Rotary Club of Faribault

 
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Meeting Responsibilities
Club Services
Attendance/Greeter
Reese, Mary
 
Attendance/Greeter
Ciesluk, Gregory
 
Sergeant At Arms
Sesker, Todd
 
Fellowship
Peroutka, Brent
 
 
 
 

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Welcome - Join us at our weekly meeting!

Join us at Rotary!

Faribault

Rotary connects the World!

We meet Wednesdays at 12:15 PM
Inn at Shattuck- St. Mary's
1000 Shumway Ave.
Faribault, MN  55021
United States of America
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Home Page Stories
Did you know that on June 8, 1960, the Faribault Rotary Club voted unanimously to create a separate corporation to provide an overnight camping area on the shore of Cedar Lake. The name FARIBAULT ROTARY YOUTH CAMP was chosen for the project. All members of the Faribault Rotary Club are members of the Faribault Youth Services, Inc. The Faribault Girl Scouts had been planing to build a Girl Scout Camp.  When they learned that the Rotary club was also interested, they offered to join the project with a contribution of $9,000. This covered the cost of the 18 acre site.
 
Rotarians have spent many hours working on the grounds and many dollars over the years to provide a well, the shelter, dock facilities, the septic system and insurance.

How it works

To download the app from the Apple App Store or from Google Play, simply type in 'ClubRunner' in the search bar. Our mobile app is compatible with all versions of the iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch sets that have iOS 8.0 or later and with versions of Anrdoids that are 4.0.3 or better.  Click on this link!    Download the ClubRunner App today!

The ClubRunner Mobile App is your key to connect to our club and district on the go!

Completely, free to download and use, this app will let you access the key info you need while you're on the go. Password protected just like your website, the ClubRunner Mobile app allows you to to view our member directory, contact any Faribault Rotary Club member, read the latest articles posted to our website, learn more about our upcoming events and speakers, view our meeting details and track your attendance statistics, right from your smartphone or tablet!

image02 Member Directory

Immediately view the most up to date member directory, upon login. You can browse your member profiles which give you the necessary contact information you need to connect with just one click. Make a call or text, email them directly from your device, or even add them to your contacts list.

image05 Club & District Executives and Directors

View and contact your club/district executives and directors from current, past and future years. You can browse their profiles and connect with one tap.

image02 View Posts on Your Website

View the latest feed of home page stories that are on your own website and your district's site, directly on your phone, so you never miss any information!

 
image05 Explore upcoming events and speakers

Access all of your upcoming events and calendar items, and view event details, including associated links, download files and venue map. View who the latest speakers are and learn more about their presentation topic - both for your club and district.

image05 Club Details

View your meeting day, time and venue, complete with a Google map for directions through the new Club Info page right from your phone. Even get quick access to contact your club President, Area Governor and District Governor.

image02 Keep track of your attendance

Keep track of your attendance stats and banked makeups. Easily view which meetings you attended, missed and made up and get a quick glance at your attendance percentage for the year. Switch to the Makeups tab and view a list of your banked makeups.

 

I encourage you to add this app to your smart phone or tablet. You only have to login once and you will be able to call, text or email any club member from your device.  if you have any questions, please let me know.

 

Murray

In just 32 weeks, the Faribault Rotary Club will celebrate its 100-year anniversary on May 1, 2020.  This week’s historical highlight is from 1985.
 
The club completes four successful weeks in January with meals on wheels.
Local resident, Bill Korf, was elected President of the State Fair Board. He gave a program highlighting the history of the Minnesota State Fair from 1859 to present.
A group study exchange team from Brazil visited the club.
The club participated in the 6th annual Service Club Olympics.
The Annual Honors Banquet was held at the Senior High.
The annual picnic was held at the Rotary Camp.
There was a program on Haley’s comet which was visible in late 1985.
The club was given a tour of the new Junior High School Building.
 
Our club’s 65th president in 1984-85 was Donelly Martinson.

HealthFinders

Our old friend Stephen Pribyl with Charles Mandile came to share the direction and purpose of HealthFinders Collaborative. HealthFinders has been filling the gap in healthcare since 2002, Ensuring health care access for everyone in our community.

Charles expressed health is much more than health care. The appointments and doctor visits we make are only a sliver of what makes up one's health. HealthFinders mission is to provide equal health care to all. Advocate for equality in health care system. 

HealthFinders supports Rice county with locations in Northfield and Faribault. Their services range from medical check-ups, health education to assistance with medical insurance applications with MNsure, etc.  30% of their services are made outside the offices, providing screening on-sight at local elementary schools and other locations. 

Key partners Allina, Mayo, Sterling, Delta Dental to name a few, HealthPartners is looking to advance their reach of service to our community. HealthFinders holds a monthly summit, bringing many of these competitors together to talk about how they can work together, better community health and bring down the cost of health care. 

Two thirds of the services are from the Faribault area. There seems to be a growing need in the community for the services. HealthFinders, with the support of their partners are embarking on the construction of a new health center in Faribault.

HealthFinders looks to continue their community improvement of health in many ways for many years to come. Their benefit to the community in worth, cannot be measured by their complete effect upon the community. Although HealthFinders did run a study which figured for every dollar spent, the return is $16.50 to the health care system’s cost. To contribute to their cause, connect at https://healthfindersmn.org/donate/.

 

Fun and Fellowship

 

Beautiful night!

 

No arrests!

 

The kids had a great time!

 

Great food!

In just 33 weeks, the Faribault Rotary Club will celebrate its 100-year anniversary on May 1, 2020.  This week’s historical highlight is from 1984.
 
The club took the annual Rotary Ann party on the road with a bus to the Old Log Theatre.
Rotary District 596 Mid-Term Evaluation was held in January at Shattuck.
There was a club program on the formation of the new Faribault Area Hospice.
Gayle Mahler (Rod and Jean’s daughter) presented a talk about her recent mission trip to the Philippines.
Northwest Airlines President Steve Rothmeier talked to the club about the Airline industry.
The club was given an update on the U.S. Postal system and to get use to the new extra 4 numbers given to each zip code.
The highly anticipated classification talk from Donn Johnson was well received.
Judy Fruehbrodt, our Rotary exchange student to Sweden gave a lively presentation to the club about life on the farm, learning Swedish, their school system and other social activities. Today, Dr. Judy Fruehbrodt- Glenzinzki is a physician here in Faribault.
Minnesota Governor Al Quie gave a non-political talk to the club about his perceptions of power bases in America.
State Auditor and future Minnesota Governor Arne Carlson spoke to the club.
 
Our club’s 64th president in 1983-84 was Tom Gagnon.

Gary Amaroso

     Our speaker and visitor last week were Gary Amoroso who is the Executive Director for Minnesota School Superintendents. He was invited to come speak by our very own Todd Sesker. Gary is in his 43rd year of being a part of the education system. He started as a social studies teacher in Wisconsin and followed the path to administration after being tapped on the shoulder as a candidate to the positions. Gary was the school superintendent for Lakeville Schools for 10 years before starting as the Executive Director in 2011. He truly believes that all jobs and positions are not possible without the education from all our teachers, in school and at home.
 
      Minnesota School Superintendents are focused on giving resources and support to their members throughout Minnesota. The superintendent position can be a lonely spot because their peers are spread out through the state. This group provides the tools to the superintendents that they need to be successful and a support team that is behind them all the way. There are 600 plus active members and they are working with the most important part of our society, the children.
 
     Another big part of the Minnesota School Superintendents is the work that they do with the state legislature to help represent our school systems and help get important bills passed including the snow days bill. Gary stated that they do not want something to go into congress and yet have nothing get done, so there is a good part of their focus that works with the legislature on the school bills.
     Gary will be retiring in 2020 and is looking forward to the change but is still passionate on how education can change the country.
 

Presidential message

2019-20 RI President Mark Daniel Maloney

Mark Daniel Maloney

President 2019-20

September 2019

Here in the United States, another summer is winding down. And for the Maloney family, every summer ends with a return to my hometown of Ridgway, Illinois, for the annual Popcorn Day festival, where I am honored to serve as the “Popcorn King,” the master of ceremonies for the day’s events. 

Regardless of the season, every family has its own traditions. I would like to suggest a new one for yours: Find an opportunity to introduce your family to Rotary. One of my family’s traditions is to take our daughters and grandsons to the Rotary International Convention. The 2020 convention in Honolulu will be a wonderful way to introduce your children and grandchildren to the internationality of Rotary. We are planning many family-oriented events for everyone to enjoy.

Any time is a fabulous time to bring family members on a Rotary service project or to a fundraising event. But perhaps you have not seen many family-friendly events at your club. That is precisely why one of my top priorities this year is to make most Rotary events welcoming to family members.

We must foster a culture where Rotary does not compete with family, but complements it. We should never expect our members to choose between the two. That means being realistic in our expectations, considerate in our scheduling, and welcoming of children at Rotary events on every level.

Often, the young professionals that Rotary needs to attract in order to remain a dynamic 21st-century service organization are the very people who have the greatest family responsibilities. We must not keep these prospective young members away from their families by holding events on evenings and weekends at which their children are not welcome.

For too long, we have closed the doors of many Rotary events to children and sometimes even spouses. What wasted opportunities these are! Every chance we have to pass on the gift of Rotary to young people is one we must take if we are going to grow Rotary and ensure that the next generation is fully engaged in our mission.

So let us open our doors and do it in a fun way, with opportunities that make our children and grandchildren want to learn more about Interact, Rotaract, and Rotary membership. Start small if you must — perhaps by holding some of your meetings at more family-friendly times — but think about how you can continue these kinds of events for years to come.

Bringing children to Rotary events is not just fun; it also exposes them to the world! Make this a memorable year for your family — and an unforgettable year for the ever-expanding family of Rotary as Rotary Connects the World.

    All Rotarians and their guests are invited to the club's annual picnic on Wednesday Sept. 4th at 5:30 pm at the Rotary Camp on Cedar Lake.  Directions are available on the website.  Students, children and Rotary exchange students and host families are free and all other guests and members are $15.  There will be activities for the kids and fun for everyone.
 
There will be no noon meeting this week!

Nominations requested

The Rotarian of the Year Award provides the Faribault Rotary Club with an opportunity to publicly recognize one of its members who exemplifies the ideals of the Rotary Four-Way Test, exhibits a true spirit of volunteerism, demonstrates community leadership through participation in Rotary committees, programs, and activities.
The Rotarian of the Year Award will be based on one or all of the following criteria:

> The nominee has provided outstanding contributions to one or more Rotary activities.
> The nominee has demonstrated leadership to the club in general, or within one or more Rotary programs.
> The nominee displays the ideals of Rotary in service to the greater community.
> Holding an office or serving on the Board of Directors neither prohibits nor promotes a member for nomination.
 
Past award winners are as follows:
2008- Gary Peterson
2009- Dave Beranek
2010- Richard Cook
2011- Angela Storch
2012-Lisa Humfeld- Wilson
2013- Rick Ormsby
2014- Brent Peroutka
2015- Murray Hanson
2016- Kymn Anderson
2017- Dick Huston
2018- George Wickstrom
 
Please give your nomination to Brent Peroutka in person or send it via email (brent@cwsfbo.com), no later than September 27, 2019.

Teacher exchange program

     Ryan Krominga Director of Teaching and Learning for Faribault Public Schools shared his experiences setting up the Djibouti teacher exchange program. A partnership to help understand what Somali refugees come with when they arrive in our local school program. Placing teachers in their home settings, to better their understanding of environment and learning concepts from their home. 
 
     Ryan was accompanied in collaboration with Dr Jill Wilson of Northfield Public Schools and Dr. Martha Bigelo of the U of MN. The choice of the region/state of Djibouti was made on many factors including access of major port, diversity of languages and most importantly safety level from civil conflict. 
 
     Djibouti was settled as a French colony, including French 4 other languages are commonly spoken in this region. The school system had many similarities to our own. The school year was divided into semesters or quarters. The school buildings themselves mirror the look of an open California school campuses. There were notable differences as well. The school day was split in two shifts, morning and night. Technology was very limited, although most students had their own cell phone. 
 
     They also visited the refugee camp Ali Adpeh which was miles away from structured roads in the dessert. This camp, home to 17,000 refugees was built from what they could find and use. Although, in hardship education was given to every child in Ali Adpeh. There has been a focus to teach in English to students to allow better access to great opportunities globally. 
 
     There are many misconceptions of the refugees we see in our community that Ryan was able to understand are not true. These kids come from a diverse area, know many languages. They are well exposed to English, they come from a structured system of education.
 
     The Djibouti teacher exchange program will continue with a St. Olaf sending a group in 2021, along with the U of MN sending graduate students soon after. If you would like to learn more about this program, please feel free to reach out to Ryan Krominga at his public-school office.

 
 
 
 

Welcome Keith!

Keith Kniefel (second from left) an accountant from Reese, Winter & Associates has joined the Faribault Rotary Club. He was sponsored by Dave Beranek (far left.) They are pictured here with membership chair and past president, Keith Kramer and current president Amy Amundson. 

Camp Improvements!

This article was in the Daily News Aug. 28, 1980.
In just 39 weeks, the Faribault Rotary Club will celebrate its 100-year anniversary on May 1, 2020.  This week’s historical highlight is from 1978.
 
The club overwhelmingly supported the proposed amending of the Rotary constitution which would allow women to become Rotarians.” This change was adopted at the Rotary International Convention.
There was a program informing the club of plans for the state amateur baseball tournament to be played in Faribault in late August.
The club toured the yard and gardens of Roger Koopmans.
The Youth Camp was used by 3562 campers.
The 14th annual Youth service Benefit Concert was held in the Junior High Auditorium. The Senior High Choir was directed by Donn Johnson and the Orchestra by Dr. Richard Skewes.
Congressman Al Quie spoke about the race for Minnesota Governor and was accompanied by U.S. Senate Candidate Dave Durenberger. TV cameras were present at the meeting.
Pastor Lowell Lundstrom spoke to the club about his evangelical ministry.
 
Our club’s 58th president in 1977-78 was Dean Purdie.
 

Tradition

Past President Keith Kramer was all smiles when he accepted his plaque for recognition of his excellent year of service as the Faribault Rotary Club's 99th president. He is pictured here with current president, Amy Amundson.

Dick Huston

Dick Huston returned from a Rotary Exchange trip to Germany last month. He was able to exchange flags with 7 other Rotary clubs. He was able to sew the flags onto one of our banners and they are now on display at each meeting.  If you get a chance to visit with him about the trip, please do so. Thank you Dick for representing our club!

Passing the gavel: Faribault Rotary inducts its 100th president

Reprinted with permission from the Faribault Daily News

Hand to hand, a gavel passed through 31 past presidents of the Faribault Rotary Club until it reached Amy Amundson — the 100th president.

The passing of the gavel signifies the effort and dedication of each president, those in attendance and those unable to attend, to bring the club through its first 100 years, practicing the Rotary tradition of “Service above Self” and showing full support for Amundson and her year of service focused projects.

Amundson was sworn in as president Wednesday by her predecessor, Keith Kramer.

Each year, Rotary Presidents help oversee and administer service-oriented projects to benefit the community as well as expand the reach of the club.

In Kramer’s year, the Faribault Rotary Club ran the Warm Our Community event for the first year and added a Habitat for Humanity workday where volunteers helped paint a house on the north side of town.

Warm Our Community is a clothing drive in November to collective gently used outerwear — gloves, coats, boots — so area kids can keep warm during the notoriously frigid Minnesota winters. After the drive, people in the community are invited to stop by and pick out as many items as they need.

Kramer also continued the sponsorship of the Faribault Rotaract Club — a service minded organization in which South Central College students organize themselves and complete projects in the community.

One of the Rotaract Club projects this year was volunteering at Believet Canine Service Partners, which trains dogs and provides them to veterans free of charge.

“Veterans who suffer from PTSD or a visible disability who can’t get around as easily anymore without interruptions tend to confine themselves to their homes,” Rotaract President Piper Nelson said. “It’s debilitating, but with the help of these service dogs, veterans can get back to enjoying life and completing basic everyday activities.”

Though the students were not qualified to help with the training, they did care for the dogs and took them on walks. They also had the opportunity to learn from watching a veteran work with a service dog.

“For us, this is a huge deal,” Nelson said. “It’s not just picking up garbage in a park, which also makes an impact, but this is something that directly impacts not only each of us Rotaractors, but also the dogs and the vets. It’s more than doing something to gain something in return; it’s doing something hoping to help another in the best way possible.”

“This year has been a big success,” Kramer said. “We do things once and learn what we can do better next time… It’s an opportunity to get involved in one or more areas you’re passionate about. It’s awesome people, doing awesome things.”

Volunteering since 1920, Rotary members are continuing to better the community into their 100th year as well.

Rotary clubs can be found throughout the world. Just last week, Rotary member Richard Huston added 10 flags from three different continents — Australia, Germany and the United States — to the 80 flags representing locations where Faribault Rotarians have visited other Rotary Clubs.

This year’s universal mission of Rotary Clubs is to connect the world.

“We want to bring about world peace by connecting people around the world,” Amundson said. “When you have friends in a different place, you care more about that place.”

The mission of connecting people also impacts people on a local level.

“The vast majority of the club is youth focused,” Amundson said. “Youth are important because they are our future in the community.”

Amundson said club members are involved, volunteering to read one-on-one with students as Rotary Readers; inspire kids and teach them about virtues at Respect and Courage Retreats; and help them increase their GPA as part of Faribault Schools’ STRIVE program. And that’s only a partial list, she said.

Faribault’s 59 Rotary members are always ready to lend a hand. For the 100th year, Amundson asked the members to keep track of every bit of service they provide in the hopes of achieving 5,900 acts of service i— 100 hours per person — n the community by next year.

“It’s surprising how many are doing this already,” Amundson said. “We’re always looking for more members to expand our impact. The more members we have the more good we can do in our community.”

Reporter Renata Erickson can be reached at 507-333-3129. Follow her on Twitter @FDNrenata.

©Copyright 2019 APG Media of Southern Minnesota. All rights reserved.

Past Presidents

BLAST FROM THE PAST

Past Faribault Rotary Presidents attending Wednesday's gavel passing were pictured from left to right:

1972-73: Rod Mahler 53rd

1973-74: Dr. Roy Anderson 54th

1989-90: Jim Nielson 70th

1991-92 Donn Johnson 72nd

1996-97: Don Olson, 77th

1997-98: Wade Karli, 78th

1998-99: Pastor Gordon Orde, 79th

2002-03: Darlene Meillier, 83rd

2004-05: Richard Cook, 85th

2007-08: Grant Wilson, 88th

2009-10: Dr. Lisa Humfeld-Wilson, 90th

2011-12: Dr. Murray Hanson, 92nd

2012-13: Kymn Anderson, 93rd

2013-14: Brent Peroutka, 94th

2014-15: Tony Langerud, 95th

2015-16: Dr. Richard Huston, 96th

2016-17: Jake Cook, 97th

2017-18: Troy Dunn, 98th

2018-19: Keith Kramer, 99th

2019-20 Next president, Amy Amundson, 100th

Just one year ago...

Just one year ago Keith Kramer was installed as our clubs 99th president. Tomorrow we install Amy Amundson as our 100th president. 

Brazil

President Keith exchanges flags with Marina who represents the Rotary Club of Marillia Brazil in Rotary District 4510. Her father has been a Rotary member since 1994.

Congratulations Dick!

Dick Huston and his wife, Nancie Huston, not pictured, were recognized last week as Rotary Foundation major donors by Rotary District Governor Mike Becker and next year's district governor, Paul Perez. Major donor honors are given when an individual(s) gives a total of $10,000 to the Rotary Foundation. Huston, second from right, is also a member of the Paul Harris Society, a recognition given to those who donate $1,000 in a year to the foundation. Only one other member of the Faribault Rotary Club — Marv Schrader — has been given this honor. The Rotary Foundation has six areas of focus: basic education & literacy, maternal & child health, water & sanitation, disease prevention & treatment, peace & conflict resolution, and economic & community development. Also pictured is Faribault Rotary Club President Keith Kramer, left.

Making a difference!

     Thank you to Keith, Laura and Natalie for painting and George & Brenda for providing food. There was some soreness reported by our distinguished president  in the days after. They are hopeful  that we can do another project for Habitat next year as it was a very rewarding experience.

Faribault Rotary Club

Last Wednesday, we celebrated our 99th anniversary to kickoff the countdown to 100 years on May 1, 2020. Over 60 people attended including Rotarians past and present, the next two district governors, family and friends. Thank you to everyone who helped make this a success.  The following speech was given by President Keith:
 
May 1, 1920- May 1 2019
 
 
 The Faribault Rotary Club was established 99 years ago today on May 1, 1920 as Rotary's 596th club with 22 charter members and by the end of the first-year membership had reached a total of 35.   
 
E.B. Johnson, representing the district governor of the International Rotary Clubs, and three other members of the Minneapolis Rotary Club met with our charter members.  The first President of the Faribault Rotary Club was Frank W. McKellip.
 
Meetings were held on the first and third Monday of each month and on the evening of the fourth Monday. By 1927 the weekly meeting time was moved to noon on Wednesdays and remained there to this day. Over the years the club has held its meetings at the Elks Club, Harvey Hotel, Bluebird Inn, Hotel Faribault, Evergreen Knoll, Faribault Country Club, the Elks Club (again,) Bernie’s Vintage Ballroom and now and possibly for the next 99 years ------The Inn at Shattuck.
 
By next year at our 100th anniversary, our club will have had approximately 5000 weekly meetings with our 61-year member, Rod Mahler attending over 2800 of those meetings.  
 
 
Our club has sponsored four other clubs: 1) Owatonna- 1922 2) Northfield- 1925 3) Cannon Falls- 1954 and 4) The new Rotaract club at South Central College this year.
 
Youth service whether local or international has been one of our objectives over the last 99 years. Some examples include the following:
  • In 1924 the club held a picnic for 290 boys at Roberds Lake.
  • The Youth Camp on Cedar Lake was dedicated in 1963 and is stayed an important part of our club to this day.
  • In 1994, our club sponsored a shelter for the street children of Santarem, Brazil which provided a place for them to meet in groups and participate in life improvement activities.
  • In 2010, we sponsored the Rotary youth soccer fields area at Bahl fields in the Faribault Soccer Complex and provide shirts every year through the “Little Feat” program.
  • In 2017, we were involved with the Buddy Benches that were installed at local elementary schools.
 
We have established a number of traditions that are still an important part of the Faribault Rotary Club.  In 1939 the Faribault High School Choir started a Christmas Concert tradition which will celebrate 80 years this December.
 
 
In 1965, the Faribault Senior High Band, Choir and Orchestra performed with the proceeds used for the benefit of the Faribault Youth Services Inc. This October will be the 54th year.
 
Rotary luncheon programs are varied and interesting. We have had Senators, congressman, state and local politicians come to report their views. Programs over the years included topics such as:
-The question in 1941 was “Does Faribault need an airport?
- “A program on Direct Dialing telephones and the new Highway 35 progress were highlights in 1961.
- In the last 10 years we had historically informational and international adventure programs from our own Rotarians George Wickstrom and Dick Huston.
Our program chairmen and members over the years have provided excellent programs
 
Our club has had six district governors and the last one, Layton Hoysler, was in 1974. We look forward to the next club member who fills that role in the future.
Women were able to join Rotary starting in 1988 with Janine Sahagian as the first to join our club and was president in 1999-00. This year we celebrate the installation of Amy Amundson as our 100th president for the 2019-2020 Rotary year on June 26th.  On May 1, 2020, one year from today, the Faribault Rotary club will celebrate its 100th anniversary with a pledge to continue service above self for the next 100 years and beyond!
 

Fun evening!

The table of past presidents.
Pastor Greg led us in singing with "Take me out to the Ballgame" from our 1967 songbooks!
Families enjoying the fire and s'mores!
Congratulations George!
 
Please join us as we celebrate our community's Hidden Gems as well as 2019 Citizen of the Year Sam Temple and Lifetime Achievement Award winner George Wickstrom. The recognition event begins with social time at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 15 at the Elks Lodge, 131 Lyndale Ave., N., and is sponsored by which is sponsored by the Faribault Daily News, the Faribault Area Chamber of Commerce, HomeTown Credit Union, Mill City Senior Living and The Virtues Project-Faribault. A buffet dinner will be served; program begins at 6 p.m. Tickets are $5 each and help support the the Hidden Gems program, which is sponsored by the Faribault Daily News and The Virtues Project-Faribault. You can access tickets though the first link below:
 
 

May 1, 1920

The Faribault Rotary Club was established 99 years ago today on May 1, 1920 as Rotary's 596th club with 22 charter members and by the end of the first-year membership had reached a total of 35.  Please come to our celebration of 99 years at 5pm tomorrow and President Kramer will  tell us the "Rest of the Story!"

Congratulations!

The Faribault Rotary Club received the District 5960 award as runner up in medium size club category for youth service. Pictured her receiving the award from District Governor, Mike Becker, at the Conference of Clubs last weekend in Rochester was our President-Elect 2019-20, Amy Amundson.

Congratulations!

Last Wednesday, we handed out 4 STRIVE (Student Taking Renewed Interest in the Value of Education) scholarships totaling $9000. Lauren Steinberg & Kevin Tovar each received a $2500 scholarship for the most improved GPA. Brook Flicek & Evelyn Nigon each received a $2000 for illustrating Rotarian values. 

New Club at South Central College

     The Faribault Rotaract Club recently received their charter at a Faribault Rotary Club meeting. The club is comprised of 28 students from South Central College and is open to all young adults who wish to provide service to the community. One of the group's service projects is to volunteer at Believet Canine Service Partners, which trains service dogs for veterans.
     The Rotaracts will host dogs in their homes on weekends, as well as feed, groom, walk and perform other care tasks. In addition, the group is working on creating a volunteer program at St. Lucas Care Center. For more information about the club, visit rotary5960.org/clubInfo/scc-rotaract.

Reprinted with permission from the Faribault Daily News

 

To some, he's a dedicated veterinarian. To some, a world traveler. To some, a proud Rotarian.

To all, he's Richard "Dick" Huston. There's no one way to define a man who's traveled to all seven continents, who's helped settle lawsuits dealing with cattle or who's been on the Minnesota Timberwolves' private plane.

Somehow the 1,000-piece puzzle comes together to create a mosaic of a man who won't let life come to him. Click on the "Read More" link below for the rest of the article.

 

The Faribault Rotary Club has placed a second "Little Free Library" at Our Savior's Lutheran Church to provide greater variety and meet a growing usage.  The "Little Free Library" program was begun by Rotarian Todd Bol of Hudson, WI in 2009.  He made the first one out of an old door in the shape of a school house to honor his mother who had been a school teacher. He put it in his front yard with his mother's books.  Since then 75,000 Little Libraries have been placed in all 50 states and 88 countries.  Improving basic education and literacy is one of Rotary International's area of focus.  Todd Bol died on October 18th from cancer at the age of 62.

Image result for red cross blood

This year's Rotary Red Cross Blood Drive was a great success. Thank you to our volunteers- 
Chuck, Troy, Dick, Kymn, Sarah, Erica, Peter, Brian, President Keith, Brenda, and Laura.
Twas a few weeks before Christmas, when all through downtown,
Not a Rotarian was stirring, no one to be found;
 
The invites were made by Donn Johnson with care,
In hopes that everyone would soon be there;
 
The Rotarians were nestled all snug in their beds;
While visions of Christmas concerts danced in their heads;
 
They knew in a moment the time had drawn near,
To sign-up with Donn and tell him no fear;
 
For we will be coming, even bringing a guest;
Looking forward to lunch and the choir's singing best;
 
More rapid than eagles the Faribault Rotarians came,
And Donn whistled and shouted and called them by name:
 
Now, Twitchell! Now, Rojas! Now, Leland and Sanchez!
On, Secraw! On, Jackson! On, Hjellming and Wilson!
 
To the seat of your cars! To the end of the street!
Now dash away! Dash away! And soon we will meet!
 
Then we heard Donn exclaim, as he walked out of sight;
"Happy Christmas to all, and to all a good night!"
 
All Rotarians, their families, and guests are invited to the 79th annual Faribault Rotary Christmas Concert to be held on Wednesday December 19th (11:45 am- 1:15 pm) at Our Savior's Lutheran Church. The joyful sounds of the holiday season will be brought to us by the Faribault High School Choir. Our host for over 30 years, Donn Johnson asks that you use the online sign up via email if you will be coming and bringing one or more guests.  The cost of the meal is $11 unless you are on the meal plan.
     

Faribault Daily News (reprinted with permission)

George Wickstrom

George Wickstrom attended the Faribault Rotary Club’s monthly meeting Nov. 14, not knowing he’d walk away with Rotarian of the Year honors.

“I didn’t realize it was going to happen,” said Wickstrom. “I didn’t think it would ever happen.”

Fellow Rotarians nominated Wickstrom for the award, then the past five Rotarians of the Year and Faribault Rotary President Keith Kramer selected Wickstrom as the winner among other nominees.

 

In his acceptance speech, Wickstrom read two poems he can recite by memory — “The Man in the Glass” by Peter Dale Wimbrow Sr. and “The Touch of the Master’s Hand” by Myra Brooks Welch.

Five of Wickstrom’s adult children, one daughter-in-law, and several friends surprised Wickstrom with their presence at the meeting.

Wickstrom became a Faribault Rotarian July 19, 1974. At the time, he didn’t know much about the club. But in his 44 years of membership, Wickstrom has come to consider Rotary “an outstanding organization.”

Through Rotary, Wickstrom reads to fourth-graders at Jefferson Elementary through the Rotary Readers program. He also helps with Meals on Wheels and helps tidy Cedar Lake for the Rotary Camp held there. When Rotary exchange students come to town, he enjoys taking them to different places. During Rotary meetings, he collects hospitality and often delivers speeches on topics of interest. Wickstrom is particularly passionate about improving the economy and protecting the environment.

In addition to being an active Rotarian, Wickstrom serves on the HOPE Center Board, exercises daily, reads, and volunteers at the Salvation Army.

“I like to be busy, said Wickstrom, 88. “I don’t like to waste time.”

Wickstrom also devotes much of his time to The Virtues Project-Faribault. When he worked in a financial practice with Cindy Diessner, who he calls the nucleus of the project, Wickstrom latched on to the program that recognizes the best in others. He carries with him a pack of Virtues Reflection Cards and retrieves two in particular that relate to his life code — unity and detachment.

“Without unity, nothing gets done,” said Wickstrom.

According to a description on the Virtues Reflection card, through unity “we see our commonality without evaluating our differences.” Detachment, he reads, is “experiencing our feelings without allowing them to control us.”

 

“In this society, we’ve got to find ways to get along with people,” said Wickstrom.

If there’s one thing Wickstrom has learned, it’s that asking questions creates more unity than making statements. Where statements present opportunities to disagree, he said, “you can’t argue with a question.”

Faribault Rotarian Dick Houston, who’s known Wickstrom for at least three decades, describes his friend as extremely bright and quick-witted.

“He’s got a memory for history that’s incredible,” said Houston. “He knows it all by heart.”

Whether it’s American history or his own family history, when Wickstrom remembers stories if the message sticks with him. In particular, he recalls the profound impact a teacher made on his aunt, who in turn inspired her students when she became a teacher herself.

“You never know what’s going to happen as a result of being kind to someone,” said Wickstrom.

 

Reporter Misty Schwab can be reached at 507-744-2551. Follow her on Twitter @APGmisty.

©Copyright 2018 APG Media of Southern Minnesota. All rights reserved.

 
  •  

Service above Self

Reprinted with permission from the Faribault Daily News
 
A Rotaract club sponsored and advised by the Faribault Rotary is taking shape. Pictured from left: SCC Assistant Coordinator Nicole Hamilton, Rotaract Treasurer David Mesta, Rotaract President Piper Nelson, Rotaract Cabinet member Cammi Nordmeyer and Faribault Rotarian Kenneth Johnson. (Misty Schwab/Faribault Daily News)
 

Positive experiences with Rotary clubs have inspired three South Central College students to start their own campus subgroup — a Rotaract.

The program invites individuals between 18 and 30 to develop ways to solve pressing local and global issues. In so doing, members cultivate leadership skills and foster relationships both within and outside the club.

Faribault Rotarian Kenneth Johnson looked for a liaison to start a Rotaract at South Central College when SCC student Piper Nelson stepped up. Johnson visited with Nicole Hamilton, SCC assistant coordinator, and the club fell into place from there.

Nelson studied abroad in Germany through Rotary Youth Exchange— another rotary subgroup. Her ears perked when she heard the word “rotaract,” associating it with the program that made a strong impression on her.

“Before, I had no idea what Rotary was,” said Nelson. “But I talked to someone who had gone [to Germany] the year before and learned more about [Rotary Exchange]. It’s helped me grow as a person.”

Nelson spread the word about Rotaract to SCC students David Mesta and Cammi Nordmeyer, who both expressed interest in joining the club. Mesta serves as treasurer of the group while Nordmeyer is a cabinet member.

Mesta is already a member of STRIVE (Students Taking Renewed Interest in the Value of Education), another Rotary subgroup, and listened to speakers from the Faribault Rotary as part of that program.

When Nordmeyer was in high school, Rotary sponsored a concert and gave scholarships to students. She also attended a camp through Rotary. Recognizing the club’s strong community involvement, Nordmeyer said she likes the idea of Rotaract having “youth cater to youth.”

The Faribault Rotary sponsors and advises the local Rotaract, an otherwise independent group. Rotaract clubs dictate their own projects, manage their own funds, and find their own ways to tackle pressing issues in their communities and the greater world. Compared to Rotary clubs, Johnson said Rotaracts “plan less and implement more” and “work on what they want to without the red tape.”

“They have their finger on the pulse of things we’re oblivious to,” said Johnson of the young adult age group. “We [Rotarians] always have a renewed commitment after meeting with students.”

Hamilton said Rotaract already fulfills the SCC’s requirement for all student organizations to conduct community service projects at least once per year. Once the Rotaract officially starts meeting, Hamilton’s duties include making sure students do everything necessary for funding and handle activities fees properly.

As the next steps in the process, Rotaract members will develop a constitution, recruit more members and reach out to the community to gather ideas for potential service projects.

Nelson said a handful of students already plan to join Rotaract, and she plans to get the word out further by word of mouth and on social media.

SCC student organizations typically hold meetings twice a month, and Rotaract is likely to follow the same trend. Young professionals in the community are welcome to attend these meetings on the SCC campus, but only SCC students can vote and make decisions. If young professionals in the community outside SCC want to form their own Rotaract club, Johnson advises those interested to call Dick Huston at 507-384-2482.

Volunteers!

The Warm Our Community event was well received. At the beginning everyone came in to a waiting area from the cold forming lines to wait for personal shoppers to help in the orderly distribution of the outerwear.  Thank you to all the Rotarians and other volunteers who made this a successful event!

Aquatic Center

Tuesday was an important day for the Faribault Family Aquatic Center.
Members of the Faribault Rotary Club gathered to initiate the center’s next move in helping those in wheelchairs access the pool. The Faribault Rotary Club donated a special type of wheelchair so that disabled children can also enjoy the pool and summer fun.
     “I am excited that the wheelchair will allow more people to experience the fun of the Aquatic Center who were not previously able to participate,” Faribault Rotary President Keith Kramer said in an email.
Rotarian Barton Jackson, also in an email, said that he proposed this idea at a board meeting last fall. The board approved of the idea, and a month later the funding was also approved.
As of now, there doesn’t seem to be any plans to update the pool to accommodate wheelchairs, though it doesn’t seem to be necessary. The pool has a zero-depth entry in which the water gets gradually deeper as a person walks in. Pools without this type of entry have a ramp that allows handicapped swimmers to enter in a similar way.
 
     This new change will come as a blessing to people who live with various disabilities.
Jackson, whose son is disabled, noted the difficulty for families like his in going to places that aren’t handicap accessible, which can make it impossible for disabled youngsters to get the same experience as others. This new pool wheelchair will allow disabled children to have the same or similar experience as those who are able-bodied in enjoying a common childhood pastime.
Additionally, Jackson said that there are limited options for children with disabilities to have fun like other kids, and that having this opportunity makes life a bit easier for children and parents.
 
     Kramer noted that the organization’s motto is Service Above Self, and that Rotary focuses on many community projects such as Red Cross Blood Drive and other charities.
“I hope people will be encouraged by our service above self-way of life and know there are people who care and want to see Faribault and surrounding communities thrive,” Kramer said.
“Rotary does a lot of service projects in the community and this is another one of those that we saw need for handicapped children to enjoy some of the amenities that other children can enjoy, so the club voted to buy a handicapped (pool) wheelchair so that those children who can’t get into the water have an opportunity to do so,” Rotarian Richard Huston said.
Rotary International began in 1905 with Paul Harris and has continued to grow in members and charity work. Much of their charity has focused on polio, which since the Rotary’s start in 1985, polio has declined by 99%.
 
     The Rotary Club is meant for many ages. People who are 18+ are encouraged to join. If someone would like to find more about the Rotarian program, members meet every Wednesday at 12:15 at The Inn at Shattuck-St. Mary’s for a lunch. Kramer encourages people to join.
“Someone should join because we have great people, a great purpose, and we also have fun along the way!” Kramer said.
This year, the Rotary Club’s theme is “Be the Inspiration,” chosen by International President Barry Rassin. The “Be the Inspiration” theme combined with Kramer’s words of encouragement that people join if they want to make a difference in a meaningful way, all in all, sounds like the perfect head start in bringing more recognition and access to everyone.
Reprinted with permission from the Daily News.
Reach Reporter Clare Bender at 507-333-3128 or follow her on Twitter @FDNclare.
© Copyright 2018 APG of Southern Minnesota. All rights reserved.
 

Dick and Troy planting a tree with Jefferson student, Omar Hajii-Mohamed.

Boy plants tree

When Rotary International‘s incoming president challenged each of its members worldwide to plant a tree this year, Faribault’s Rotaryfound some eager helpers to achieve the goal.

On Monday, longtime Faribault Rotary Club member Dick Huston rallied Jefferson Elementary School’s third-graders, getting them to help him plant 93 trees, one for every third-grader in the school.

Environmental degradation and global climate change are serious threats to everyone, said Rotary International President Ian H.S. Riseley. “They are having a disproportionate impact on those who are most vulnerable, those to whom Rotary has the greatest responsibility. Yet environmental issues rarely register on the Rotary agenda,” he said.

“It is my hope that the result of that effort will be far greater than the environmental benefit that those 1.2 million new trees will bring,” Riseley said. “I believe the greater result will be a Rotary that recognizes our responsibility not only to the people on our planet, but to the planet itself.”

Besides helping achieve the Rotary Club’s goal, Huston saw the tree planting as an educational opportunity for the students to learn more about the environment. Huston said his three pillars are “education, conservation and collaboration,” all of which were accounted for in the tree-planting exercise.

Families of some third-graders agreed to take trees home and plant them there, others opted to have their trees planted at the school. The rest of the trees will be taken to Huston’s farm, where they will be planted during a special field trip for third-graders later this school year.

“I’m really excited,” said Huston before presenting to the students Monday morning. “The kids are so enthusiastic and ready to go.”

Huston and Rice County Sheriff and Rotary Club President Troy Dunn represented the Rotary Monday, but Faribault teachers led the educational portion. In a slideshow presentation, teachers asked students “What are trees good for anyway?” showing them information from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources website.

The students also learned about northern red oak, quaking aspen, red maple and honey locust trees, the four types that will be planted by the students this year.

“It’s so great to have the school district and the Rotary come together,” said Huston of the event. “In a nutshell, it’s just fun.”

Watching them grow

Dunn, a Jefferson Elementary alumnus, proudly talked to the kids about his own tree-planting experience.

“When I was in fourth grade, I planted six trees at my house and now they’re taller than the school,” he said, describing to the kids how their efforts Monday will pay off years down the road.

“Hopefully, next year, you can plant even more and you can watch the trees grow every year,” Dunn added.

With trees donated by the Rice County Soil and Water Conservation District, fertilizer from the Faribault Garden Club and tree stakes donated by Faribo Farm and Home, the effort is truly a local one that the students will benefit from for years.

What Huston hopes is that those students will see their efforts come to fruition when they graduate.

After each tree is planted, the students will tag their tree to take ownership of it, said Huston.

“Hopefully, they can take some graduation pictures with them when they are done,” Huston said.

 

Reach Reporter Gunnar Olson at 507-333-3128 or follow him on Twitter @fdnGunnar.

©Copyright 2018 APG Media of Southern Minnesota. All rights reserved.

 
 
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Upcoming Events
 
Speakers
Jason Engbrecht
Sep 25, 2019 12:00 PM
Faribault Falcon Robotics
Cassie Onstad
Oct 02, 2019 12:00 PM
Faribault Adult Education - EL, GED, and Adult Diploma
Joe Sage and Jamie Bente
Oct 09, 2019 12:00 PM
9th Grade Academy – Continuing with Success
District Governor
Oct 16, 2019
District Update
Todd Sesker
Oct 23, 2019 12:00 PM
7 period day operating levy
Shattuck-St. Marys Students
Oct 30, 2019
Musical Performance
Dave Beranek
Nov 06, 2019
Youth Services Update
Jake Langeslag
Nov 13, 2019
Goat Dispatch
Nick Phelps
Nov 20, 2019
University of MN Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center
No Meeting
Nov 27, 2019
Happy Thanksgiving
Dr. Chris Pennell
Dec 04, 2019
University of Minnesota Masonic Cancer Research Center
Olivia Sage and Anne Marie Leland
Dec 11, 2019 12:00 PM
Early Childhood Education in Faribault
No Meeting
Dec 25, 2019
Merry Christmas
No Meeting
Jan 01, 2020
Happy New Year