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Welcome to our Club!

Vancouver Arbutus

Service Above Self

We meet Fridays at 12:14 PM
Amica Arbutus Manor
2125 Eddington Drive
Vancouver, BC  V6L 3A9
Canada
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In early May, local news highlighted how the rising prise of gasoline was hurting the volunteers with the Freemasons’ Cancer Car Program (FCCP) drivers.  FCCP works in partnership with the Canadian Cancer Society to provide free transportation to and from cancer treatments.  Hans Doges – a member of the Rotary Club of Vancouver Arbutus - is one of the over 500 volunteer drivers for FCCP.

 

 

In 2018, FCCP provided 37,000 return trips - driving 700,000 km and spending $160,000 on gasoline - for cancer patients.   Of the 17 vehicles in their fleet, 5 vans are in Vancouver Island, 4 vans are in the interior, 1 all wheel vehicle is in Prince George, and 7 cars are in Vancouver.  Half of the Vancouver fleet recently transitioned to hybrid vehicles, saving on fuel costs. 

 

To assist with the high cost of gasoline, Rotary Club of Vancouver Arbutus has donated to the Freemasons’ Cancer Car Program. 

 

To learn more about the wonderful work done by FCCP, please go to https://fccp-bcy.weebly.com  

 

Nine very deserving high school graduates were given bursaries to assist with their post secondary education.   The 2019 bursary winners and the schools they are graduating from are:

Kaitlyn Wolfe – Fraser Academy

Katherine Matlashewski – adult education center

Eva Maglajlija – Prince of Wales Secondary

Ashley Buraga – Prince of Wales Secondary

Clive Rabara – Killarney Secondary

Alex Fenton – John Oliver Secondary

Emily Chu – John Oliver Secondary

Gavin Sian – John Oliver Secondary

Shivek Bhanote – John Oliver Secondary

 

BC Tour:  June 22 – July 10
Each year we plan a BC tour for inbound exchange students they travel by van and take part in several outdoor activities, camping and being home posted along the way. They depart from Vancouver and end their tour in Prince Rupert at the grizzly bear adventure. The tour is chaperoned by Rotarians who drive the vans and oversee the activities. All costs for these volunteers are covered including their meals and any admission or activity costs.
 
Unfortunately, two of our volunteers within the past week or so have had to step back, one due to health reasons and the other due to a new job opportunity so we’re looking for at least one volunteer. The tour begins June 22 starting in Vancouver and runs through until July 8, at which point the southern contingent leaves to return to Vancouver arriving July 10th.
 
This is a great opportunity to see the many communities along the way, enjoy some great activities and get to know a wonderful group of international youth.
 
The co-ordinator of the tour is Bob Killbery, if you are interested in more complete information, he can be contacted at bbkillbery@citywest.ca or by phone at 250-624-8565.
 
If you are interested in the opportunity but hesitant about the time commitment, Bob has indicated to me that it could be split into two parts; one could be from Vancouver to Prince George and the second from Prince George to Prince Rupert. A driver could do the Vancouver to PG piece than fly home and have another driver do the PG to PR route. The options can be discussed with Bob.
 
Tweedsmuir Trek: August 16 - 21
A second opportunity takes place in mid-August, the Tweedsmuir Trek is organized by the Rotary Club of Burns Lake and provides a great introduction to BC’s natural beauty. It is the first opportunity that the incoming students get together.  The Tweedsmuir Trek Involves travelling by boat from Burns Lake to the park where they take part in a variety of outdoor activities including swimming, hiking, fishing and basically just having a great time.
 
This is not a Youth Exchange activity, but it is one that we value as a wonderful way to welcome our students to our District and the enjoyment of our outdoors. More information regarding the Trek can be found on the Burns Lake website at https://rotaryburnslake.org/trek/tweedsmuir-trek-details/.
 
There are usually about 4 or 5 students from the lower mainland who would like to attend but need to be transported from Vancouver to Burns Lake. In past years, we have had individuals volunteer to do this and in return have joined in on the Trek no cost. We cover the fuel costs for the drive.
 
The participants need to arrive in Burns on August 16 in the program runs until the 21st.
 
The program Chair is Darrell Hill and if you would like more information about the activities, please contact him at dhill002@gmail.com.
 
If you are interested in either opportunity, please contact the leads as listed above or you can contact gina.rawson@shaw.ca or by phone/text at 50-552-3200. 

Rotary District 5040 is partnering with Third World Eye Care Society to collect 2,020 pairs of eyeglasses and sunglasses in time for the 2020 Vision Conference, April 24-26, 2020 in Vancouver.  Please help us reach this goal to help those who need better sight for a better life. 

• Each Rotary club will receive four boxes: one for club meetings and three for local optometry clinics or local retirement homes. 

• Single vision reading or distance eyeglasses are preferred. 

• Non-prescription sunglasses are also welcome. 

• No scratches and the frames in working order. 

• No loose lenses or frames only, must be a complete set.

• Bring your full boxes to the 2020 Vision Conference in Vancouver on April 24-26, 2020. 

 

Visit https://rotary5040.org/page/2020-district-conference for full details 

 

Guest Speaker: Kristi Coldwell
 
Originally founded as the BC Transplant Research Foundation, the TRF was established in 1992 with support provided by the BC Transplant Society (BCT). They are the only charitable foundation in Canada dedicated solely to funding peer-reviewed transplantation research; supporting innovation to benefit the lives of organ recipients.
 
Each year the TRF provides funding to BC scientists through the Venture Grant Program and a National Research Partnerships. They are helping researchers who are exploring new areas of science and medicine that will ultimately improve the lives of pre and post transplant patients.
 
This help benefits British Columbians whose lives are threatened by organ failure.
 
Their long range vision is fornewly developed treatment strategies, technologies and therapies to be developed to eliminate the need for organ transplantation.
 
Kristi Coldwell told us an emotional story of her personal journey as a transplant recipient and why she is so passionate about transplant research.  
 
Her journey began when she was born with a congenital heart defect. Unfortunately, she went undiagnosed till age 7 because the small town she lived in had no capability to diagnose her condition.  At age 9 she had her first open heart surgery, followed by the insertion of a pacemaker.  By age 15, she experienced significant heart failure.  At this time in the late 80’s, her medical team introduced the idea of a possible transplant, a very last stage resort for patients.   As there were lots of unknowns and the success rate was moderate, they decided on another heart surgery.  Unfortunately, the surgery was not successful and Kristi came close to dying from massive bleeding.  Eight months later she went through yet another heart surgery.   By age 17, her doctor said there was nothing left and a transplant was the only option if she was to live.  She and her parents were advised to think about it, as a transplant is not a cure, it is another set of disease.  Although Kristi’s mother opted for palliative care to minimize further suffering and to allow Kristi to enjoy the little time left to her, Kristi decided to fight for any possibility and proceeded with the transplant option.  
 
Kristi and her mother moved to Toronto, as there was no pediatric heart transplant programme in BC in 2000.  As they waited at Sick Kids Hospital she could feel herself dying bit by bit every day.   She was wheel chair bound, on oxygen full time, and in bed most of the time.  She was advised that there was strong likelihood she would suffer fatal arrythmia and that when this happened her heart was too weak for them to bring her back.  She went to sleep every night knowing that she might not wake up.  
 
Kristi considers herself one of the lucky ones.  After three and a half months of waiting, they got a call that there was a heart for her.  Although she immediately thought of the donor and the donor’s family – who, at the worst moment of their lives thought of helping somebody else - she knew she needed to focus all energy on what was to come; surviving the post transplant phase.   
 
Only three days after surgery, she had a cardiac arrest.  Kristi’s medical team did not know if she sustained any brain damage and to what extent her new heart might have been damaged.  At the time, there was limited knowledge and tools to determine the amount of cellular damage to organs during the donation and retrieval process.   She could only play a wait and see game with her future at stake.  
 
Over several years, Kristi experienced acute rejections.  Her system attacked the new heart, seeing it as a foreign body.  She also suffered numerous bouts of infection.  This led to many painful, invasive procedures with copious amounts of medication (which she talks about later).  
 
On the plus side, for the first time in her life Kristi experienced the amazing feeling of a normal heart beat.  All her life, she had suffered arrythmia.  When she told her transplant team that something was wrong, that she could not feel her heart, it was strange to be told that it was normal not to feel the heart. 
 
Kristi feels incredibly lucky to have lived a “normal” life over the last two decades. And is always grateful for things she thought she would never experience: 
  • To be able to go to sleep every night in her own bed instead of hospital beds.   
  • To go to bed without fear of not waking up in the morning.   
  • To be able to graduate from high school and to go onto university. 
  • To get married.  
 
As mentioned earlier, a transplant is not a cure.  It is a disease in and of itself.  Many people are unable to sustain the rigours of post transplant life.  Every day, Kristi takes numerous anti-rejection medications - currently only sixteen, down from forty-two.  These medications are potent and are very hard on the kidneys and liver, causing many transplant patients to later require kidney and/or liver transplants.  They are also carcinogenic, which results in very high incidence of cancer in the transplant population.  There is also ongoing fear of graft loss.  Such organ failure is a very real possibility. The number one reason heart recipients require another heart transplant is chronic rejection.  Kristi was told by her medical team that she will require another transplant one day.  Transplant research has come a long way, but there is still long way to go.  Because of transplant research Kristi is still alive.  
 
Transplant is becoming the treatment of choice for a variety of end stage diseases such as:
  • Diabetes
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Cancer
  • Congenital heart disease
 
But research is needed to make transplants a full cure for these end stages diseases, and not just the trade off it is now.
 
For additional information about transplant research visit http://www.trfbc.org.  
 
Our speaker on June 7th was Vincent Yang Ph.D, who was charged (or charged himself) with the task of unravelling for proletarians like ourselves the tangled skein that has been woven around the recent Meng Wanzhou detention in Vancouver under the Extradition Treaty with the US respecting the supposed infraction by this lady of the sanctions of the US upon Iran. The subject was outlined in some detail because of the arrest of the lady on December 1st and the immediate and unequivocal demand by China for her release on the basis of her human rights having been transgressed by her imprisonment and subsequent release on bail (with concomitant restrictions and travel and domicile limitations), a proposition almost risible in light of the coincident arraignment  and detention of the two Canadian Michaels in China because of other poorly defined offences against Chineses law (which is itself opaque at the best of times). In fact, the Vancouver processes were by no means lethargic: on December 10th the bail hearing proceeded, but only one day later the Chinese Ministry declared that “China will not sit idly by” (whatever that meant) whereon Ambassador to China John McCallum declared that Meng may well have a very good defence to the extradition request … … at which point he was promptly fired from his post! Very soon after this strange Canadian response it was announced in Beijing that no calls would be accepted from Canada, and then, on January 8th Ambassador Lu Shaye accused Canada of “white supremacy” (whatever that may be). The pace of events then slowed, informal sources declaring that the extradition process could well occupy another 2 years (a declaration that would surprise no Canadian lawyer).

Necessarily, the focus of events then began to move to trade and other issues, particularly difficult to disentangle because of the simultaneous debate (to put it kindly) going on between the White House and the Chinese government, who themselves have some difficulty in even understanding dissent, let alone knowing how to counter it!. The issues then arising became more complex with the “threat to Canada’s national security” that many Canadians perceived (a partial throwback to the curious nature of such threats now given some credibility by the orange-haired fellow in Washington). Suffice it to say that it now appears that 66% of Canadians declare that will avoid buying Chinese products and 56% say that the arrest of Meng is a legal matter and that Canada has done no wrong. One need hardly add that such opinions in Canada are hardly likely to disturb the equanimity felt in China by these events in a minnow of world diplomacy such as is Canada. Time will tell.

The gravamen of Dr. Yang’s presentation was in the final event limned by our august Leigh. He made the point, which had by that time become readily apparent, that the whole issue revolved around the question of the Rule of Law. Plainly the kernel of the issue was whether Huawei had transgressed the US sanctions (legitimately, if unwisely, applied by the US government against what is ostensibly an independent company outside governmental control) which because of the reality of the Chinese view of ‘business’ had now become a political and not a legal matter. Simply put, the whole matter, because of the Chinese view of economics and politics, was and always has been political: there is then no distinction to be made in China between the two concepts.

By coincidence this whole issue became alive simultaneously with the 30-year anniversary of the the Tienanmen massacre. This event, glazed over at the time, has in the intervening years become not so much a political hot-potato as a non-event. The Economist reports in its latest edition that an activist, Chen Bing, was sentenced to three and a half years in prison because he labelled bottles of alcohol with pictures of the lone protester who stared down tanks in the square. Even mothers of school pupils gunned down in cold blood are said to have been place under surveillance or gone on enforced “trips out of town.” And these steps are taken by a government who want the world to believe that they rule in a majoritarian compact accepted by most of their citizens!

Dr. Yang ended on what seems to your correspondent to be a solidly practical note. If Ms. Meng chose to simply drive down to the US and surrender herself to the authorities, she would likely be brought before a criminal court with celerity. Thereupon, she would be faced with the issue of simply raising a reasonable doubt before a jury that no criminal offence had occurred, not too high a hurdle to overcome with her resources, which are plainly able to buy th very finest legal talent (and, of course, purchase a bit of political influence as well, unspoken though this sentiment must remain). As it is, however, it looks as though we must be faced with this farrago at least until January 2021.
Rotary this week May 31, 2019
 
The return of Rob Danielson it was great to have Rob come and visit the Club.
 
The 2019 Polio Walk
This event took place on May 26th, at the River Market, New Westminster, we had a strong team of Yoohni, Lana, Joy, Grant, Betty and myself. It was a lovely walk along the boardwalk by the Fraser River.  The project raised $7,000. Our club donated $225.00 thank you to all who walked and donated.
 
Country Updates(as of May 15th, 2019).
since the April newsletter.
  • Afghanistan:
    - Four new cases of WPV1 has been confirmed. The total for 2019 is now 7.
  • Pakistan:
    - Nine new cases of WPV1 have been confirmed. The total for 2019 is now 15.
  • Nigeria:
    - No new cases of the wild polio virus have been detected since 21-Aug-2016.
Case breakdown by Country(as of May 15th, 2019).
 
Countries
  YTD 2019
  YTD 2018
 Total 2018
  WPV
cVDPV
  WPV
cVDPV
   WPV
cVDPV
Afghanistan
   7
    0
   8
   0
  21
     0
DR of the Congo
   0
    1
   0
   7
   0
    20
Nigeria
   0
    8
    0 
   1
    0  
    34
Pakistan
   15
    0
   3
   0
  12 
     0
Other non-endemic countries
   0
    1
   0
   3
    0  
   50
TOTAL
   22
    10
   11
   11
  33
  104
 
 
 
 Better sight for a better life
 
Rotary District 5040 is partnering with Third World Eye Care Society to collect 2,020 pairs of eyeglasses and sunglasses in time for the 2020 Vision Conference, April 24-26, 2020 in Vancouver.
Please help us reach this goal to help those who need
better sight for a better life.
 
• Each Rotary club will receive four boxes: one for club meetings and three for local optometry clinics or local retirement homes.
 
• Single vision reading or distance eyeglasses are preferred.
• Non-prescription sunglasses are also welcome.
 
• No scratches and the frames in working order.
 
• No loose lenses or frames only, must be a complete set.
 
• Bring your full boxes to the 2020 Vision Conference in Vancouver on April 24-26, 2020.
 
RYLA LAKELSE:
I am writing to ask whether the Vancouver Arbutus Rotary Club will be sponsoring students to attend this years RYLA Lakelse camp in Terrace.  We ask that you advise how many students as soon as possible.
Hoop-A- THON
We are set to have the cheques presented at our Breakfast Meeting, 7:30 am on Weds June 5/19 at The Coal Harbour Community Centre.
 
HOOP-A-THON Wrap Up:
2019 Fund Raising to date: Total: $42,670
Discussion: Areas of Improvement for 2020: 
Goal for 2020: Expand to other schools and include other areas; Need is important.  HOW do we do that?? Better engage our Members and Add Clubs.
T-shirts for 2020; use as an incentive for kids?
Next Year’s Hoop-A-Thon date is  Saturday, MAY 9/20….Mark your calendars!
 Thanks to all! With the support of 4 Rotary Clubs and Members we have set a new record for fundraising this year.  Since 2006 Rotary has raised over $355,000 for kids at risk in Vancouver.  We are making a difference!
 
"Cross Egypt Challenge" that aims to promote tourism to Egypt and prove that Egypt is still safe for tourism.  Rotary Club of Alexandria Cosmopolitan - District 2451 –

Cross Egypt Challenge is an international cross-country motorcycle and scooter adventure tour conducted throughout the majestic and fascinating Egypt. Participation is open for Rotarians and non-Rotarians a like and their accompanying spouses or friends from around the globe. People who do not ride motorcycles can also join this amazing adventure and be hosted in air-conditioned chase vans.

This amazing Rotary project started in 2011 and for the past 8 years, Rotarians and riders from over 45 countries took part in the adventurous challenge. This year the challenge will start on October 17 and will last for 10 days and will pass by Egypt's top attractions and off the beaten track destinations. 

A normal practice we are used to conduct during Cross Egypt Challenge is an annual "Sahara Rotary Meeting" where participating Rotarians along with Rotaracts from our organizing team conduct an official Rotary meeting in the Egyptian Desert –
 
 
Rotary Friendship Exchange to Russia:
Join the Rotary Friendship Exchange to Russia August 19 to September 2, 2019. A group of 10 to 12 people from our Rotary District 5040 will visit fellow members in Rotary District 2223. But hurry. Deadline to apply is June 15, 2019. Partners, family friends welcome. Visas are required.
 
2019 - 2020 District Leadership Team Installation

Saturday 22 June 2019 6 PM

Riverside Banquet Halls
14500 River Road
Richmond BC

Register Now!

Last date to purchase tickets 14 June 2019

$60 per Person
 
Don Evans Memorial Service
Don's love for trains is also evident with his involvement with the West Coast Railway Assoc and the creation of the West Coast Railway Heritage Park in Squamish.
This is where Don's memorial will take place.
 
JULY 7th, 2019
Westcoast Railway Heritage Park Roundhouse @ 2:00 PM.
 
Again, out thoughts and prayers are with Don's wife Deb, and his children and families at this time.
 
 
MARK YOUR CALENDAR:  June 29 Club BBQ at Leigh’s House.
 
Club Directors Meeting:
After our meeting on May 31
Alida Jurconi is back from Hawaii for the summer.  She treated us to chocolate covered macadamia nuts.  Yummm!   
 
Our own Bill Bourlet is also back for the summer.  
 
 
 
 
Imaging used to study anatomy and organ function are:  
  • Radiation useslight, heat, ultraviolet rays, microwaves, radio waves and electric current.
  • Ionizing radiationis used in x-ray and nuclear medicine – discharge of particles such as electron form an atom.
  • Radioisotopes or radionuclideare unstable form of a chemical element that releases radiation as it breaks down and becomes more stable.  Different isotopes bind to different tissues.
  • Tomographyis imaging by sections or slices.
  • Contrast mediumare substances ingested or injected to increase delineation of structures (ex. Barium, iodine, gadolinium). 
 
Examples of medical imaging using ionizing radiation are:
  • X-ray:  radiography is used for static 2D imaging of areas such as chest, skull, hand, etc.  Usually, at least two perpendicular views are taken for better evaluation.  
  • Fluoroscopylooks at the structure in movement or continuous motion to study gastro-intestinal tract (esophagus, stomach, bowel) and blood vessels (angiography), the spinal fluid (myelography). 
  • CT scan  combines the x-ray beam with powerful computer calculations.
  • Nuclear medicine uses short acting man-made radioisotopes of various elements to selectively accumulate in tissues, in order to study function or locate disease.  Some examples are bone scan with technetium-99 to look for spread of cancer to bone, or thyroid scan with iodine-131 to locate hyperfunctioning nodule.
  • PET scan uses very short acting isotope of glucose to locate very active cells, such as cancer cells.  CT scan or MRI are superimposed at the same time to locate deposits in space, as 3D image reconstructions.  
 
Examples of treatment using ionizing radiation (radiation therapy) are:
  • External radiation therapy, also called external beam radiation therapy uses high powered beams of energy to kill cancer cells. 
  • Internal radiation therapyputs radioactive substances into the body.  Needles or “seeds” can be inserted in tumour tissues.  Radioisotope such as iodine 131 can be swallowed to treat an overactive thyroid gland or thyroid cancer.  
 
Examples of medical imaging and/or treatment without inonizing radiation:
  • Ultrasounduses sound waves to distinguish solid from fluid.   It is used to guide biopsies, various tube insertions, locate brain or spinal cord abnormalities intra-operatively.  Obstetrical ultrasound is used to study fetal development.  Echocardiography is used to study heart.  Duplex ultrasound is used to check blood vessels in extremities and neck. Lithotripsy is used to turn kidney stones to sand.  
  • MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) uses radio waves and powerful magnets combined with computers to produce images of soft tissues, including bone marrow.   MRI of brain and spinal cord looks for signs of blood vessel damage, brain injury, cancer, stroke.  
 
Almost everyone can donate blood when it is used for research.  Five of us went in the van from Granville Gardens (thanks Donna) to UBC to donate blood.  It is more fund in a group and they had great snacks after!
 
Show your support for the cause by making a donation and/or showing up to the walk at River Market - 810 Quayside Drive, New Westminster, B.C.
 
8:00 am   volunteers to show up
9:00 am   registration opens
9:30 am   opening ceremony
10:00 am   walk begins  
 
Donate to team “Rotary Club of Vancouver Arbutus” 
 
Jenna Wadden & Maya Pasut thanked the Rotary Club of Vancouver Arbutus for sponsoring their RYLA adventure.  Not knowing anybody except each other, they were nervous and scared when they arrived at Camp Elphinstone.  They were immediately separated into team yellow and team blue. Through mingle game and team bonding activities, a group of strangers became good friends during the fun filled weekend.  
 
Attendees participated in professional development workshops with emphasis on 5 F’s: faith, freedom, family, future & fun.  They discovered their personality traits – artistic versus analytical.  Groups tackled community projects such as homelessness and vaping amongst youth.  In doing so, they gained self confidence and leadership skills through group effort, idea collaboration, and presentation skills.
 
Attendees learned about Rotary International, and that young people are also involved in Rotary.  They met and became friends with people from other cities and other countries.  They discovered that everybody is a leader.  
The Walk for Polio, held on New Westminster's famous riverside Quay is a joint venture between Burnaby and New Westminster Rotary Clubs.  this year Rotary Arbutus members will be walking with them on May 26th.  
 
The walk is to support child polio victims to get rehabilitation in two hospitals in Ethiopia.  Children will be treated by physios in Addis and Hawasa hospitals and their parents will be trained to provide after care when the children return home.  Polio eradication is a big area of service for Rotarians around the world.  What is often misunderstood in the western world is that children do contract the disease and that their care in the many years following, must also be a focus of the effort.
 
The project is underway and entering its second year in what is already a very successful operation.  
 
Our members are very happy to be part of this important work.  We are also looking forward to a walk - on a sunny May day -- for a very good cause.
7 years ago, Ilan pledged to donate $100 per month to Rotary for 10 years.   He is now in his 8th year of monthly giving.  

The Paul Harris Fellow program recognizes individuals who contribute, or who have contributions made in their name, of $1,000 to The Rotary Foundation of Rotary International.

The honor was established in 1957 to show appreciation for contributions that support Rotary’s Annual Fund, PolioPlus, or an approved Foundation grant.
 
Sustainability is something everyone can work towards.  Whether it is picking up garbage you see on the street or boycotting a company that practices environmentally harmful business mothods, we all can make a difference. 
 
5 things you can do starting today
  • Buy local/seasonal and buy food from which you can spell the ingredients
  • Refuse plastic at the store and bring your own bag or coffee mug
  • Recycle, reuse, repair
  • Eat less meat and if you do, buy organic at the butcher
  • If you can choose, use glass over plastic packaging or even no packaging
 
Seasonal calendar for BC (click to download) 
 
 
Gerry Dearing spoke to us about the work of the Sunshine Foundation Canada, an organisation that makes dreams come true for children aged 7 – 18 who have disabilities or life threatening illnesses. They have been operating for 50 years and serve kids from across Canada.
 
Their aim is not just to bring joy but also to help the children build resilience and confidence.  Children dream up their own experiences and then the Foundation provides a team who can provide specialised equipment, medical expertise and about 6 months of planning to make it happen.
 
All dreams are examined by a medical advisor team to make sure it is possible and safe for the child to undertake the dream.
 
Some dreams are modest – like to child who wanted an accessible swing in his school playground, others require months of preparation to help a child get ready for their dream day.  The preparation is a big part of the program and gives the child a sense of agency and independence.  It also represents a chance to plan for something that is not part of their on-going challenges with medical conditions.  Individual dream experiences involve the whole family.
 
There is also a group component to the Sunshine Foundation’s work. Periodically, they do a DREAM LIFT for a whole plane-full of 80 children who spend one day going to Disneyland. Children from the eastern parts of Canada go to Disneyland Florida and those from Western Canada go to Disneyland California.  The trip is undertaken in one very long day and the children travel independently from their families.  Teams of volunteers accompany the children, and a “Team Orange” – named for the fact that Disneyland is in Orange County in both locations – meets them at the airport to take care of their needs while they are visiting Disneyland.  
 
It is a remarkable effort and a magical day for all concerned as the children make new friends and have experiences that can truly be called a chance in a life-time.
 
The Foundation, though it only has 12 staff, is planning to expend its operation in BC.  They currently alternate the Dream Lift between East and West coasts and only do one trip every 4 years coming from the West.  
 
As Gerry said, their efforts are all about the kids hearing and experiencing “yes” in their lives.  
 
 
Come and donate blood with us!  Wednesday, May 15th, 1 pm at the Blood for Research Facility at UBC.  It will take about 2 hours and doesn't cost you anything!  They will even pay for parking or transit.
To join our group please contact Mary Stark m_stark@telus.net 604-328-8985.
 
The speaker, Jean Paul Gravel, provided us with a disquisition on the general topic of relationships, beliefs, happiness and how to manage life generally. He had been born into an unsettled existence of violence, threats and uncertainty, from which beginnings he had developed the view that everybody is a fake, a principle of uncertainty that drove him into an exploration of the three tenets of life: each of us is embroiled in the obligation to think, feel and act … whether you like it or not. His conceit was a story of the inexperienced youth who, charged with the task of clearing a copse, spent so much time sharpening his axe that his inquisitors despaired of his ever being able to discharge his task. However, he eventually so refined the sharpness of the instrument that when he got to work, almost too late, his tool was so sharp that everything fell before him with plenty of time to spare. Such is life: one has to have prepared the requisites that life can be managed on one’s own terms. The adze must be properly honed before commencing to use it.
 
The exercise that followed was more demonstrative. Asked to stand up and face one’s neighbour about a foot apart, your learned correspondent found himself confronted by the redoubtable Mary. Required to look into one’s companion’s eyes for 30 seconds, I found myself looking into a mind in constant motion and obviously deeply attentive to some profound metaphysical concept. The profound silence that accompanied this undertaking evidently encompassed everybody, as the silence of deep thought was manifestly profound. (When I asked my profound partner whether she had seen something similarly enervating in my aura, she indicated that all that she saw was a tabula rasa; I did not know whether to be happy or sad with this revelation.) However, this reactive feeling apparently did not much matter: that component of the presentation ceased at the point of regaining our seats. 
 
We then moved onto ‘beliefs', these being demonstrated by the drawing of a little man in a boat approaching the edge of a saucer (apparently the rower believed that he was about to sail over the edge of the world, this represented by the saucer) and the segue into the fact that life is only an illusion and that we humans spend our lives pretending to be a confident reflection of who we actually are … or indeed, actually aren’t! Further, each of us has on average about 75,000 separate thoughts a day, none of which we remember (how then can we know how many we have? This, Jean Paul left unexplained). What we are seeking is the extension of our lives and perceptions into Emotional Freedom, of which there are 3 levels, which eventually will lead to happiness (for all, or individually: who would know unless we have sharpened our minds by limiting our beliefs?) And there we are, back to the beliefs with which the enigmatic question of fakery began 27 minutes before. 
 
A very thought-provoking intellectual journey was had by all.
 
 
This week Past District Governor Leigh Higinbotham had the pleasure of inducting our newest member - Donna Patterson.  Donna is a marketing manager at Verves Senior Living and will share her talents in marketing and fundraising with us.  Welcome to Rotary Donna!
On April 5th we had Janet McManus, the manager from the netCAD Blood for Research Facility speak to us about their very important work.  It is part of Canadian Blood Services and drives world-class innovation in blood products for  transfusion, cellular therapy, and transplants.  It is also an independent non-profit agency linked to a world-wide network of  blood product agencies.  However, it is also one-of a kind in the world, doing this work on a national Canadian-wide level and making our blood services one of the best internationally. They supply blood products for researchers all across Canada for virus research and many other health and blood-related issues. They also test the equipment  used for collection, transfusion and storage of blood products.
 She explained how the blood they collect is separated into its 3 or more  component parts – all of which have a different “shelf-life” for use in hospitals and  trauma centres.  For instance, trauma doctors in the military require very  particular and special services in this regard.   Janet also told us how donors who have been told they are not eligible to donate blood can donate, at the research site, for research purposes.  Their blood is also used to help improve processes at our Canadian Blood Services Agency.For those wanting to donate to this unique agency, Janet explained that they have donor days on Mondays and Wednesdays and can take 45 donors in one day, no waiting!  Parking is paid for and sometimes they provide pizza!                   
Janet also told us how donors who have been told they are not eligible to donate   blood can donate, at the research site, for research purposes.  Their blood is also used to help improve processes at our Canadian Blood Services Agency.     
      Several Rotarians and visitors attended the meeting specifically to learn more about this unique opportunity because due to extensive travel, place of birth or  other health factors they have not been able to donate and would very much like to do so.   Our own member, Mary Stark, sprang into action and got all the details so that  club members could join a group donation day when we can donate together.  For those more inclined to act independently, you can find out if you may be eligible to donate at netCAD, you can also contact them directly:
Email: researchdonations@blood.ca Phone: 604-221-5515           Address: University Marketplace (at UBC) 207-2150 Western Parkway
 
 
Home Page Stories

In early May, local news highlighted how the rising prise of gasoline was hurting the volunteers with the Freemasons’ Cancer Car Program (FCCP) drivers.  FCCP works in partnership with the Canadian Cancer Society to provide free transportation to and from cancer treatments.  Hans Doges – a member of the Rotary Club of Vancouver Arbutus - is one of the over 500 volunteer drivers for FCCP.

 

 

In 2018, FCCP provided 37,000 return trips - driving 700,000 km and spending $160,000 on gasoline - for cancer patients.   Of the 17 vehicles in their fleet, 5 vans are in Vancouver Island, 4 vans are in the interior, 1 all wheel vehicle is in Prince George, and 7 cars are in Vancouver.  Half of the Vancouver fleet recently transitioned to hybrid vehicles, saving on fuel costs. 

 

To assist with the high cost of gasoline, Rotary Club of Vancouver Arbutus has donated to the Freemasons’ Cancer Car Program. 

 

To learn more about the wonderful work done by FCCP, please go to https://fccp-bcy.weebly.com  

 

Nine very deserving high school graduates were given bursaries to assist with their post secondary education.   The 2019 bursary winners and the schools they are graduating from are:

Kaitlyn Wolfe – Fraser Academy

Katherine Matlashewski – adult education center

Eva Maglajlija – Prince of Wales Secondary

Ashley Buraga – Prince of Wales Secondary

Clive Rabara – Killarney Secondary

Alex Fenton – John Oliver Secondary

Emily Chu – John Oliver Secondary

Gavin Sian – John Oliver Secondary

Shivek Bhanote – John Oliver Secondary

 

BC Tour:  June 22 – July 10
Each year we plan a BC tour for inbound exchange students they travel by van and take part in several outdoor activities, camping and being home posted along the way. They depart from Vancouver and end their tour in Prince Rupert at the grizzly bear adventure. The tour is chaperoned by Rotarians who drive the vans and oversee the activities. All costs for these volunteers are covered including their meals and any admission or activity costs.
 
Unfortunately, two of our volunteers within the past week or so have had to step back, one due to health reasons and the other due to a new job opportunity so we’re looking for at least one volunteer. The tour begins June 22 starting in Vancouver and runs through until July 8, at which point the southern contingent leaves to return to Vancouver arriving July 10th.
 
This is a great opportunity to see the many communities along the way, enjoy some great activities and get to know a wonderful group of international youth.
 
The co-ordinator of the tour is Bob Killbery, if you are interested in more complete information, he can be contacted at bbkillbery@citywest.ca or by phone at 250-624-8565.
 
If you are interested in the opportunity but hesitant about the time commitment, Bob has indicated to me that it could be split into two parts; one could be from Vancouver to Prince George and the second from Prince George to Prince Rupert. A driver could do the Vancouver to PG piece than fly home and have another driver do the PG to PR route. The options can be discussed with Bob.
 
Tweedsmuir Trek: August 16 - 21
A second opportunity takes place in mid-August, the Tweedsmuir Trek is organized by the Rotary Club of Burns Lake and provides a great introduction to BC’s natural beauty. It is the first opportunity that the incoming students get together.  The Tweedsmuir Trek Involves travelling by boat from Burns Lake to the park where they take part in a variety of outdoor activities including swimming, hiking, fishing and basically just having a great time.
 
This is not a Youth Exchange activity, but it is one that we value as a wonderful way to welcome our students to our District and the enjoyment of our outdoors. More information regarding the Trek can be found on the Burns Lake website at https://rotaryburnslake.org/trek/tweedsmuir-trek-details/.
 
There are usually about 4 or 5 students from the lower mainland who would like to attend but need to be transported from Vancouver to Burns Lake. In past years, we have had individuals volunteer to do this and in return have joined in on the Trek no cost. We cover the fuel costs for the drive.
 
The participants need to arrive in Burns on August 16 in the program runs until the 21st.
 
The program Chair is Darrell Hill and if you would like more information about the activities, please contact him at dhill002@gmail.com.
 
If you are interested in either opportunity, please contact the leads as listed above or you can contact gina.rawson@shaw.ca or by phone/text at 50-552-3200. 

Rotary District 5040 is partnering with Third World Eye Care Society to collect 2,020 pairs of eyeglasses and sunglasses in time for the 2020 Vision Conference, April 24-26, 2020 in Vancouver.  Please help us reach this goal to help those who need better sight for a better life. 

• Each Rotary club will receive four boxes: one for club meetings and three for local optometry clinics or local retirement homes. 

• Single vision reading or distance eyeglasses are preferred. 

• Non-prescription sunglasses are also welcome. 

• No scratches and the frames in working order. 

• No loose lenses or frames only, must be a complete set.

• Bring your full boxes to the 2020 Vision Conference in Vancouver on April 24-26, 2020. 

 

Visit https://rotary5040.org/page/2020-district-conference for full details 

 

Guest Speaker: Kristi Coldwell
 
Originally founded as the BC Transplant Research Foundation, the TRF was established in 1992 with support provided by the BC Transplant Society (BCT). They are the only charitable foundation in Canada dedicated solely to funding peer-reviewed transplantation research; supporting innovation to benefit the lives of organ recipients.
 
Each year the TRF provides funding to BC scientists through the Venture Grant Program and a National Research Partnerships. They are helping researchers who are exploring new areas of science and medicine that will ultimately improve the lives of pre and post transplant patients.
 
This help benefits British Columbians whose lives are threatened by organ failure.
 
Their long range vision is fornewly developed treatment strategies, technologies and therapies to be developed to eliminate the need for organ transplantation.
 
Kristi Coldwell told us an emotional story of her personal journey as a transplant recipient and why she is so passionate about transplant research.  
 
Her journey began when she was born with a congenital heart defect. Unfortunately, she went undiagnosed till age 7 because the small town she lived in had no capability to diagnose her condition.  At age 9 she had her first open heart surgery, followed by the insertion of a pacemaker.  By age 15, she experienced significant heart failure.  At this time in the late 80’s, her medical team introduced the idea of a possible transplant, a very last stage resort for patients.   As there were lots of unknowns and the success rate was moderate, they decided on another heart surgery.  Unfortunately, the surgery was not successful and Kristi came close to dying from massive bleeding.  Eight months later she went through yet another heart surgery.   By age 17, her doctor said there was nothing left and a transplant was the only option if she was to live.  She and her parents were advised to think about it, as a transplant is not a cure, it is another set of disease.  Although Kristi’s mother opted for palliative care to minimize further suffering and to allow Kristi to enjoy the little time left to her, Kristi decided to fight for any possibility and proceeded with the transplant option.  
 
Kristi and her mother moved to Toronto, as there was no pediatric heart transplant programme in BC in 2000.  As they waited at Sick Kids Hospital she could feel herself dying bit by bit every day.   She was wheel chair bound, on oxygen full time, and in bed most of the time.  She was advised that there was strong likelihood she would suffer fatal arrythmia and that when this happened her heart was too weak for them to bring her back.  She went to sleep every night knowing that she might not wake up.  
 
Kristi considers herself one of the lucky ones.  After three and a half months of waiting, they got a call that there was a heart for her.  Although she immediately thought of the donor and the donor’s family – who, at the worst moment of their lives thought of helping somebody else - she knew she needed to focus all energy on what was to come; surviving the post transplant phase.   
 
Only three days after surgery, she had a cardiac arrest.  Kristi’s medical team did not know if she sustained any brain damage and to what extent her new heart might have been damaged.  At the time, there was limited knowledge and tools to determine the amount of cellular damage to organs during the donation and retrieval process.   She could only play a wait and see game with her future at stake.  
 
Over several years, Kristi experienced acute rejections.  Her system attacked the new heart, seeing it as a foreign body.  She also suffered numerous bouts of infection.  This led to many painful, invasive procedures with copious amounts of medication (which she talks about later).  
 
On the plus side, for the first time in her life Kristi experienced the amazing feeling of a normal heart beat.  All her life, she had suffered arrythmia.  When she told her transplant team that something was wrong, that she could not feel her heart, it was strange to be told that it was normal not to feel the heart. 
 
Kristi feels incredibly lucky to have lived a “normal” life over the last two decades. And is always grateful for things she thought she would never experience: 
  • To be able to go to sleep every night in her own bed instead of hospital beds.   
  • To go to bed without fear of not waking up in the morning.   
  • To be able to graduate from high school and to go onto university. 
  • To get married.  
 
As mentioned earlier, a transplant is not a cure.  It is a disease in and of itself.  Many people are unable to sustain the rigours of post transplant life.  Every day, Kristi takes numerous anti-rejection medications - currently only sixteen, down from forty-two.  These medications are potent and are very hard on the kidneys and liver, causing many transplant patients to later require kidney and/or liver transplants.  They are also carcinogenic, which results in very high incidence of cancer in the transplant population.  There is also ongoing fear of graft loss.  Such organ failure is a very real possibility. The number one reason heart recipients require another heart transplant is chronic rejection.  Kristi was told by her medical team that she will require another transplant one day.  Transplant research has come a long way, but there is still long way to go.  Because of transplant research Kristi is still alive.  
 
Transplant is becoming the treatment of choice for a variety of end stage diseases such as:
  • Diabetes
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Cancer
  • Congenital heart disease
 
But research is needed to make transplants a full cure for these end stages diseases, and not just the trade off it is now.
 
For additional information about transplant research visit http://www.trfbc.org.  
 
Our speaker on June 7th was Vincent Yang Ph.D, who was charged (or charged himself) with the task of unravelling for proletarians like ourselves the tangled skein that has been woven around the recent Meng Wanzhou detention in Vancouver under the Extradition Treaty with the US respecting the supposed infraction by this lady of the sanctions of the US upon Iran. The subject was outlined in some detail because of the arrest of the lady on December 1st and the immediate and unequivocal demand by China for her release on the basis of her human rights having been transgressed by her imprisonment and subsequent release on bail (with concomitant restrictions and travel and domicile limitations), a proposition almost risible in light of the coincident arraignment  and detention of the two Canadian Michaels in China because of other poorly defined offences against Chineses law (which is itself opaque at the best of times). In fact, the Vancouver processes were by no means lethargic: on December 10th the bail hearing proceeded, but only one day later the Chinese Ministry declared that “China will not sit idly by” (whatever that meant) whereon Ambassador to China John McCallum declared that Meng may well have a very good defence to the extradition request … … at which point he was promptly fired from his post! Very soon after this strange Canadian response it was announced in Beijing that no calls would be accepted from Canada, and then, on January 8th Ambassador Lu Shaye accused Canada of “white supremacy” (whatever that may be). The pace of events then slowed, informal sources declaring that the extradition process could well occupy another 2 years (a declaration that would surprise no Canadian lawyer).

Necessarily, the focus of events then began to move to trade and other issues, particularly difficult to disentangle because of the simultaneous debate (to put it kindly) going on between the White House and the Chinese government, who themselves have some difficulty in even understanding dissent, let alone knowing how to counter it!. The issues then arising became more complex with the “threat to Canada’s national security” that many Canadians perceived (a partial throwback to the curious nature of such threats now given some credibility by the orange-haired fellow in Washington). Suffice it to say that it now appears that 66% of Canadians declare that will avoid buying Chinese products and 56% say that the arrest of Meng is a legal matter and that Canada has done no wrong. One need hardly add that such opinions in Canada are hardly likely to disturb the equanimity felt in China by these events in a minnow of world diplomacy such as is Canada. Time will tell.

The gravamen of Dr. Yang’s presentation was in the final event limned by our august Leigh. He made the point, which had by that time become readily apparent, that the whole issue revolved around the question of the Rule of Law. Plainly the kernel of the issue was whether Huawei had transgressed the US sanctions (legitimately, if unwisely, applied by the US government against what is ostensibly an independent company outside governmental control) which because of the reality of the Chinese view of ‘business’ had now become a political and not a legal matter. Simply put, the whole matter, because of the Chinese view of economics and politics, was and always has been political: there is then no distinction to be made in China between the two concepts.

By coincidence this whole issue became alive simultaneously with the 30-year anniversary of the the Tienanmen massacre. This event, glazed over at the time, has in the intervening years become not so much a political hot-potato as a non-event. The Economist reports in its latest edition that an activist, Chen Bing, was sentenced to three and a half years in prison because he labelled bottles of alcohol with pictures of the lone protester who stared down tanks in the square. Even mothers of school pupils gunned down in cold blood are said to have been place under surveillance or gone on enforced “trips out of town.” And these steps are taken by a government who want the world to believe that they rule in a majoritarian compact accepted by most of their citizens!

Dr. Yang ended on what seems to your correspondent to be a solidly practical note. If Ms. Meng chose to simply drive down to the US and surrender herself to the authorities, she would likely be brought before a criminal court with celerity. Thereupon, she would be faced with the issue of simply raising a reasonable doubt before a jury that no criminal offence had occurred, not too high a hurdle to overcome with her resources, which are plainly able to buy th very finest legal talent (and, of course, purchase a bit of political influence as well, unspoken though this sentiment must remain). As it is, however, it looks as though we must be faced with this farrago at least until January 2021.
Rotary this week May 31, 2019
 
The return of Rob Danielson it was great to have Rob come and visit the Club.
 
The 2019 Polio Walk
This event took place on May 26th, at the River Market, New Westminster, we had a strong team of Yoohni, Lana, Joy, Grant, Betty and myself. It was a lovely walk along the boardwalk by the Fraser River.  The project raised $7,000. Our club donated $225.00 thank you to all who walked and donated.
 
Country Updates(as of May 15th, 2019).
since the April newsletter.
  • Afghanistan:
    - Four new cases of WPV1 has been confirmed. The total for 2019 is now 7.
  • Pakistan:
    - Nine new cases of WPV1 have been confirmed. The total for 2019 is now 15.
  • Nigeria:
    - No new cases of the wild polio virus have been detected since 21-Aug-2016.
Case breakdown by Country(as of May 15th, 2019).
 
Countries
  YTD 2019
  YTD 2018
 Total 2018
  WPV
cVDPV
  WPV
cVDPV
   WPV
cVDPV
Afghanistan
   7
    0
   8
   0
  21
     0
DR of the Congo
   0
    1
   0
   7
   0
    20
Nigeria
   0
    8
    0 
   1
    0  
    34
Pakistan
   15
    0
   3
   0
  12 
     0
Other non-endemic countries
   0
    1
   0
   3
    0  
   50
TOTAL
   22
    10
   11
   11
  33
  104
 
 
 
 Better sight for a better life
 
Rotary District 5040 is partnering with Third World Eye Care Society to collect 2,020 pairs of eyeglasses and sunglasses in time for the 2020 Vision Conference, April 24-26, 2020 in Vancouver.
Please help us reach this goal to help those who need
better sight for a better life.
 
• Each Rotary club will receive four boxes: one for club meetings and three for local optometry clinics or local retirement homes.
 
• Single vision reading or distance eyeglasses are preferred.
• Non-prescription sunglasses are also welcome.
 
• No scratches and the frames in working order.
 
• No loose lenses or frames only, must be a complete set.
 
• Bring your full boxes to the 2020 Vision Conference in Vancouver on April 24-26, 2020.
 
RYLA LAKELSE:
I am writing to ask whether the Vancouver Arbutus Rotary Club will be sponsoring students to attend this years RYLA Lakelse camp in Terrace.  We ask that you advise how many students as soon as possible.
Hoop-A- THON
We are set to have the cheques presented at our Breakfast Meeting, 7:30 am on Weds June 5/19 at The Coal Harbour Community Centre.
 
HOOP-A-THON Wrap Up:
2019 Fund Raising to date: Total: $42,670
Discussion: Areas of Improvement for 2020: 
Goal for 2020: Expand to other schools and include other areas; Need is important.  HOW do we do that?? Better engage our Members and Add Clubs.
T-shirts for 2020; use as an incentive for kids?
Next Year’s Hoop-A-Thon date is  Saturday, MAY 9/20….Mark your calendars!
 Thanks to all! With the support of 4 Rotary Clubs and Members we have set a new record for fundraising this year.  Since 2006 Rotary has raised over $355,000 for kids at risk in Vancouver.  We are making a difference!
 
"Cross Egypt Challenge" that aims to promote tourism to Egypt and prove that Egypt is still safe for tourism.  Rotary Club of Alexandria Cosmopolitan - District 2451 –

Cross Egypt Challenge is an international cross-country motorcycle and scooter adventure tour conducted throughout the majestic and fascinating Egypt. Participation is open for Rotarians and non-Rotarians a like and their accompanying spouses or friends from around the globe. People who do not ride motorcycles can also join this amazing adventure and be hosted in air-conditioned chase vans.

This amazing Rotary project started in 2011 and for the past 8 years, Rotarians and riders from over 45 countries took part in the adventurous challenge. This year the challenge will start on October 17 and will last for 10 days and will pass by Egypt's top attractions and off the beaten track destinations. 

A normal practice we are used to conduct during Cross Egypt Challenge is an annual "Sahara Rotary Meeting" where participating Rotarians along with Rotaracts from our organizing team conduct an official Rotary meeting in the Egyptian Desert –
 
 
Rotary Friendship Exchange to Russia:
Join the Rotary Friendship Exchange to Russia August 19 to September 2, 2019. A group of 10 to 12 people from our Rotary District 5040 will visit fellow members in Rotary District 2223. But hurry. Deadline to apply is June 15, 2019. Partners, family friends welcome. Visas are required.
 
2019 - 2020 District Leadership Team Installation

Saturday 22 June 2019 6 PM

Riverside Banquet Halls
14500 River Road
Richmond BC

Register Now!

Last date to purchase tickets 14 June 2019

$60 per Person
 
Don Evans Memorial Service
Don's love for trains is also evident with his involvement with the West Coast Railway Assoc and the creation of the West Coast Railway Heritage Park in Squamish.
This is where Don's memorial will take place.
 
JULY 7th, 2019
Westcoast Railway Heritage Park Roundhouse @ 2:00 PM.
 
Again, out thoughts and prayers are with Don's wife Deb, and his children and families at this time.
 
 
MARK YOUR CALENDAR:  June 29 Club BBQ at Leigh’s House.
 
Club Directors Meeting:
After our meeting on May 31
Alida Jurconi is back from Hawaii for the summer.  She treated us to chocolate covered macadamia nuts.  Yummm!   
 
Our own Bill Bourlet is also back for the summer.  
 
 
 
 
Imaging used to study anatomy and organ function are:  
  • Radiation useslight, heat, ultraviolet rays, microwaves, radio waves and electric current.
  • Ionizing radiationis used in x-ray and nuclear medicine – discharge of particles such as electron form an atom.
  • Radioisotopes or radionuclideare unstable form of a chemical element that releases radiation as it breaks down and becomes more stable.  Different isotopes bind to different tissues.
  • Tomographyis imaging by sections or slices.
  • Contrast mediumare substances ingested or injected to increase delineation of structures (ex. Barium, iodine, gadolinium). 
 
Examples of medical imaging using ionizing radiation are:
  • X-ray:  radiography is used for static 2D imaging of areas such as chest, skull, hand, etc.  Usually, at least two perpendicular views are taken for better evaluation.  
  • Fluoroscopylooks at the structure in movement or continuous motion to study gastro-intestinal tract (esophagus, stomach, bowel) and blood vessels (angiography), the spinal fluid (myelography). 
  • CT scan  combines the x-ray beam with powerful computer calculations.
  • Nuclear medicine uses short acting man-made radioisotopes of various elements to selectively accumulate in tissues, in order to study function or locate disease.  Some examples are bone scan with technetium-99 to look for spread of cancer to bone, or thyroid scan with iodine-131 to locate hyperfunctioning nodule.
  • PET scan uses very short acting isotope of glucose to locate very active cells, such as cancer cells.  CT scan or MRI are superimposed at the same time to locate deposits in space, as 3D image reconstructions.  
 
Examples of treatment using ionizing radiation (radiation therapy) are:
  • External radiation therapy, also called external beam radiation therapy uses high powered beams of energy to kill cancer cells. 
  • Internal radiation therapyputs radioactive substances into the body.  Needles or “seeds” can be inserted in tumour tissues.  Radioisotope such as iodine 131 can be swallowed to treat an overactive thyroid gland or thyroid cancer.  
 
Examples of medical imaging and/or treatment without inonizing radiation:
  • Ultrasounduses sound waves to distinguish solid from fluid.   It is used to guide biopsies, various tube insertions, locate brain or spinal cord abnormalities intra-operatively.  Obstetrical ultrasound is used to study fetal development.  Echocardiography is used to study heart.  Duplex ultrasound is used to check blood vessels in extremities and neck. Lithotripsy is used to turn kidney stones to sand.  
  • MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) uses radio waves and powerful magnets combined with computers to produce images of soft tissues, including bone marrow.   MRI of brain and spinal cord looks for signs of blood vessel damage, brain injury, cancer, stroke.  
 
Almost everyone can donate blood when it is used for research.  Five of us went in the van from Granville Gardens (thanks Donna) to UBC to donate blood.  It is more fund in a group and they had great snacks after!
 
Show your support for the cause by making a donation and/or showing up to the walk at River Market - 810 Quayside Drive, New Westminster, B.C.
 
8:00 am   volunteers to show up
9:00 am   registration opens
9:30 am   opening ceremony
10:00 am   walk begins  
 
Donate to team “Rotary Club of Vancouver Arbutus” 
 
Jenna Wadden & Maya Pasut thanked the Rotary Club of Vancouver Arbutus for sponsoring their RYLA adventure.  Not knowing anybody except each other, they were nervous and scared when they arrived at Camp Elphinstone.  They were immediately separated into team yellow and team blue. Through mingle game and team bonding activities, a group of strangers became good friends during the fun filled weekend.  
 
Attendees participated in professional development workshops with emphasis on 5 F’s: faith, freedom, family, future & fun.  They discovered their personality traits – artistic versus analytical.  Groups tackled community projects such as homelessness and vaping amongst youth.  In doing so, they gained self confidence and leadership skills through group effort, idea collaboration, and presentation skills.
 
Attendees learned about Rotary International, and that young people are also involved in Rotary.  They met and became friends with people from other cities and other countries.  They discovered that everybody is a leader.  
The Walk for Polio, held on New Westminster's famous riverside Quay is a joint venture between Burnaby and New Westminster Rotary Clubs.  this year Rotary Arbutus members will be walking with them on May 26th.  
 
The walk is to support child polio victims to get rehabilitation in two hospitals in Ethiopia.  Children will be treated by physios in Addis and Hawasa hospitals and their parents will be trained to provide after care when the children return home.  Polio eradication is a big area of service for Rotarians around the world.  What is often misunderstood in the western world is that children do contract the disease and that their care in the many years following, must also be a focus of the effort.
 
The project is underway and entering its second year in what is already a very successful operation.  
 
Our members are very happy to be part of this important work.  We are also looking forward to a walk - on a sunny May day -- for a very good cause.
7 years ago, Ilan pledged to donate $100 per month to Rotary for 10 years.   He is now in his 8th year of monthly giving.  

The Paul Harris Fellow program recognizes individuals who contribute, or who have contributions made in their name, of $1,000 to The Rotary Foundation of Rotary International.

The honor was established in 1957 to show appreciation for contributions that support Rotary’s Annual Fund, PolioPlus, or an approved Foundation grant.
 
Sustainability is something everyone can work towards.  Whether it is picking up garbage you see on the street or boycotting a company that practices environmentally harmful business mothods, we all can make a difference. 
 
5 things you can do starting today
  • Buy local/seasonal and buy food from which you can spell the ingredients
  • Refuse plastic at the store and bring your own bag or coffee mug
  • Recycle, reuse, repair
  • Eat less meat and if you do, buy organic at the butcher
  • If you can choose, use glass over plastic packaging or even no packaging
 
Seasonal calendar for BC (click to download) 
 
 
Gerry Dearing spoke to us about the work of the Sunshine Foundation Canada, an organisation that makes dreams come true for children aged 7 – 18 who have disabilities or life threatening illnesses. They have been operating for 50 years and serve kids from across Canada.
 
Their aim is not just to bring joy but also to help the children build resilience and confidence.  Children dream up their own experiences and then the Foundation provides a team who can provide specialised equipment, medical expertise and about 6 months of planning to make it happen.
 
All dreams are examined by a medical advisor team to make sure it is possible and safe for the child to undertake the dream.
 
Some dreams are modest – like to child who wanted an accessible swing in his school playground, others require months of preparation to help a child get ready for their dream day.  The preparation is a big part of the program and gives the child a sense of agency and independence.  It also represents a chance to plan for something that is not part of their on-going challenges with medical conditions.  Individual dream experiences involve the whole family.
 
There is also a group component to the Sunshine Foundation’s work. Periodically, they do a DREAM LIFT for a whole plane-full of 80 children who spend one day going to Disneyland. Children from the eastern parts of Canada go to Disneyland Florida and those from Western Canada go to Disneyland California.  The trip is undertaken in one very long day and the children travel independently from their families.  Teams of volunteers accompany the children, and a “Team Orange” – named for the fact that Disneyland is in Orange County in both locations – meets them at the airport to take care of their needs while they are visiting Disneyland.  
 
It is a remarkable effort and a magical day for all concerned as the children make new friends and have experiences that can truly be called a chance in a life-time.
 
The Foundation, though it only has 12 staff, is planning to expend its operation in BC.  They currently alternate the Dream Lift between East and West coasts and only do one trip every 4 years coming from the West.  
 
As Gerry said, their efforts are all about the kids hearing and experiencing “yes” in their lives.  
 
 
Come and donate blood with us!  Wednesday, May 15th, 1 pm at the Blood for Research Facility at UBC.  It will take about 2 hours and doesn't cost you anything!  They will even pay for parking or transit.
To join our group please contact Mary Stark m_stark@telus.net 604-328-8985.
 
The speaker, Jean Paul Gravel, provided us with a disquisition on the general topic of relationships, beliefs, happiness and how to manage life generally. He had been born into an unsettled existence of violence, threats and uncertainty, from which beginnings he had developed the view that everybody is a fake, a principle of uncertainty that drove him into an exploration of the three tenets of life: each of us is embroiled in the obligation to think, feel and act … whether you like it or not. His conceit was a story of the inexperienced youth who, charged with the task of clearing a copse, spent so much time sharpening his axe that his inquisitors despaired of his ever being able to discharge his task. However, he eventually so refined the sharpness of the instrument that when he got to work, almost too late, his tool was so sharp that everything fell before him with plenty of time to spare. Such is life: one has to have prepared the requisites that life can be managed on one’s own terms. The adze must be properly honed before commencing to use it.
 
The exercise that followed was more demonstrative. Asked to stand up and face one’s neighbour about a foot apart, your learned correspondent found himself confronted by the redoubtable Mary. Required to look into one’s companion’s eyes for 30 seconds, I found myself looking into a mind in constant motion and obviously deeply attentive to some profound metaphysical concept. The profound silence that accompanied this undertaking evidently encompassed everybody, as the silence of deep thought was manifestly profound. (When I asked my profound partner whether she had seen something similarly enervating in my aura, she indicated that all that she saw was a tabula rasa; I did not know whether to be happy or sad with this revelation.) However, this reactive feeling apparently did not much matter: that component of the presentation ceased at the point of regaining our seats. 
 
We then moved onto ‘beliefs', these being demonstrated by the drawing of a little man in a boat approaching the edge of a saucer (apparently the rower believed that he was about to sail over the edge of the world, this represented by the saucer) and the segue into the fact that life is only an illusion and that we humans spend our lives pretending to be a confident reflection of who we actually are … or indeed, actually aren’t! Further, each of us has on average about 75,000 separate thoughts a day, none of which we remember (how then can we know how many we have? This, Jean Paul left unexplained). What we are seeking is the extension of our lives and perceptions into Emotional Freedom, of which there are 3 levels, which eventually will lead to happiness (for all, or individually: who would know unless we have sharpened our minds by limiting our beliefs?) And there we are, back to the beliefs with which the enigmatic question of fakery began 27 minutes before. 
 
A very thought-provoking intellectual journey was had by all.
 
 
This week Past District Governor Leigh Higinbotham had the pleasure of inducting our newest member - Donna Patterson.  Donna is a marketing manager at Verves Senior Living and will share her talents in marketing and fundraising with us.  Welcome to Rotary Donna!
On April 5th we had Janet McManus, the manager from the netCAD Blood for Research Facility speak to us about their very important work.  It is part of Canadian Blood Services and drives world-class innovation in blood products for  transfusion, cellular therapy, and transplants.  It is also an independent non-profit agency linked to a world-wide network of  blood product agencies.  However, it is also one-of a kind in the world, doing this work on a national Canadian-wide level and making our blood services one of the best internationally. They supply blood products for researchers all across Canada for virus research and many other health and blood-related issues. They also test the equipment  used for collection, transfusion and storage of blood products.
 She explained how the blood they collect is separated into its 3 or more  component parts – all of which have a different “shelf-life” for use in hospitals and  trauma centres.  For instance, trauma doctors in the military require very  particular and special services in this regard.   Janet also told us how donors who have been told they are not eligible to donate blood can donate, at the research site, for research purposes.  Their blood is also used to help improve processes at our Canadian Blood Services Agency.For those wanting to donate to this unique agency, Janet explained that they have donor days on Mondays and Wednesdays and can take 45 donors in one day, no waiting!  Parking is paid for and sometimes they provide pizza!                   
Janet also told us how donors who have been told they are not eligible to donate   blood can donate, at the research site, for research purposes.  Their blood is also used to help improve processes at our Canadian Blood Services Agency.     
      Several Rotarians and visitors attended the meeting specifically to learn more about this unique opportunity because due to extensive travel, place of birth or  other health factors they have not been able to donate and would very much like to do so.   Our own member, Mary Stark, sprang into action and got all the details so that  club members could join a group donation day when we can donate together.  For those more inclined to act independently, you can find out if you may be eligible to donate at netCAD, you can also contact them directly:
Email: researchdonations@blood.ca Phone: 604-221-5515           Address: University Marketplace (at UBC) 207-2150 Western Parkway
 
 
 
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Speakers
Brody MacDonald - Interfaith Fellow
Jul 19, 2019
UN Alliance of Civilizations
President Lydia
Jul 26, 2019
Evening Fellowship Meeting
No meeting today
Aug 02, 2019
BC day long weekend
No meeting
Aug 30, 2019
Labour Day Long weekend
No meeting
Oct 11, 2019
Thanksgiving Weekend
No meeting
Nov 08, 2019
Remembrance Day
No Meeting
Dec 20, 2019
Members will be making Pancakes at Sexsmith Community School
No meeting
Dec 27, 2019
Happy New Year