, she was a Trustee and a member of the Management Committee of her grandparent’s Trust for education and vocational training for the visually challenged which still remains a big health concern in India. 
 
Madhu and her husband Ramesh Kamath - a family physician - moved to Canada in 2009 because their families and friends were spread mainly across North America and they had very few close contacts left in India!  While Dr. Kamath worked in St. Paul’s Hospital, Madhu busied herself with executive management courses in Aboriginal Business and Leadership from Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University to respectfully understand Canadian indigenous peoples' cultures and traditions. She also became a founding member of the International Trade Committee of the Vancouver Board of Trade.  Move from Vancouver to Fort St. John in north eastern BC was a 'life experience'.  In FSJ, she worked as Director (Strategic Analysis) and Compliance Management for BC Oil and Gas Commission.  They returned to the Lower Mainland in the summer of 2016.  
 
Their children graduated from McGill University before spreading their wings!  Gaurav is passionate about finance and investment.  Gaurav’s wife Laurie is a legal counsel with the British Museum.  While they live and work in London, they are avid world travellers and enjoy hiking in the English countryside.  Nikhil is in San Francisco and loves the Bay Area!  Though he does data analytics as a profession he is quite an entrepreneur. 
 
Madhu enjoys classical Indian and contemporary dance forms. She completed a course in Survey and History of Art in the last 1000 years from Emily Carr University to have a deeper understanding of how western art and architecture over the centuries has been shaped by ancient cultures and civilizations.  She also practices a Buddhist quiet style of meditation called Vipassana.   Madhu and Ramesh love traveling and getting immersed in various cultures by spending time with the local people, and enjoying their foods, music and arts. 
 
Why Rotary? 
 
Rotary International in India has always been highly respected, which has led to the creation of many Clubs in small and large towns, and mega cities over the last decades.   Giving back to vulnerable communities requiring assistance (but not surprisingly) combined with socializing and networking over a meal are strong cultural Indian traits.  This has attributed to exponentially increase membership in Rotary in India.  Since members of Madhu’s extended family are dedicated Rotarians, she grew up understanding and appreciating the spirit of giving through Rotary International.  Madhu was inducted as a Rotarian in Rotary Club of Yaletown in November 2016 but she had to pause her Rotary life in July 2019 due to personal reasons.  While she was a member, she was asked to join as a facilitator in the District 5040 Strategic Planning Team in 2017-2018 by PDG Late Don Evans; and later was nominated District Trainer for District 5040 for year 2020-2021 by now DG  Dave Hamilton and subsequently completed the District Trainers’ training program at PETS in Seattle in 2019.  Madhu is also a graduate of Rotary Leadership Institute’s training program.
 

 
Rotary Masks
Grant bought "rotary masks" from Fraserview club.   Masks were sold for $20 as fundraiser.   To support local business, they bought from a supplier at Granville Island.  However, it turns out that they are actually made in China.  
 
Project Committee
Dianna is looking for project committee members.  Please contact Dianna if you can help.  
 
Foundation
Annual fund goal for this year is $2,700.  Polio fund goal is $1,400.   Please donate generously.  
 
Speedy Recovery
Teddie had gall bladder surgery.   Surgery was a success.  It was reported that she was eating bacon & eggs the next day.  We wish her a speedy recovery.  
 
August 7th Zoom meeting
You should have received the link via email from rcvancouverarbutus@outlook.com on Aug 4th.  Link is also at our club's web page at https://portal.clubrunner.ca/778.
 
 
 
August 14th in person meeting
You should have received the address via email from rcvancouverarbutus@outlook.com on Aug 4th.  Walk along the hedge on right (west) side of house.  Go through gate and keep walking to back yard.  Garage door to car port will be open so people can also access the back yard from lane between 14th & 15th.  
 
Bring
   - your mask
   - your own food
   - your own drinks
   - your own chair, if you can.  There will be some chairs but not enough for everyone.  
 
 
Arbutus Club is no longer an option for future in person meeting venue for the Rotary Club of Vancouver Arbutus.  Club officers are exploring possible new meeting locations.   
 
Season’s in Park, at Queen Elizabeth Park
Grant joined Rotary Club of Vancouver Fraserview meeting.  RCVF meet in person every other week at Season’s in Park.  They do not Zoom.  Attendees prepay $29.50 per person online. Lunch menu had variety of 6-7 item to choose from.  Room was nice with 5 round tables, with 6 chairs per table.  Quality of food and service was good. Drinks are extra payable to restaurant.  Parking is $7 for 2 hours.  
 
Legion, at Broadway & Alma 
Not open till 3pm.  

St. James Community Square, at 10th & Trutch
Reasonable room rental rate.  Easily accessible by bus.  
 
If you know of other potential venues for the club, please contact President Grant.  
The Coronavirus DID NOT STOP the following Vancouver ROTARY Clubs  and Retractors from Helping Kids!
  • Rotary Club of Vancouver
  • Rotary Club of Vancouver Arbutus 
  • Rotary Club of Vancouver Fraserview
  • Rotary Club of Vancouver Sunrise
  • Rotary Club of Vancouver Yaletown
  • Vancouver Young Professionals Rotaract Club
 
Since 2007 the ROTARY Hoop-A-Thon Project has raised over $415,000 supporting Youth Leadership initiatives in Vancouver.  
 
Thanks to Rotarians, friends, family, Corporate Donors, The HoopLaw Tournament (www.hooplaw.net) and the Vancouver Basketball Foundation (https://www.vancouverbasketball.org) we were able to exceed last year’s receipts!  Hoop-A-Thon 2020 raised over $52,000.  Money raised helped kids as:
  • Scholarships: $35,000
  • Strathcona Basketball Program: $8,190
  • Rotary Youth Leadership Training (RYLA): $4,000
  • Girls who LEAP: (Lead, Empower, Act with Purpose): $5,000
 
Home Page Stories
Our club will be partnering with the Rotary Club of Bulindo, and other clubs from our district to bring washrooms to a remote area in Uganda. Safe, underground water will be pumped to a 30,000 liter tank installed at the top of a hill and will provide hand washing and toilet blocks for the community of 5000 and 437 students in the primary school. The mission statement of the Rotary Club of Bulindo is "A voluntary organization that will bring a smile to the vulnerable".
 
 
 
 
 
Welcome to The 2021 Strathcona ROTARY Youth Leadership
HOOP-A-THON!
 
Presented by Vancouver Rotary Clubs, Rotaractors & Interactors:
 
 
ROTARY Club of Vancouver Sunrise, ROTARY Club of Vancouver Yaletown, ROTARY Club of Vancouver, ROTARY Club of Vancouver Arbutus and ROTARY Club of Vancouver Mountainview. We are also supported by the Vancouver Young Professionals Rotaract Club and King George and Point Grey Interactors.
 
We will be holding a safe, socially distanced event with only a few people participating, however the event will be available to our supporters via Zoom online.
 
HOOP-A-THON Date: Saturday, April 24, 2021 (9:00 am)
 
YOU ARE INVITED!  Join us on ZOOM. Here is your Link:
 
 
HELP US HELP THE KIDS! Make a DONATION NOW and receive an instant Tax Receipt:
 
Watch Global BC News coverage of one of our pre-Covid Events:
 
 
Our speaker on the fine Friday was Allan Lingwood, presently of the Victoria Rotary Club and in many respects also an appropriate representative of the Saanich and Oak Bay Clubs, the three of which having effectively combined to assist in the development of disadvantaged segments of society in Uganda.
 
 
On Friday we were pleased to welcome to our Zoom forum Ms. Carolyn Daley. The author of “Vancouver’s Women in Blue”, she spoke with authority of the rise of the female component of the Vancouver Police Force (the book is available from Ruddy Duck Press). She retired from the force after serving for 28 years and retiring as deputy chief constable, at the time the highest rank achieved by a woman in that force.
 
The story of women in the force is not one that has been entirely favourable to the history of the force. There has however in the past few years been a dramatic increase in both the number and the reputation of a force that now represents a solid front to the community. She spoke of the gender-based double standards of women that characterized the role of women in the past (now quite a long past, the first woman police officer being appointed in 1904). There have been issues in the past with respect to the Police Officers Physical Abilities Test (POPAT), which is fundamental to both genders, as both sexes are required to be able to meet exacting standards of the real hazards of the profession, but there are no longer any disputes as to the ability of women to attain those standards.
 
Naturally, not all was (and is?) clear sailing. Carolyn spoke of the real tensions occasionally arising because of the wives of police officers being somewhat against women being in the same force as were their husbands, a situation with which she had to deal while being in such a high leadership position.  In answer to a question from the audience, she frankly said that such divisive matters have occurred, but that public a acceptance of the role of women in the force now seems established. 
 
Altogether a balanced and erudite discussion, but one that rather impelled the listeners to seek out the book (running to 286 pages, one suspects that it is a full and unembroidered story). 
 
 
 
 
One of our club's volunteer opportunities each year is to assist with selling live Christmas trees to benefit youth at risk.  It was a very busy Saturday and each tree needs to have it's trunk cut.  There will be a few sore shoulder's in the morning!
 
Diwali (also called Divali or Deepavali) is a “festival of lights” that celebrates the triumph of light over dark and good over evil, and the blessings of victory, freedom, and enlightenment.  Though technically religious, it’s also become a cultural event in North America that is celebrated with sweets and special foods. 
 
Coinciding with the Hindu New Year, Diwali occurs annually in autumn, during the Hindu month of Kartik. Which begins around mid-October and ends in mid-November.  Specifically, Diwali occurs on the darkest day of the lunar month, which is the day of the new Moon.
 
 
Who celebrates Diwali?
 
Hindus, Sikhs and Jains celebrate the holiday.  
 
Hindus celebrate the legend of the return of the Hindu god Rama and his wife, Sita, to their northern India kingdom of Ayodhya.  The legend says Rama and Sita were exiled for 14 years during which Rama defeated the demon king Ravanna.  Some honour Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth, during Diwali.  
 
In Jainism, it marks the spiritual awakening of Lord Mahavira, a venerated ascetic who fundamentally reformed the faith, reaching a state of nirvana after his death. 
 
For Sikhs, it marks the day that Guru Hargobind Ji, the Sixth Sikh Guru, was freed from imprisonment.
 
 
How do people celebrate Diwali?
 
Because Diwali is celebrated by so many people worldwide, traditions are diverse, though there are a few common themes, including the lighting of candles and the gathering of families.
 
The main celebration of Diwali takes place on the day of the new moon, when the sky is at its darkest, so a big part of the celebration revolves around light.  Candles, clay lamps, and oil lanterns are lit and placed throughout the home, in the streets, in areas of worship, and floated on lakes and rivers.  Fireworks are also set off on the night of Diwali—said by some to ward off evil spirits.
 
Another central theme of Diwali is family. Wearing their best new clothes, families gather together to eat sweets and other special foods, light diyas (decorative oil lamps), and pray for their ancestors.  
 
The feast can be quite extravagant, with the table filled with special dishes and sweets. 
 
five days of celebrations 
  1. On the first day the house is cleaned and rangoli (intricate designs made of colored rice, sand, or flowersare created on the floor of the home.
  2. On the second day special sweets, called mithaiare prepared or bought.   As well, prayer for the spirits of ancestors in the afterlife are conducted.
  3. On the third day, the main day of Diwali, families gather and celebrate by lighting lanterns and candles in their homes and in the streets, and by shooting off fireworks! 
  4. Traditions of the fourth day vary, but a common theme is the bond between husband and wife, so husbands will often buy their spouses gifts to celebrate.
  5. The fifth day focuses on the bond between siblings, specifically between brother and sister. 
      
 
Diwali during Covid-19 pandemic
 
  • Diwali celebrations this year took place under restrictive measures, including mask wearing and physical distancing.
  • Many temples streamed prayer sessions online to avoid large gatherings.
  • Around the world, worried residents opted for low-key celebrations.  Many stayed home and did not visit friends or relatives.  
 
The project began in a conversation between Ron, one of our newest Rotarians, and a Deacon in Victoria.  He mentioned that during a meal program at Christ Church Cathedral in Vancouver they sometimes gave out hats, gloves, and socks if they receive a random donation; but nothing was structured.  What a good idea, Ron thought and, being a man of action, he promptly called the Maundy Café at Christ Church.   They were very excited and said yes, they know where the need is greatest and would love to participate with us.   Ron brought this to the Projects Committee at Rotary Arbutus and it was approved in a flash.  
 
Next Ron and his partner Judith established a list of contents that are most needed and then Ron set about finding suppliers that could donate or provide items at the lowest prices.  The Club and its members would cover the costs. Ron personally covered $250 worth of items.  Next came the making up of “packages”.  With a ban on indoor gatherings due to the pandemic, Ron and Judith did all the assembly themselves.  
 
 
 
Here is Ron’s latest report: 
“Hello fellow Rotarians, and friends: As promised, here is the update and information on the Sock Project. As of today, November 19th, I am pleased to report that the socks and purses (for ladies) are complete. A very special thanks to Yoonhi for accessing the purses (notEuropean Man Bags) for the ladies, and to my lovely partner and Victoria Rotarian Judy (from across the Salish Sea) for lending a woman's touch to the whole process! There are 16 purses and 44 Socks! The only thing left is to coordinate with Vienne at the Maundy Cafe as to the best date for dropping the goods off  and we are just firming up how they would decide who gets the purses and socks.
 
They are very enthusiastic about the project, and I see this being expanded to at least double next year. I will ask them to get a couple of photos at the Cafe on the days they are handing out the purses and socks. 
 
From a personal note, I have found this to be a very interesting and satisfying little project. I look forward to being able to do this with the involvement of more of our fellow Rotarians in the future once the Pandemic is under better control. Thank you for the privilege of being a part of Rotary and for all your kind assistance. If you wish a complete list of what is in the socks and purses, please let me know and I will forward it separately. 
Kindest regards, Ron Fulton
 
PS As to the contents in the socks and purses, Judy and I would love to expand the programme using medium sized backpacks that would accommodate more items, including small fleece blankets. We did put Ikea fleece coverups in the purses this year for the women. Thank you for all your guidance.
 
 
The subject of today’s presentation was the cautionary tale of a legal imbroglio that was to be played out upon your correspondent, a scam with which a number of our members were already acquainted, but whose lesson is worth repeating in this forum.  It took place on October 16th, the morning when I had to attend a procedure at VGH at 7am. This fact resulted in my returning home before 9 o’clock. There I found my wife, deeply distressed, talking on the phone to our eldest grandson, who was evidently in jail by virtue of an impaired driving offence, in which a lamp-post had been badly damaged and he had been ordered to come up with $12,000, before noon, otherwise he would be incarcerated for considerable period of time: he, equally distressed, was crying on the other end of the phone, and elicited from his grandmother a promise not to tell his father, who is a lawyer with a corporate practice, but with very little practical criminal experience (that part was similar to my type of legal practice … i.e. scant experience in the criminal courts).
 
A few moments before I arrived Judith had had a call from the lawyer who had ‘managed to get the court to agree that a $12,000 deposit would fix the immediate problem’.  I phoned him (a 403 number) and told him that I was a retired lawyer, but wished to retain one of my past partners to look after the situation, a comment that elicited a most rude response from the ‘David Mason’, who I was about to tell was acting most unprofessionally when he rudely tole me that he would drop the case and slammed his phone down.  I phoned my old partner, and he referred me to an old friend of our firm’s, who took hold of the problem, phoned around to the courts and their registries and called back to tell me that no Logan Frost had been arrested over the weekend and that this was clearly a scam of some considerable, but flawed, skill.  We phoned our son, he being at home because of Covid, who was able to tell us that Logan was asleep in his room, and had certainly not been drinking or arrested over the weekend.
 
The lesson here is clear: when Judith was first called, the person on the other end of the line was weeping unconsolably, and she reasonably said “is that you, Logan?” This was all that the scammer really needed to know, his voice being unrecognizable given his extreme 'distress'.  Fortunately, I had enough nounce to call those who could help, even though I was obviously operating on low wattage, and the schema was, in retrospect, shambolic and ill-thought-through.  But we know of two other instances in the past where a similar modus operandi has been tried, once with success.  And if 2 to 3% of these calls work, somebody can make a pile of money: the mantra must be “keep calm”! 
 
 
I cannot let this opportunity to proselytize pass without making a comment about the disturbing news received over the weekend wherein a major food retailer prohibited its employees wearing the poppy over the coming Remembrance Day, a stricture apparently rescinded only a day or two after being pronounced.  But it is easy to forget what this symbol means to our society, and, if anyone wishes to do so, a commentary can be found in the book “Douglas Haig: From the Somme to Victory” by Gary Sheffield.  From here we learn that the British Legion acquired the symbolic red Flanders poppy in large part because of John McRae’s poem ‘In Flanders Fields’.  The Legion, partly created because of Field Marshal Haig’s concern respecting the vast numbers of unemployed and abandoned soldiers, though hesitant to adopt the symbol, finally agreed in August 1921 to the creation of a Poppy Day on the anniversary of Armistice Day.  “The first Poppy Day was a huge success” the book records, and by 1926 disabled servicemen were employed in a factory that “manufactured 25 millions poppies a year”.  It became in 1921 "an instant tradition”.  It is difficult to declare now whether the pandemic will lessen or increase the popular respect for this institution … one suspects that it might well result in even greater relevance, though the availability of the poppies themselves today seems quite  restricted, if only because of the absence of retired servicemen to sell them in shopping arenas.  It is interesting to note that the parade at the Cenotaph was first broadcast in 1927 by the fledgling BBC: that tradition now seems an intrinsic part of each passing year.
 
 
Today we were pleased to welcome Maura from the Aboriginal Mothers’ Centre Society.  She is a Dene, born in Yellowknife NWT.  As a proud mum of 5 boys, she is honoured and privileged to live on the Unceded Traditional Territories of the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh First Nation.  Maura directed herself into the AMCS via being brought up in a foster home, facing being a high-school dropout, and statements to her face that she had “no future” before her, she recently completed her Masters degree in Social Work, and thereby became devoted to keeping families intact and hopeful for the future.  One can readily appreciate that this is a difficult enough task within that community by itself, but that the hurdles have escalated because of the pandemic almost goes without saying.
 

The difficulties that the Society face are obviously formidable, one of the first to be faced being a slide into dependancy that is unfortunately so characteristic in many small and remote communities.  Maura has intimate acquaintance with the limitations of resources to assist the large number of persons who now cannot easily be assisted at all (the Society’s doors have had to be closed, she hopes temporarily, to seniors in obvious need) as the need is growing to render assistance in providing food to the needy, and to address the well-publicized desperation of those who overdose, a need often mollified by the rather simple expedient of simply spending time with those in need and those who have often given up hope.
 
The Society’s facilities have been put under further stress by the recent need for all of the case workers to have to spend two weeks in isolation as they are faced with 15 positive Covid sufferers, and yet have to provide over 200 meals a day to others who rely upon such assistance merely to survive.  She made the point that probably needed to be made, this being that the Society now not only looks after indigenous clients, but actively assists in providing assistance to other groups and organizations that have become hamstrung themselves because of the pandemic hitting their helpers and staff.  Fortunately, valuable assistance to the the Society has been provided by the Food Banks … although most of us are now quite aware of the difficulties that those centres themselves face a shortage of supplies and staff.
 
Upon being asked what items are most needed, Maura indicated that coats, blankets and socks (the latter of which always appear very high on the list of needs for those at the trail end of society, but which last so short a time for those who need warm and dry feet) are always in demand. The place to deposit such things, especially before the coming cold weather, is 2019 Dundas. A moving and effective talk.  
 
 
 
These assorted hats were knit by Grandma Ella to reduce stress during Covid.  They were appreciated at the Aboriginal Mother's Centre which has transitional housing for 16 Mom's and 32 Children.  Winter is coming!
 
         
 
We were pleased to welcome, albeit in unique format, District Governor Dave Hamilton, who was introduced by Assistant DG John Bathurst … who did so at justifiable length, especially as we were also introduced to Dave’s wife, who gloried under the soubriquet ‘Galaxy’, is herself next year’s President of the Sunshine Coast Club, and apparently painted away at home, unseen by the meeting, until introduced by her husband, at which time we found that she really was painting all the while! In fact, quite a few of us had already met Dave in the days when we could meet and greet over fish, chips and wine … may those days soon return!
 
Recently, when returning home from a conference, Dave and his wife found themselves in an airport departure lounge, and sitting there the current Rotary International President, Holger Knaack, whom he described as a ‘cool-looking guy’. Dave took the opportunity to have a brief chat (one doesn’t want to be too liberal in intruding upon another’s privacy) and followed a brief description with an excerpt from a video recorded by Holger: and plainly he is actually a ‘cool’ guy! Holger, he said, reiterated that the past commitment to the growth of Rotary by its leadership team has failed, this in large part because there has been insufficient emphasis on the encouragement of existing members to fully engage, and a failure to strengthen the membership for the future, perhaps by way of not centralizing to a sufficient degree for concentrated effort. But, and this seems clear, when the efforts are collectively exerted, they work … witness PolioPlus.
 
Continuing, Dave emphasized that, as a complete enterprise, Rotary is in wonderful shape; it is financially strong and and still growing in numbers every year. But it is now established that the Asian membership is larger than that of North America, a fact which actually reflects the reality of the world’s demographics and the dramatic effect of a rapidly ageing U.S. population. Holger had made the point to him that at a recent meeting, a leadership group had been addressed by the President of Kodak, a giant in the photographic world in the last century, but which is now in bankruptcy because of a corporate belief that the company would get into other fields as time passed and that it was too dominant to fail; however, the pace of digital changes was so rapid that it easily outpaced Kodak’s ability to accommodate itself to the profound changes in technology and popular culture. The lesson is radical in its simplicity: Rotary, aware of this profound change in its weltanshauung, has to be nimble to thrive in this febrile world. 
 
The consequent need for flexibility and manoeuvrability can in part be alleviated by creating new Club formats, examples of which are ‘Passport’, Corporate, ‘Cause-based’ and ‘Alumni’ clubs, which, because of technology (vide, what we were using for this meeting!) can have as few as 8 members and as many as 20, and simply do not need to meet in a traditional setting and munch through lunch. Our DG takes the reasonable view that 5040 is soundly based and historically strong, in large part because of the efforts of members such as Leigh and Hans, who fortuitously (sic) were with us for this meeting. The centre of the year is of course the District Conference, which this year is slated for Terrace during the May long weekend. Necessarily, the very holding of the event is in some peril because of the Pandemic, but at present it is planned to closely liase with the Nisga’a peoples and utilize the consequent ready access to the Nass Valley to as great a degree as is practical.
 
A forceful talk ended with the aphorism “It’s Time To Make A Change” … but more specifically “What would I do differently if I were to start a Rotary Club today?” I anticipate that President Grant will pose that question to some unsuspecting member at some future meeting.
 
Speaker Introduction by Shail: Born and raised in Vancouver, Allen was elected as a five-term Vancouver Park Board Commissioner from 1993 to 2008.  He was deeply involved in the devastating Windstorm Clean up* and has a long association with the Chinatown Business Association. 
 
*The 2006 storm that destroyed a section of Vancouver’s iconic Stanley Park with hurricane-force winds that ripped through and levelled 41 hectares of forest. On Dec. 15, 2006, the park, boasts old growth conifers several centuries old, lost more than 10,000 trees.
 
In 2017, Allan was appointed by the Minister of Defence as a 3rd Canadian Division Honorary Lieutenant - Colonel with the Canadian Forces 15th Field Artillery Regiment (RCA). With this position, he is working to help bridge the gap between the military and the society it defends.
 
He is the founding member and President of the Honour House Society, a non-profit that began 10 years ago. The facilities are a refuge and a home away from home for Canadian Forces personnel, first responders like police, paramedics and firefighters, and their families.  
 
A SERVICE FOR FIRST RESPONDERS AND MILITARY PERSONNEL
 
Honour house and Honour Ranch are places to stay while healing occurs.  At these two facilities, personnel from high stress positions can find help to recover knowing that, at a place close by, a degree of family life can be maintained.
 
Honour Houseis located in New Westminster and Honour Ranchis located near Cache Creek. The facilities are available to those struggling with PTSD and other conditions that need special intervention and time for healing.  Their services are also available to volunteers who work with the military and first responders; in fact they are accessible to all front-line-serving personnel.  
 
Funding for the facilities and their personnel comes from an endowment set up for this purpose.  The facilities are run, between 75-80%, by volunteers.  Professional medical and other necessary service providers are paid by the various agencies to which personnel are attached.
 
The facilities and their services are relatively new and Col. De Genova would appreciate Rotarians throughout the region to letting others know that this service is available at no cost to all men and women who access them due to the stress of their work in the military or as first responders.
 
As he says, we have lost too many good people to suicide due to PTSD and work-related stress. 
 
HONOUR HOUSE IN NEW WESTMINSTER
 
HONOUR RANCH IN CACHE CREEK
 
Rotary Club of Vancouver Arbutus donated  $2,000 to The Aboriginal Mother Centre Society to assist the good work being done by them.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
AMCS’ story/motivation:
The Aboriginal Mother Centre Society (AMCS) began in 2002 to address the needs of Aboriginal women that were seen falling through the cracks. There was (and still is) a large number of children in care of the Ministry of Children and Family Development or Vancouver Aboriginal Child and Family Services and so a small group was formed to try and address these concerns. AMCS is located in East Vancouver.
 
Since COVID-19 happened they have been on the frontlines dealing directly with the vulnerable populations including feeding 200-400 people everyday in the Downtown Eastside Monday-Friday, supporting people to find housing, offering tents, providing cultural supports, and taking care of elders by providing them with weekly food deliveries.
 
Range of programs and services:
AMCS provides Transitional Housing which offers shelter, support, and programs for women and children, so they are given an opportunity of healing and family reconnection, and live in a healthy self-sustaining village that supports women, children, and families. With all this under one roof, the AMCS has the capacity to deliver on-site programming with a traditional Indigenous knowledge centered approach. This approach to spiritual, physical, and emotional health includes counseling, advocacy, education, training, and social support
 
AMCS is a place where Aboriginal mothers, who are facing homelessness and/or dealing with their children in the care of the Ministry, can come to stay. The women can rebuild their sense of self-worth and identity for a better future for themselves and their children.  AMCS is a place where they can come to be together as a family.  This place would be the best fitting for babies, children, and mothers, anybody who is coming through a block in their life.
 
AMCS offers an Outreach Program that provides support to those that are homeless or are at risk of homelessness by providing wrap around services and supporting men, women, and families to find and sustain housing within the community. They offer support to Elders within the community and host an Elders luncheon every Thursday (which is currently on hold due to COVID).  AMCS also has a 25-space daycare for children ages 2-5years that focuses on culture, language, and traditions.
 
Importance of the work AMC does to the people/communities they serve:
The importance of the work they do is to help indigenous people overcome barriers such as homelessness, addiction, mental health, discrimination, systemic racism, and oppression. They support women by providing cultural, educational, and preventative measures to keep families together. The Centre also addresses historical traumas and provides culturally relevant and anti-oppression support. They are one of the only indigenous societies within this community to provide a safe haven to families to get the support they need in a wrap around service.
 
Traditional territory recognition:
Aboriginal Mother Centre have the honor and privilege of working on the Unceded Traditional Territories of the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh First Nations, one that they do not take lightly and are committed to honoring them through the work
 
 
 
The Vancouver Fruit Tree Project is in the full swing of things and they have already rescued over 1,000 pounds of fruit! 
 
They have been busy finding creative solutions to increasing rates of food insecurity.   For example, they have partnered with Vancouver Fruit Runners to increase their ability to distribute fruit to Community Partners.
 
They also have more volunteers taking on leadership roles as Fruit Rescue Team Leads.   Many of these volunteers use Modo Car-Share account to transport equipment and fruit.  As such, they will use some of the remaining funds donated by the Rotary Club of Vancouver Arbutus to cover the Modo transportation costs.
 
 
Rotary Club of Vancouver Arbutus welcomes Madhu.  
 
 
Madhu was born in Calcutta - now known by its traditional name of Kolkata - which is located in the eastern State of Bengal in India.  Kolkata is historically known for its strategic location on the delta of the mighty river Ganges. The city is also recognized as a centre of knowledge, poetry, music, arts and culture.
 
Family move from Kolkata to her paternal grandparents’ estate in the Indian State of Bihar (near the Indo Nepal border) led to the very best days of her childhood - adored by her grandparents, spending days in fruit orchards, fields of fresh vegetables and her pets were calves as her grandparents farm had hundreds of dairy cows.   It was a sad day when her parents decided to move to New Delhi.  She had to leave behind everyone and everything she loved.  In New Delhi, she focused on her education, which culminated in undergrad in Economics Honors and graduate degree in Business Economics from the University of Delhi. 
 
Madhu went on to work in strategic planning, regulatory and transformational change management primarily in the engineering and energy sectors with multinational companies in South Asia, USA, Germany and Australia.  She has also been a Trade Commissioner for Canada for the S&T, ICT and Natural Resources sectors.  As well, she was a Trustee and a member of the Management Committee of her grandparent’s Trust for education and vocational training for the visually challenged which still remains a big health concern in India. 
 
Madhu and her husband Ramesh Kamath - a family physician - moved to Canada in 2009 because their families and friends were spread mainly across North America and they had very few close contacts left in India!  While Dr. Kamath worked in St. Paul’s Hospital, Madhu busied herself with executive management courses in Aboriginal Business and Leadership from Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University to respectfully understand Canadian indigenous peoples' cultures and traditions. She also became a founding member of the International Trade Committee of the Vancouver Board of Trade.  Move from Vancouver to Fort St. John in north eastern BC was a 'life experience'.  In FSJ, she worked as Director (Strategic Analysis) and Compliance Management for BC Oil and Gas Commission.  They returned to the Lower Mainland in the summer of 2016.  
 
Their children graduated from McGill University before spreading their wings!  Gaurav is passionate about finance and investment.  Gaurav’s wife Laurie is a legal counsel with the British Museum.  While they live and work in London, they are avid world travellers and enjoy hiking in the English countryside.  Nikhil is in San Francisco and loves the Bay Area!  Though he does data analytics as a profession he is quite an entrepreneur. 
 
Madhu enjoys classical Indian and contemporary dance forms. She completed a course in Survey and History of Art in the last 1000 years from Emily Carr University to have a deeper understanding of how western art and architecture over the centuries has been shaped by ancient cultures and civilizations.  She also practices a Buddhist quiet style of meditation called Vipassana.   Madhu and Ramesh love traveling and getting immersed in various cultures by spending time with the local people, and enjoying their foods, music and arts. 
 
Why Rotary? 
 
Rotary International in India has always been highly respected, which has led to the creation of many Clubs in small and large towns, and mega cities over the last decades.   Giving back to vulnerable communities requiring assistance (but not surprisingly) combined with socializing and networking over a meal are strong cultural Indian traits.  This has attributed to exponentially increase membership in Rotary in India.  Since members of Madhu’s extended family are dedicated Rotarians, she grew up understanding and appreciating the spirit of giving through Rotary International.  Madhu was inducted as a Rotarian in Rotary Club of Yaletown in November 2016 but she had to pause her Rotary life in July 2019 due to personal reasons.  While she was a member, she was asked to join as a facilitator in the District 5040 Strategic Planning Team in 2017-2018 by PDG Late Don Evans; and later was nominated District Trainer for District 5040 for year 2020-2021 by now DG  Dave Hamilton and subsequently completed the District Trainers’ training program at PETS in Seattle in 2019.  Madhu is also a graduate of Rotary Leadership Institute’s training program.
 

 
Rotary Masks
Grant bought "rotary masks" from Fraserview club.   Masks were sold for $20 as fundraiser.   To support local business, they bought from a supplier at Granville Island.  However, it turns out that they are actually made in China.  
 
Project Committee
Dianna is looking for project committee members.  Please contact Dianna if you can help.  
 
Foundation
Annual fund goal for this year is $2,700.  Polio fund goal is $1,400.   Please donate generously.  
 
Speedy Recovery
Teddie had gall bladder surgery.   Surgery was a success.  It was reported that she was eating bacon & eggs the next day.  We wish her a speedy recovery.  
 
August 7th Zoom meeting
You should have received the link via email from rcvancouverarbutus@outlook.com on Aug 4th.  Link is also at our club's web page at https://portal.clubrunner.ca/778.
 
 
 
August 14th in person meeting
You should have received the address via email from rcvancouverarbutus@outlook.com on Aug 4th.  Walk along the hedge on right (west) side of house.  Go through gate and keep walking to back yard.  Garage door to car port will be open so people can also access the back yard from lane between 14th & 15th.  
 
Bring
   - your mask
   - your own food
   - your own drinks
   - your own chair, if you can.  There will be some chairs but not enough for everyone.  
 
 
Arbutus Club is no longer an option for future in person meeting venue for the Rotary Club of Vancouver Arbutus.  Club officers are exploring possible new meeting locations.   
 
Season’s in Park, at Queen Elizabeth Park
Grant joined Rotary Club of Vancouver Fraserview meeting.  RCVF meet in person every other week at Season’s in Park.  They do not Zoom.  Attendees prepay $29.50 per person online. Lunch menu had variety of 6-7 item to choose from.  Room was nice with 5 round tables, with 6 chairs per table.  Quality of food and service was good. Drinks are extra payable to restaurant.  Parking is $7 for 2 hours.  
 
Legion, at Broadway & Alma 
Not open till 3pm.  

St. James Community Square, at 10th & Trutch
Reasonable room rental rate.  Easily accessible by bus.  
 
If you know of other potential venues for the club, please contact President Grant.  
The Coronavirus DID NOT STOP the following Vancouver ROTARY Clubs  and Retractors from Helping Kids!
  • Rotary Club of Vancouver
  • Rotary Club of Vancouver Arbutus 
  • Rotary Club of Vancouver Fraserview
  • Rotary Club of Vancouver Sunrise
  • Rotary Club of Vancouver Yaletown
  • Vancouver Young Professionals Rotaract Club
 
Since 2007 the ROTARY Hoop-A-Thon Project has raised over $415,000 supporting Youth Leadership initiatives in Vancouver.  
 
Thanks to Rotarians, friends, family, Corporate Donors, The HoopLaw Tournament (www.hooplaw.net) and the Vancouver Basketball Foundation (https://www.vancouverbasketball.org) we were able to exceed last year’s receipts!  Hoop-A-Thon 2020 raised over $52,000.  Money raised helped kids as:
  • Scholarships: $35,000
  • Strathcona Basketball Program: $8,190
  • Rotary Youth Leadership Training (RYLA): $4,000
  • Girls who LEAP: (Lead, Empower, Act with Purpose): $5,000
 
Club Executives & Directors
President
Co-President Elect
Co-President Elect
Immediate Past President
Treasurer
Service Projects
Foundation Director
Membership
Public Relations

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