Club Information

Welcome to our Club!

SOKC Rotary

Service Above Self

We meet Fridays at 12:00 PM
Integris Southwest Medical Cancer Center
4401 S Western Avenue
Oklahoma City, OK  73109-3413
United States
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Club Executives & Directors
President
Treasurer
Secretary
Immediate Past President
Club Service Projects
Director at Large
Sergeant At Arms
Membership
Public Relations
Club Administration Committee
 
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Upcoming Speakers
Dr. Neil Suneson
Oct 27, 2017
Retired Geologist
Travis Johnson
Nov 10, 2017
Public Speaker
Scott Inman
Nov 17, 2017
State Representative
NO MEETING
Nov 24, 2017
HAPPY THANKSGIVING!
 
Home Page Stories
 
U.S. Representative Steve Russell (OK-05)
A native Oklahoman, Steve Russell graduated from Del City High School as class president and was voted "most likely to succeed." In college he completed the Army ROTC program and later earned a master’s degree from the Command and General Staff College. Russell began his 21-year career in the U.S. Army as a commissioned 2nd Lieutenant-Army Infantry where he completed the rigorous U.S. Army Ranger School in Class 11-87. He deployed to assignments in the Arctic, the desert, the Pacific, Europe and Continental U. S. stations. Operationally, he was deployed to Kosovo, Kuwait, Afghanistan, and Iraq. During Operation Iraqi Freedom, Russell commanded the 1st Battalion, 22nd Infantry which played a key role in the capture of Saddam Hussein.  These events are documented in his book, We Got Him! A Memoir of the Hunt and Capture of Saddam Hussein.  Before retiring as a Lieutenant Colonel, Russell earned the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star with Valor Device, and Oak Leaf Cluster. He returned to Oklahoma with his wife, Cindy, and their five children, three of which were adopted from Hungary. Continuing his service to his state and country, he was elected to the Oklahoma State Senate in 2008, leading efforts to protect the unborn, combat human trafficking, improve veterans benefits, and reform the adoption process.  Elected to the U.S. House in 2014, Russell continues to be an advocate for our national defense and veterans, protecting the unborn, and reforming government - compiling and releasing four editions of his Congressional Waste Watch. Each edition highlights examples of government waste and duplication of services resulting in numerous bills and amendments saving taxpayers billions of dollars. Russell continues his service hosting public town hall meetings and visiting personally with constituents. Russell is the founder and owner of Two Rivers Arms, a small rifle manufacturing business which has products featured in numerous trade publications and even in the Clint Eastwood movie, American Sniper. He and Cindy make their home in Choctaw, Oklahoma, and are members of First Southern Baptist Church of Del City
 
Neil Suneson
 
Neil started working with the Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS) in 1986, mapping the northern Ouachita Mountains and Arkoma Basin as part of the STATEMAP project.
Following this work, he and his colleagues completed some reconnaissance mapping in northwest Oklahoma and detailed mapping of the Oklahoma City metro area. Before joining the Survey, Neil received his Ph.D. from the University of California Santa Barbara, after which he worked for Chevron Resources Company and Chevron USA in the Bay Area.
In addition to his work on Oklahoma stratigraphy and petroleum plays, Neil has taught the University of Oklahoma’s field camp in Colorado and a course on subsurface methods in petroleum exploration and development.
He has published a number of papers and guidebooks, mostly on the stratigraphy and structure of southern Oklahoma. His current interest is completing “Roadside Geology of Oklahoma” for Mountain Press Publishing Company.
ARTICLE 6 - FEES AND DUES 
Section 1. The admission fee shall be $25.00 to be paid before the applicant can qualify as a member. 
Section 2. The membership dues shall be $140 per year, and shall be payable quarterly at $35 per quarter, billed on the first day of July, October, January, and April, with the understanding that a portion of each quarterly payment shall be applied to each member’s subscription to the RI official magazine. Dues are payable within thirty (30) days of the billing date. The Treasurer shall be responsible for notification to members whose dues are not timely remitted. Any member who becomes more than 60 days past due shall be notified that they will be dropped from membership if the amount owed is not brought current within thirty (30) days. Any member whose dues are not remitted after such notification shall be dropped from membership at the next regularly scheduled board meeting, unless that member has a payment plan approved by the board of directors. 
 
 
President's remarks:
It is absolutely no one's intent to arbitrarily remove Rotarians and diminish the potential of South OKC Rotary.  In order to carry out the mission and goals of Rotary International, we utterly depend on each member paying their dues and meal costs in a timely manner.  Also, each Rotarian paying on time eliminates the additional administrative cost and burden of having to initiate collection process.
 
Thank you for your continued support.
 
Todd Feehan
President
 
GUIDING PRINCIPLES
 
These principles have been developed over the years to provide Rotarians with a strong, common purpose and direction. They serve as a foundation for our       relationships with each other and the action we take in the world.
 
OBJECT OF ROTARY
The Object of Rotary is to encourage and foster the ideal of service as a basis of worthy enterprise and, in particular, to encourage and foster:
FIRST: The development of acquaintance as an opportunity for service;
SECOND: High ethical standards in business and professions; the recognition of the worthiness of all useful occupations; and the dignifying of each Rotarian’s   occupation as an opportunity to serve society;
THIRD: The application of the ideal of service in each Rotarian’s personal,       business, and community life;
FOURTH: The advancement of international understanding, goodwill, and peace through a world fellowship of business and professional persons united in the   ideal of service.
 
THE FOUR-WAY TEST
The Four/Way Test is a nonpartisan and nonsectarian ethical guide for Rotarians to use for their personal and professional relationships. The test has been   translated into more than 100 languages, and Rotarians recite it at club meetings:
Of the things we think, say or do
  1. Is it the TRUTH?
  2. Is it FAIR to all concerned?
  3. Will it build GOODWILL and BETTER FRIENDSHIPS?
  4. Will it be BENEFICIAL to all concerned?
 
AVENUES OF SERVICE
We channel our commitment to service at home and abroad through five     Avenues of Service, which are the foundation of club activity.
  1. Club Service focuses on making clubs strong. A thriving club is anchored by strong relationships and an active membership development plan.
  2. Vocational Service calls on every Rotarian to work with integrity and      contribute their expertise to the problems and needs of society. 
  3. Community Service encourages every Rotarian to find ways to improve   the quality of life for people in their communities and to serve the public   interest. 
  4. International Service exemplifies our global reach in promoting peace and understanding. We support this service avenue by sponsoring or        volunteering on international projects and seeking partners abroad.
  5. Youth Service recognizes the importance of empowering youth and young professionals through leadership development programs such as RotaractInteractRotary Youth Leadership Awards, and Rotary Youth Exchange.
 
 
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