Rotary Club of Faribault

 
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Meeting Responsibilities
Club Services
Attendance/Greeter
Brown, Narren
 
Attendance/Greeter
Sesker, Todd
 
Sergeant At Arms
Johnson, Nort
 
Fellowship
Huston, Dick
 
 
 
 

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Welcome - Join us at our weekly meeting!

Join us at Rotary!

Faribault

Be the Inspiration!

We meet Wednesdays at 12:15 PM
Inn at Shattuck- St. Mary's
1000 Shumway Ave.
Faribault, MN  55021
United States
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Home Page Stories
number 99
Join us Wednesday May 1st for a celebration of our 99th year anniversary (May 1, 1920- May 1, 2019)as a Rotary Club from 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm at The Inn at Shattuck and enjoy a build your own taco bar and some anniversary treats! Family and Friends Welcome! If you are on the meal plan there is no charge otherwise it will be $13.00 per person and kids 10 and under are free! We will have a fun presentation as we kick off our 99th year! Hope to see you there!
Please RSVP  with the online sign up in your email. 

Congratulations!

The Faribault Rotary Club received the District 5960 award as runner up in medium size club category for youth service. Pictured her receiving the award from District Governor, Mike Becker, at the Conference of Clubs last weekend in Rochester was our President-Elect 2019-20, Amy Amundson.
        Saturday May 4th  the Faribault Rotary Club will be doing flooring at the Habitat for Humanity homes located on 30th Street NW. We are looking for about 15 volunteers, 12 for flooring help and 3 for a lunch team. Please indicate your volunteering choice in the online sign up you receive in your email. Flooring crew is from 7:45 to 3:00 and Lunch crew needs to prep food and arrive at the site by 11:45 for a lunch break at 12 noon. Questions contact Laura Bock 507-384-2280 or laura.bock@thrivent.com.
 
       Waiver of Liability and a short safety video can be found at www.habitatricecounty.org click on the volunteer and build schedule, and then click on each link, safety video and release and waiver of liability form. 

David Swan

     David Swan talk to us on the ‘The Gold in Your Soul’ regarding the hidden aspects to youth sports. Mr. Swan played youth sports and went on to play basketball in college while receiving a masters degree in statistics. He spent 6 years coaching basketball in Norway. Mr. Swan asked us to identify some of the reasons to play youth sports. Ideals like: sportsmanship, teamwork, leadership and self-confidence. Mr. Swan uncovered the darker side of youth sports and what seems to matter more to programs than the ideals that we listed as a group.
 
     Mr. Swan expressed that many programs focus much of their time on their best talents, leaving the majority to be left less developed, ultimately leaving the pool of youth talent shallower than other counties. Mr. Swan applied research which express more of a handicap for at least ½ of our youth. Sighting that 32% of all NCAA top 500 tier athletes are born within the first two months of educational year. With only 6% coming from the last two months. With these athletes being identified at the ages of 8,9 or 10, the difference of one year is a very large scope.
       
     While the youth athletic systems in this country are looking for the best talent for their profits, Mr. Swann states we are leaving behind many kids who then lose interest in sports. Mr. Swan expressed a key attribute which sports can teach our youth. What is takes to be a winner, the drive to succeed. This trait is 100% transferable in to the real world of business and successful careers. You can find out more information on this interest subject at Champions Circle website.      www.championscircle.com
In less than 14 months, the Faribault Rotary Club will celebrate its 100-year anniversary on May 1, 2020.  This week’s historical highlight is from 1964.
 
Slides and a tape program were exchanged with the Rotary Club of Wallsend, England.
The slides were later revised for use by the Chamber of Commerce.
The club voted favorable consideration of the Area Vocational School.
Transportation was provided by club members for students from rural areas participating in sports programs.
There was 100% attendance at one meeting.
 
Our 44th club President in 1963-64 was Clarence E. Purdie.

Congratulations!

Last Wednesday, we handed out 4 STRIVE (Student Taking Renewed Interest in the Value of Education) scholarships totaling $9000. Lauren Steinberg & Kevin Tovar each received a $2500 scholarship for the most improved GPA. Brook Flicek & Evelyn Nigon each received a $2000 for illustrating Rotarian values. 
In less than 14 months, the Faribault Rotary Club will celebrate its 100-year anniversary on May 1, 2020.  This week’s historical highlight is from 1963. Please read the Faribault Rotary Youth Camp- Early History story by Layton Hoysler in the next column.
 
Faribault defeats Owatonna in attendance contest.
There was a presentation by Mayor Duncan about the Downtown Mall Plan.
The Youth Camp was dedicated on June 28, 1963. (SEE STORY)
 
Our club’s 43rd president in 1962-63 was Arnold A. Madow.
 

Tom Hubler

     Tom Hubler was the guest speaker April 3rd 2019. Tom wrote the book The Soul of the Family Business and runs a Twin Cities based company called Hubler for Business Families which is directed to helping family owned business create focus and reenergize their businesses.
     The Soul of Family Business covers topics such as the development of a shared vision for the family and for the business, creating individual and organizational strategies to ensure a personally and financially rewarding business, and preparation planning to ensure that family values continue to emphasize a positive family culture.
     Tom spoke of the soul and how that translates to the family that works together. He outlined the Ten Characteristics of a soulful Family business and why they are important. They are creating and utilize a common family vision, develop and maintain positive communication and conflict management skills, practice forgiveness, embrace change, regular family meetings, love, create legacy plan, have an active board of directors, have a current family participation plan, practice gratitude, service, and philanthropy. Tom has over 35 years as a family business consultant.
In less than 14 months, the Faribault Rotary Club will celebrate its 100-year anniversary on May 1, 2020.  This week’s historical highlight is from 1962.
 
The annual Dues were increased to $40 per year.
There were small group discussions on financing the Youth Camp.
The club toured the new Faribault Senior High School.
The club had the first scholarship Luncheon for honor students.
There was a tour of the St. Lucas Convalescent Home.
A meeting was held at the new shelter at the Youth Camp.
 
Our club’s 42nd president in 1961-62 was Dr. Donald J. Studer.

Strive 

     I am delighted to share with all of you that our Strive Banquet was an overall success!  We did have a few hiccups, but when you consider what a large event this is, that is to be expected.  We planned for about 50 people in attendance and I think we met that total.  Due to the banquet falling on the last day of spring break (which I take full responsibility for; I failed to look at the school calendar when rescheduling),  we were a little light on student turn-out.  The Inn at Shattuck provided us with an amazing venue, delicious food (with exquisite dessert trays) and incredibly helpful staff. 
 
     Thank you to Troy Dunn for taking attendance.  Pastor Greg and his wife Diane made excellent hosts; in addition Greg led us in prayer and song. Thank you.  Carmen was amazing in taking care of a lot of the behind the scenes preparation, including sending out invites, tallying RSVPs, and taking care of the programs.  I really appreciate that Carmen! Keith Kluzak did a wonderful job, as always, with taking care of the scholarship portion of the program.  I know you put a lot of time into that, Keith, and I am so grateful!  Finally, President Keith Kramer did an outstanding job in providing our guests with an overview of Rotary and leading us in the customs that we follow at the beginning of every meeting.
 
     Thank you all for your support of Strive in whatever role you play. This program would not be successful if it were not for you!
 
Kurt Halverson
In less than 15 months, the Faribault Rotary Club will celebrate its 100-year anniversary on May 1, 2020.  This week’s historical highlight is from 1961.
 
This was the year of the first “Million Dollar Meal” for the Rotary Foundation.
 
There was a program on Direct Dialing for the new telephones.
 
There was a progress report on the Interstate Highway 35.
 
Our club’s 41st president in 1960-61 was Melville E. Krafve.
 

New Club at South Central College

     The Faribault Rotaract Club recently received their charter at a Faribault Rotary Club meeting. The club is comprised of 28 students from South Central College and is open to all young adults who wish to provide service to the community. One of the group's service projects is to volunteer at Believet Canine Service Partners, which trains service dogs for veterans.
     The Rotaracts will host dogs in their homes on weekends, as well as feed, groom, walk and perform other care tasks. In addition, the group is working on creating a volunteer program at St. Lucas Care Center. For more information about the club, visit rotary5960.org/clubInfo/scc-rotaract.

Reprinted with permission from the Faribault Daily News

 

To some, he's a dedicated veterinarian. To some, a world traveler. To some, a proud Rotarian.

To all, he's Richard "Dick" Huston. There's no one way to define a man who's traveled to all seven continents, who's helped settle lawsuits dealing with cattle or who's been on the Minnesota Timberwolves' private plane.

Somehow the 1,000-piece puzzle comes together to create a mosaic of a man who won't let life come to him. Click on the "Read More" link below for the rest of the article.

 

Welcome Chad!

Chad gave his classification talk recently.  I asked him six follow up questions to help summarize his presentation for those of us who were present and for our club members who missed the meeting. If you have not had a chance to welcome him to our club, please do so.
  1. Your Family members, occupations (including you) or school level?” 
Chad Hjellming, Regional Publisher of APG of Southern Minnesota
Stephanie Hjellming, Special Education teacher at Cannon Falls Schools
Hannah Hjellming, freshman in high school
Ryan Hjellming, 5th grade student
  1. Your Hometown/School/College
Hometown: Caledonia
College: Viterbo College and Winona State University
  1. Your Previous occupations?
Editor, sales manager, sales rep, Publisher
  1. Any Hobbies?
Coaching youth sports, collecting sports memorabilia
  1. Rotary sponsor?
Todd Sesker
  1. Interesting fact about you or your life?
I coach 5 different youth sports teams throughout the year, including basketball, baseball and softball.

Thank you to the Faribault Elks and all Rotarians who volunteered and/or participated in the annual Youth Fishing Contest on French Lake last Saturday.

Welcome Mary!

 
Mary gave her classification talk recently.  I asked her six follow up questions to help summarize her presentation for those of us who were present and for our club members who missed the meeting. If you have not had a chance to welcome her to our club, please do so.
 
  1.   Your Family members, occupations (including you) or school level?” 
 
Mary Reese Account executive KOWZ/KRUE RADIO, Dustin Reese Logistics Coordinator Wenger Inc, Harrison Reese Kindergarten St Mary’s elementary, Alexander Reese Daycare
  1. Your Hometown/School/College
Riceville, IA
Riceville Community High school
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls IA
Southeast Minnesota State Technical College, Red Wing MN
 
  1. Your Previous occupations?
Store Sales Manager Famous Footwear
 
  1. Any Hobbies?
Running, Reading, Curling, and BBQ competitions
 
  1. Rotary sponsor?
Dr. Dick Huston
 
  1. Interesting fact about you or your life?
Met my husband while learning to curl
While in 4-H, I put together a service project which allowed us to repair stones at a cemetery where a good number of stones had been broken over time.
Both of my sons were born a week after they were due

Midterm Conference

David Metta Piper NelsonT

David Metta and Piper Nelson, students at South Central College, attend the Rotary District 5960 mid-term meeting along with other Faribault Rotarians. Metta and Nelson recently started a Rotaract Club for young adults to serve the community. (Photo courtesy of Richard Huston)

 

Thank you to all our volunteers!

Volunteers are the difference between an empty kettle and one that raises about $30 per hour – enough to provide a family with two bags of groceries, or shelter an individual for a night. Every volunteer makes a difference!
The Faribault Rotary Club has placed a second "Little Free Library" at Our Savior's Lutheran Church to provide greater variety and meet a growing usage.  The "Little Free Library" program was begun by Rotarian Todd Bol of Hudson, WI in 2009.  He made the first one out of an old door in the shape of a school house to honor his mother who had been a school teacher. He put it in his front yard with his mother's books.  Since then 75,000 Little Libraries have been placed in all 50 states and 88 countries.  Improving basic education and literacy is one of Rotary International's area of focus.  Todd Bol died on October 18th from cancer at the age of 62.

Image result for red cross blood

This year's Rotary Red Cross Blood Drive was a great success. Thank you to our volunteers- 
Chuck, Troy, Dick, Kymn, Sarah, Erica, Peter, Brian, President Keith, Brenda, and Laura.
Twas a few weeks before Christmas, when all through downtown,
Not a Rotarian was stirring, no one to be found;
 
The invites were made by Donn Johnson with care,
In hopes that everyone would soon be there;
 
The Rotarians were nestled all snug in their beds;
While visions of Christmas concerts danced in their heads;
 
They knew in a moment the time had drawn near,
To sign-up with Donn and tell him no fear;
 
For we will be coming, even bringing a guest;
Looking forward to lunch and the choir's singing best;
 
More rapid than eagles the Faribault Rotarians came,
And Donn whistled and shouted and called them by name:
 
Now, Twitchell! Now, Rojas! Now, Leland and Sanchez!
On, Secraw! On, Jackson! On, Hjellming and Wilson!
 
To the seat of your cars! To the end of the street!
Now dash away! Dash away! And soon we will meet!
 
Then we heard Donn exclaim, as he walked out of sight;
"Happy Christmas to all, and to all a good night!"
 
All Rotarians, their families, and guests are invited to the 79th annual Faribault Rotary Christmas Concert to be held on Wednesday December 19th (11:45 am- 1:15 pm) at Our Savior's Lutheran Church. The joyful sounds of the holiday season will be brought to us by the Faribault High School Choir. Our host for over 30 years, Donn Johnson asks that you use the online sign up via email if you will be coming and bringing one or more guests.  The cost of the meal is $11 unless you are on the meal plan.
     

Youth Exchange

These past few weeks/ last month have been very busy as I have been trying to get more involved with things and become a part of the German community as well as spend a significant amount of time doing things with my host family, friends, school, sports, and the list goes on. 
 
Things have been really exciting in these parts!
 
I have been here in Paderborn for almost 3 months now, and things have been pretty much nonstop. Language learning has taken a lot of my time and I recently began a language course at a local language school which I hope will help me speed up the complicated learning process. Attending the local high school has also brought about a whole new set of adventures. Making friends is still an evolving process, but I like to remember that all good things take time. I have also made numerous friends through Rotary and it's really incredible to get to meet so many new people with such different life experiences and stories. 
 
 Rotary took the exchange students on an amazing tour of Germany, stopping in cities such as Hamburg, Dresden, Munich, Berlin, and numerous others. This was a great opportunity to not only see Germany but also to get closer with the other exchange students. We visited the Berlin Wall, the Hamburg Fish Market, the Sempar Opera in Dresden, and even went to Oktoberfest in Munich. I have attached some photos  (click on the link below) of this trip including a photo of the sunrise over the port in Hamburg as we walked back from the fish market at 6am, a castle in Potsdam, and a photo of the view off the balcony at Schloss Neuschwanstein. 
 
Overall things are very good. At the end of November, I will travel to Iserlohn to another Rotary weekend with the inbounds/exchange students. We will go ice skating, visit the Weinachtsmarkt (Christmas Market), and do other local "wintery" activities.
 
 
Until then!
 
Paige

Faribault Daily News (reprinted with permission)

George Wickstrom

George Wickstrom attended the Faribault Rotary Club’s monthly meeting Nov. 14, not knowing he’d walk away with Rotarian of the Year honors.

“I didn’t realize it was going to happen,” said Wickstrom. “I didn’t think it would ever happen.”

Fellow Rotarians nominated Wickstrom for the award, then the past five Rotarians of the Year and Faribault Rotary President Keith Kramer selected Wickstrom as the winner among other nominees.

 

In his acceptance speech, Wickstrom read two poems he can recite by memory — “The Man in the Glass” by Peter Dale Wimbrow Sr. and “The Touch of the Master’s Hand” by Myra Brooks Welch.

Five of Wickstrom’s adult children, one daughter-in-law, and several friends surprised Wickstrom with their presence at the meeting.

Wickstrom became a Faribault Rotarian July 19, 1974. At the time, he didn’t know much about the club. But in his 44 years of membership, Wickstrom has come to consider Rotary “an outstanding organization.”

Through Rotary, Wickstrom reads to fourth-graders at Jefferson Elementary through the Rotary Readers program. He also helps with Meals on Wheels and helps tidy Cedar Lake for the Rotary Camp held there. When Rotary exchange students come to town, he enjoys taking them to different places. During Rotary meetings, he collects hospitality and often delivers speeches on topics of interest. Wickstrom is particularly passionate about improving the economy and protecting the environment.

In addition to being an active Rotarian, Wickstrom serves on the HOPE Center Board, exercises daily, reads, and volunteers at the Salvation Army.

“I like to be busy, said Wickstrom, 88. “I don’t like to waste time.”

Wickstrom also devotes much of his time to The Virtues Project-Faribault. When he worked in a financial practice with Cindy Diessner, who he calls the nucleus of the project, Wickstrom latched on to the program that recognizes the best in others. He carries with him a pack of Virtues Reflection Cards and retrieves two in particular that relate to his life code — unity and detachment.

“Without unity, nothing gets done,” said Wickstrom.

According to a description on the Virtues Reflection card, through unity “we see our commonality without evaluating our differences.” Detachment, he reads, is “experiencing our feelings without allowing them to control us.”

 

“In this society, we’ve got to find ways to get along with people,” said Wickstrom.

If there’s one thing Wickstrom has learned, it’s that asking questions creates more unity than making statements. Where statements present opportunities to disagree, he said, “you can’t argue with a question.”

Faribault Rotarian Dick Houston, who’s known Wickstrom for at least three decades, describes his friend as extremely bright and quick-witted.

“He’s got a memory for history that’s incredible,” said Houston. “He knows it all by heart.”

Whether it’s American history or his own family history, when Wickstrom remembers stories if the message sticks with him. In particular, he recalls the profound impact a teacher made on his aunt, who in turn inspired her students when she became a teacher herself.

“You never know what’s going to happen as a result of being kind to someone,” said Wickstrom.

 

Reporter Misty Schwab can be reached at 507-744-2551. Follow her on Twitter @APGmisty.

©Copyright 2018 APG Media of Southern Minnesota. All rights reserved.

 
  •  

Service above Self

Reprinted with permission from the Faribault Daily News
 
A Rotaract club sponsored and advised by the Faribault Rotary is taking shape. Pictured from left: SCC Assistant Coordinator Nicole Hamilton, Rotaract Treasurer David Mesta, Rotaract President Piper Nelson, Rotaract Cabinet member Cammi Nordmeyer and Faribault Rotarian Kenneth Johnson. (Misty Schwab/Faribault Daily News)
 

Positive experiences with Rotary clubs have inspired three South Central College students to start their own campus subgroup — a Rotaract.

The program invites individuals between 18 and 30 to develop ways to solve pressing local and global issues. In so doing, members cultivate leadership skills and foster relationships both within and outside the club.

Faribault Rotarian Kenneth Johnson looked for a liaison to start a Rotaract at South Central College when SCC student Piper Nelson stepped up. Johnson visited with Nicole Hamilton, SCC assistant coordinator, and the club fell into place from there.

Nelson studied abroad in Germany through Rotary Youth Exchange— another rotary subgroup. Her ears perked when she heard the word “rotaract,” associating it with the program that made a strong impression on her.

“Before, I had no idea what Rotary was,” said Nelson. “But I talked to someone who had gone [to Germany] the year before and learned more about [Rotary Exchange]. It’s helped me grow as a person.”

Nelson spread the word about Rotaract to SCC students David Mesta and Cammi Nordmeyer, who both expressed interest in joining the club. Mesta serves as treasurer of the group while Nordmeyer is a cabinet member.

Mesta is already a member of STRIVE (Students Taking Renewed Interest in the Value of Education), another Rotary subgroup, and listened to speakers from the Faribault Rotary as part of that program.

When Nordmeyer was in high school, Rotary sponsored a concert and gave scholarships to students. She also attended a camp through Rotary. Recognizing the club’s strong community involvement, Nordmeyer said she likes the idea of Rotaract having “youth cater to youth.”

The Faribault Rotary sponsors and advises the local Rotaract, an otherwise independent group. Rotaract clubs dictate their own projects, manage their own funds, and find their own ways to tackle pressing issues in their communities and the greater world. Compared to Rotary clubs, Johnson said Rotaracts “plan less and implement more” and “work on what they want to without the red tape.”

“They have their finger on the pulse of things we’re oblivious to,” said Johnson of the young adult age group. “We [Rotarians] always have a renewed commitment after meeting with students.”

Hamilton said Rotaract already fulfills the SCC’s requirement for all student organizations to conduct community service projects at least once per year. Once the Rotaract officially starts meeting, Hamilton’s duties include making sure students do everything necessary for funding and handle activities fees properly.

As the next steps in the process, Rotaract members will develop a constitution, recruit more members and reach out to the community to gather ideas for potential service projects.

Nelson said a handful of students already plan to join Rotaract, and she plans to get the word out further by word of mouth and on social media.

SCC student organizations typically hold meetings twice a month, and Rotaract is likely to follow the same trend. Young professionals in the community are welcome to attend these meetings on the SCC campus, but only SCC students can vote and make decisions. If young professionals in the community outside SCC want to form their own Rotaract club, Johnson advises those interested to call Dick Huston at 507-384-2482.

Volunteers!

The Warm Our Community event was well received. At the beginning everyone came in to a waiting area from the cold forming lines to wait for personal shoppers to help in the orderly distribution of the outerwear.  Thank you to all the Rotarians and other volunteers who made this a successful event!
A ceremony will be held on Veterans Day to remember the 100th anniversary of the Armistice at 11 am at the Rice County Veterans Memorial in front of the Courthouse.  This year, the Rice County Vets are saluting members of the Sept. 30, 2018 honor flight to Washington D.C. as honored veterans. this includes Rotarian Roger Koopmans (Army) S2 (intelligence) and former Rotarian and past president Dr. Roy Anderson (Army) chief ambulance driver in the 3rd Medical Battalion of the 3rd Infantry Division. 
We are thank you both for your service to our country and to Rotary.

 
The following news story from reporter Misty Schwab appeared in the Faribault Daily News today and is reprinted here with permission.
 
Clarinets.jpg
Faribault High School performing arts students started their academic year preparing for the 53th annual Rotary Scholarship Concert — an event that supports their music endeavors while entertaining an audience.
This year’s Rotary Scholarship Concert is 7 p.m. Saturday in Nomeland Gym.
 
The funds received for ticket sales go into the Rotary Youth Services Program, which is a large pool of money the Faribault Rotary Club donates to youth service clubs they sponsor. The funds benefit children in elementary school as well as students entering college, whether the activity is related to music, athletics, art or general scholarships.
 
The Faribault Rotary Club began awarding scholarships to performing art students at FHS over 50 years ago. Last spring, the Faribault Rotary Club gave six $200 scholarships and one $400 scholarship to selected students.
“The directors at the high school decide who the recipients are,” said Jonah Heinen, FHS choir director. “They pay for private lessons, attend summer camps, and also pay for new and personal instruments. The main objective is to contribute to their art-making. We’ve given [scholarships] to students in our programs who might need a little financial assistance to get started on lessons, and we’ve also given them to younger students like sophomores and juniors as they grow.”
 
Music directors must approve of the way their students intend to use their scholarship money before a Rotarian writes the check.
Choir students Samuel Temple and Naya Anter received the scholarship in last spring, as did band students Hunter Williamette and Abby Stroup. Madison Klecker and Crystal Martinez, violinists in the FHS Philharmonic Orchestra, also received scholarships. Ishmael Macias, the one Faribault High School representative at the All-State Choir Camp this year, earned the only $400 scholarship for his involvement in more than one music elective.
“I already used [my scholarship],” said Williamette, holding up a new trumpet.
 
Williamette, a junior, said band has connected him with other people. Whether he’s playing in the high school band or the community band, he values the social aspect of music.
Stroup, who plays the clarinet in the FHS wind ensemble as well as the community band, used her scholarship to pay for private lessons.
“Band is my favorite class, and Timmer is my favorite teacher,” said Stroup, a senior. “I want to teach in general and hopefully continue with music after high school.”
 
Joe Timmer, FHS band director, began preparing the wind ensemble in September for the concert. All three pieces are dances of European origin –“Consuelo Ciscar,” “Albanian Dance,” and “Courtly Airs and Dances.”
Michael Sloane, who began directing the FHS Philharmonic Orchestra this fall, also follows the dance theme with a Mozart opera called “Lucio Silla” and a Halloween selection titled “Waltz of the Wicked.”
While none of the scholarship students perform as individuals during the Rotary Scholarship Concert, whatever skills they’ve acquired with their award money is expected to benefit their performance in a group.
“Anytime you can improve one way or another how you perform and then bring that back to the group you are a part of, it has to be a positive,” said Faribault Rotarian Donn Johnson. “That’s what we’re trying to provide with these scholarships.”
 
Reporter Misty Schwab can be reached at 507-744-2551. Follow her on Twitter @APGmisty.
©Copyright 2018 APG Media of Southern Minnesota. All rights reserved.
 

Volunteers needed!


After the recent storms swept through the area, our Rotary Camp on Cedar Lake had several large trees and branches fall over the entry road, on the building and the path leading to the lake. This Saturday, we need volunteers to help with the clean-up.  A sign-up sheet will be passed around at our meeting tomorrow.  We need chainsaws, handsaws, branch snips, rakes, and possibly a small tractor. Please contact Dave Beranek with any questions. 

Aquatic Center

Tuesday was an important day for the Faribault Family Aquatic Center.
Members of the Faribault Rotary Club gathered to initiate the center’s next move in helping those in wheelchairs access the pool. The Faribault Rotary Club donated a special type of wheelchair so that disabled children can also enjoy the pool and summer fun.
     “I am excited that the wheelchair will allow more people to experience the fun of the Aquatic Center who were not previously able to participate,” Faribault Rotary President Keith Kramer said in an email.
Rotarian Barton Jackson, also in an email, said that he proposed this idea at a board meeting last fall. The board approved of the idea, and a month later the funding was also approved.
As of now, there doesn’t seem to be any plans to update the pool to accommodate wheelchairs, though it doesn’t seem to be necessary. The pool has a zero-depth entry in which the water gets gradually deeper as a person walks in. Pools without this type of entry have a ramp that allows handicapped swimmers to enter in a similar way.
 
     This new change will come as a blessing to people who live with various disabilities.
Jackson, whose son is disabled, noted the difficulty for families like his in going to places that aren’t handicap accessible, which can make it impossible for disabled youngsters to get the same experience as others. This new pool wheelchair will allow disabled children to have the same or similar experience as those who are able-bodied in enjoying a common childhood pastime.
Additionally, Jackson said that there are limited options for children with disabilities to have fun like other kids, and that having this opportunity makes life a bit easier for children and parents.
 
     Kramer noted that the organization’s motto is Service Above Self, and that Rotary focuses on many community projects such as Red Cross Blood Drive and other charities.
“I hope people will be encouraged by our service above self-way of life and know there are people who care and want to see Faribault and surrounding communities thrive,” Kramer said.
“Rotary does a lot of service projects in the community and this is another one of those that we saw need for handicapped children to enjoy some of the amenities that other children can enjoy, so the club voted to buy a handicapped (pool) wheelchair so that those children who can’t get into the water have an opportunity to do so,” Rotarian Richard Huston said.
Rotary International began in 1905 with Paul Harris and has continued to grow in members and charity work. Much of their charity has focused on polio, which since the Rotary’s start in 1985, polio has declined by 99%.
 
     The Rotary Club is meant for many ages. People who are 18+ are encouraged to join. If someone would like to find more about the Rotarian program, members meet every Wednesday at 12:15 at The Inn at Shattuck-St. Mary’s for a lunch. Kramer encourages people to join.
“Someone should join because we have great people, a great purpose, and we also have fun along the way!” Kramer said.
This year, the Rotary Club’s theme is “Be the Inspiration,” chosen by International President Barry Rassin. The “Be the Inspiration” theme combined with Kramer’s words of encouragement that people join if they want to make a difference in a meaningful way, all in all, sounds like the perfect head start in bringing more recognition and access to everyone.
Reprinted with permission from the Daily News.
Reach Reporter Clare Bender at 507-333-3128 or follow her on Twitter @FDNclare.
© Copyright 2018 APG of Southern Minnesota. All rights reserved.
 

Dick and Troy planting a tree with Jefferson student, Omar Hajii-Mohamed.

Boy plants tree

When Rotary International‘s incoming president challenged each of its members worldwide to plant a tree this year, Faribault’s Rotaryfound some eager helpers to achieve the goal.

On Monday, longtime Faribault Rotary Club member Dick Huston rallied Jefferson Elementary School’s third-graders, getting them to help him plant 93 trees, one for every third-grader in the school.

Environmental degradation and global climate change are serious threats to everyone, said Rotary International President Ian H.S. Riseley. “They are having a disproportionate impact on those who are most vulnerable, those to whom Rotary has the greatest responsibility. Yet environmental issues rarely register on the Rotary agenda,” he said.

“It is my hope that the result of that effort will be far greater than the environmental benefit that those 1.2 million new trees will bring,” Riseley said. “I believe the greater result will be a Rotary that recognizes our responsibility not only to the people on our planet, but to the planet itself.”

Besides helping achieve the Rotary Club’s goal, Huston saw the tree planting as an educational opportunity for the students to learn more about the environment. Huston said his three pillars are “education, conservation and collaboration,” all of which were accounted for in the tree-planting exercise.

Families of some third-graders agreed to take trees home and plant them there, others opted to have their trees planted at the school. The rest of the trees will be taken to Huston’s farm, where they will be planted during a special field trip for third-graders later this school year.

“I’m really excited,” said Huston before presenting to the students Monday morning. “The kids are so enthusiastic and ready to go.”

Huston and Rice County Sheriff and Rotary Club President Troy Dunn represented the Rotary Monday, but Faribault teachers led the educational portion. In a slideshow presentation, teachers asked students “What are trees good for anyway?” showing them information from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources website.

The students also learned about northern red oak, quaking aspen, red maple and honey locust trees, the four types that will be planted by the students this year.

“It’s so great to have the school district and the Rotary come together,” said Huston of the event. “In a nutshell, it’s just fun.”

Watching them grow

Dunn, a Jefferson Elementary alumnus, proudly talked to the kids about his own tree-planting experience.

“When I was in fourth grade, I planted six trees at my house and now they’re taller than the school,” he said, describing to the kids how their efforts Monday will pay off years down the road.

“Hopefully, next year, you can plant even more and you can watch the trees grow every year,” Dunn added.

With trees donated by the Rice County Soil and Water Conservation District, fertilizer from the Faribault Garden Club and tree stakes donated by Faribo Farm and Home, the effort is truly a local one that the students will benefit from for years.

What Huston hopes is that those students will see their efforts come to fruition when they graduate.

After each tree is planted, the students will tag their tree to take ownership of it, said Huston.

“Hopefully, they can take some graduation pictures with them when they are done,” Huston said.

 

Reach Reporter Gunnar Olson at 507-333-3128 or follow him on Twitter @fdnGunnar.

©Copyright 2018 APG Media of Southern Minnesota. All rights reserved.

 
 
 Club President,Troy Dunn and the honorable Rod Mahler with his award and District Governor, Kyle Haugen
      
The Faribault Rotary Club was established 98 years ago on May 1, 1920 as Rotary's 596th club with 22 charter members and by the end of the first-year membership had reached a total of 35. Those early founders of our club established a tradition of record keeping that has now been passed on to me in the form of 6 boxes of records dating back to the first days of our club. My research into Rod’s time in our club revealed the following:
On March 5th, Rod Mahler has been a member for 60 of the 98 years our club has existed. He joined our club on March 5, 1958 at the age of 24. 
 
On that day Al Burkhartzmeyer did his classification talk.
Rod’s classification talk was on June 7th and his review in the bulletin the next week was as follows:
‘Rod Mahler need not take the back seat when it comes to public speaking. I wonder did the box have a ‘Green Door’ on it?  You did a fine job, and we all enjoyed your classification talk very much”
 
Rod missed 2 weeks in August of that first year with the mumps and then had 10 years of perfect attendance. I estimate that he has attended over 2700 meetings with over 90% attendance and over 3000 total Rotary events of which he would be happy to discuss any one of them with you.
 
Notable program speakers his first year were
  • U of M Hockey coach, John Mariucci
  • Congressman and future Governor Al Quie
  • Captain EM Morgan US Navy Pacific Fleet Naval Defenses
  • Mayor P. Kenneth Peterson- about the new Freeway coming
Rod’s 60 years so far give him the longest membership in our club history.
Other notable long-time members
- Palmer Dragsten 1948- 2006 / 58 years
- Al Burkhartzmeyer 1957-2012 / 55 years
- Tom Gerbig 1969- present / 49 years
- George Wickstrom 1974- present / 44 years
- Nuba Pletcher 1921-1965 /44 years (2nd picture)
-Dr. Donald Chathum 1921-1963 /42 years
 
Rod has those connections back to the first year of our club when the original 35 first year members were added during 1920-21. Nuba Pletcher and Dr. Donald Chathum who joined that first year were still members for 5-7 years after Rod joined in 1958.
 
When I joined 25 years ago, Rod was one of the first Rotarians to welcome me to the club fleecing me during fellowship just to be sure that I felt welcome.  He has always been welcoming and encouraging to new members over the years and is a true example of a Rotarian who puts service above self.
 
 He has served this club and Faribault continuously during his 60-year membership even most recently with the donation of our new American flag and sponsoring the membership of our new chamber President, Nort Johnson.
 
Thank you, Rod for your continued inspiration and  service to our club!
 

The need to read!

Little libraries like the one outside the home of Judy Carver at 28 State Ave., across the street from the Allina Clinic, have attracted readers since July 2016. Richard Huston, who adopted the idea of the Faribault Rotary Club’s international outreach program, said he’s please with the circulation the libraries maintain. Carver is the librarian at Lincoln Elementary. When she saw that Rotary was placing the Little Libraries she wanted to become involved and maintain this one. Pictured putting a book in the library is Judy Carver’s granddaughter, Evie Isaacson. (Daily News file photo)Little Library

They look like birdhouses, or maybe mailboxes, but the blue and yellow structures scattered throughout town are actually little libraries the Faribault Rotary Club installed over a year ago. The 2016 international outreach project has served the local community and promoted literacy ever since.

“Literacy was one of the big efforts of our president (Richard Huston) a couple years ago,” said Dick Cook, chair of Faribault Rotary’s International Services Committee. “We took [the little libraries] on because of the demographic in Faribault and the diversity at the schools.”

I’m really big on education, and I think that if you learn to read you can accomplish anything,” said Huston.

Cook and Huston both built the little libraries, which they distributed throughout the community in 2016. Cook said eight or nine of them are now installed outside schools, churches, businesses and private residences throughout Faribault. However, Cook said not all little libraries in town are part of the Faribault Rotary program; some homeowners set them up before the Rotary Club adopted the project.

Seeing little libraries set up in the Twin Cities inspired Huston’s idea to adopt the program in Faribault as the Rotary International’s outreach program in 2016.

“I went to the Twin Cities and photographed eight to 10 I saw there, and they weren’t all the same, so I created my own ideas and dimensions based on what I saw,” said Houston.

Little libraries painted yellow and blue signify their connection with the Rotary, but Huston said he’s painted flowers and other decorations on the house-like boxes. Maggie Chen, an exchange student from Taiwan who Huston and his wife hosted at the time of the project’s conception, painted the one outside Our Savior’s Lutheran Church.

The installation of the little library outside Our Savior’s Church kicked off the Faribault Rotary’s project in July 2016. Cook said that installation inspired a couple requests from Faribault residents to monitor little libraries on their own properties. The Rotary approved those requests after evaluating the suggested locations.

Any resident with a little library installed on his or her property is responsible for monitoring and maintaining the library, and volunteers monitor little libraries outside churches, schools and businesses. However, Cook said patrons generally follow the concept of taking a book and leaving another without much guidance.

Huston monitors the little library at Our Savior’s Church, where he attends services. He tends to add children’s books to the selection while others give away books for adults. If possible, he tries to collect books pertaining to the season. On the rare occasion when the little library needs more books, he informs the congregation of the need.

“There’s a pretty good turnover,” said Huston. “People are not only taking books, but putting books in there. I see quite a bit of variety.”

Jefferson and Lincoln Elementary Schools have taken on little libraries. Cook and Huston both noted ones located outside Congregational Church, kitty-corner from the former Divine Mercy Church building, and at the State Avenue home of Lincoln Elementary librarian Judy Carver.

“If people want them, I would certainly make sure we got it done,” said Huston. “I would build it or someone else would build it.”

After a couple years in the works, Huston said the little libraries still attract patrons and maintain circulation.

“It’s pretty interesting and gratifying to see people are using them to the extent they are,” said Huston.

 

Reporter Misty Schwab can be reached at 507-744-2551. Follow her on Twitter @APGmisty.

©Copyright 2017 APG Media of Southern Minnesota. All rights reserved.

 
Buddy Bench

In order to place eight Buddy Benches at Faribault’s seven elementary schools, the Faribault Rotary worked to raise $10,000. But now that the benches are in place, the real work of educating teachers and students has begun.

The eight benches were installed across the Faribault area from Lincoln Elementary to Nerstrand Elementary in October in an effort to encourage inclusiveness among area kids. Two benches were installed at Jefferson Elementary, which has two playgrounds.

The idea of a Buddy Bench is to provide kids a visible place to sit at their playground if they are feeling alone, sad or left out while other students are at play. The goal of the bench is to attract those kids to the bench and to who’s sitting there so they can include that child.

While the aim of the bench seems simple, the Rotary members who embarked on the mission to put Buddy Benches at each school are working to make sure the benches aren’t just benches.

“Number one, it’s not just a bench,” said Jake Cook, the former Rotary president who made Buddy Benches his presidential project. “It’s to help students engage other students that aren’t feeling involved that day or are having a bad day.”

While he has not seen the benches in action yet, Cook said his children, who attend Nerstrand Elementary, have seen it work, and included kids who are sitting on the bench and taken a seat there themselves during a bad day.

“It’s great to see the finished project and hear stories from teachers and staff and my own children who have used them,” Cook said. “From my understanding, the benches are doing what I’d hoped they’d accomplish.”

The work continues

Last year, when the Buddy Bench project was being concocted, Cook teamed up with Kelly Velander, another Rotary member, who he credits with actually bringing the idea to Faribault after seeing a news report about them working in other communities.

Each year, the Rotary Club president devotes their term to a project like a downtown mural or the Security State Bank clock restoration. Last year, Cook took on Buddy Benches, raising the $10,000 and working with each of the elementary schools to implement them.

Up until the benches were unveiled in October, Cook and Velander took their efforts inside each of the seven schools, working with educators and the students themselves to maximize the effect of the benches on playgrounds.

“We actually had a meeting with staff members from each of the schools,” Cook said. “We wanted to maintain continuity among staff members, so we provided them with PowerPoints and materials developed by Kelly Velander.”

After those meetings, which took place in the first few weeks of the school year, Cook and Velander then asked the teachers to find time to talk with their students about how the Buddy Bench works.

After the conversations took place, Velander said the education appears “seamless,” among the faculty, staff and students across Faribault.

“Staff are saying that students are out there using it and students are dropping everything to go help students on the bench,” Velander said.

One of the educators who participated in the training was Jim Huberty, a behavior interventionist at Jefferson Elementary School. Huberty has noticed students using the benches at Jefferson and appreciated the training he received, pointing specifically to a video emphasizing the importance of using the bench to build longterm relationships.

Most important to Huberty, however, is the impact the benches could have within the walls of Jefferson Elementary.

“The need to fit in and that need to have social interaction is huge and I’m sure that it does transfer over into the academics,” he said. “If a kid is emotionally ready to be with a group of people, they are more ready to learn.”

In the training, teachers and students are taught that the bench should not be a place to sit and socialize, but rather, to promote socialization on the playground. Also, Cook emphasized that a student seated on the bench should play with the first person that offers, and not pick and choose the friends that ask them to play.

“I am proud that we have this in Faribault and I think we have had great support from the community on getting it going,” she said. “Being accepted by peers is a huge issue for students, so I’m hoping that this creates an empathetic group of people growing up in Faribault.”

Reach Reporter Gunnar Olson at 507-333-3128 or follow him on Twitter @fdnGunnar.

Passport map
 

Students reflect on cultures, insights from studying abroad

     Three students who went abroad during high school for different lengths of time, at different times in the year and for different reasons.       Some studied for an entire school year, others visited for just a month, but through their adventures, they agreed that they missed some parts of home, but also made unforgettable memories and friendships.
Run through Northstar Youth Exchange, students 15 to 19 can participate in an exchange. The Faribault Rotary Club is accepting applications for interested students through Oct. 7. If interested, contact Lisa Humfeld-Wilson at 507-330-0108 to learn more. Applications can be submitted through www.northstaryouthexchange.com.
From the salty Mediterranean Sea to Southeast Asia, these three Faribault students shared their experiences of living and learning a long way from Faribault.
Teresa Wilder – Poland
Wilder is currently a sophomore at University of St. Thomas. She studied abroad in 2015/2016, her senior year in High School, on the Baltic Coast of Poland in a city called Sopot.
What did you study?
I mostly studied Polish. I attended a Polish school. When I arrived, I didn’t know much, so I couldn’t keep up with the subjects, so I went to Polish lessons. While everyone else was studying geography, I was studying Polish. The first word I learned was “squared” which I picked up from math class.
What was the highlight of your trip?
I loved my host family. I stayed with the same family for nine months, which is unusual. They were a couple in their early 60s and they were the sweetest couple ever. They had a daughter on exchange that year, so they understood what I was going through. They taught me a lot of Polish as well because the dad did not speak any English.
What will you miss most about Poland?
I miss the language a lot. I fell in love with it because it’s very, very complicated, but it always follows the rules. If you know the rules, you know the language, unlike English where if you know the rules you don’t know anything.
What did you miss most about home while you were gone?
My siblings. I’m very close with them, so I had some issues with home sickness early on. It was rough for me the first month, but I made a really close friend and she loved speaking English with me.
What was your biggest takeaway from the experience?
I definitely learned that you should try everything … within reason of course. Even things that scare you. Worst comes to worst, you won’t like it, but you might learn something new or have a blast.
 

Thank you, Rod!

Rod Mahler presents our Faribault Rotary Club president, Troy Dunn with a new U.S. flag to replace the one that was present for 45 years and first saw use during Rod's year as club president in 1972-73.

 
The dedication ceremony for Faribault's newest mural was held last Saturday.  The project was spear headed by past president, Dick Huston, who made a short presentation to Rotarians and guests in the lot next to the Chavis building.   Jeremy Chavis was also present and spoke briefly to crowd stating he was honored to display the mural on his building. Pictured below are the Rotarians who attended the dedication.

Stocking It Up

(Reprinted with permission from the Faribault Daily News)

There are few things better than books to put in the hands of youth.

Rotary Club of Faribault, United Way and UNITY students from Faribault High School are doing just that. With the installation Wednesday afternoon at Our Savior’s Luterhan Church of the group's first “little library” (though not the first in town).

“We’re hoping to put five or six of them up in the community in areas where there is a lot of diversity,” Rotary member Dick Huston said. “The hope is to increase reading, which translates to a better education.”

Huston built the library himself, and Taiwanese exchange student Maggie Chen, who lives in Huston’s home, painted it. It’s essentially a large mailbox with a small wooden house at the top of a wood post. On one side, there is a door with a glass window, so anyone can see the books inside.

Many of those books are donated by community members to Rotary, and many come from United Way. The latter organization’s executive director, Adam Von Ruden, was on hand for the installation.

“For us, this project really falls in line with what we do in the community and advocate for,” he said.

Faribault United Way currently runs its own book program, the Dolly Parton Imagination Library, which supplies signed up children with a new book, once a month, from birth to 5 years old. The program is currently at capacity with 875 kids.

Von Ruden notes that in the age of iPads in school and smartphones everywhere else, getting a book in a kid’s hand remains an important step.

“It’s just such a benefit to get kids reading,” he said.

Huston expects more little libraries to be built throughout this year. He said they’ll be strategically placed in areas they might be needed.

Children (and adults) are free to take a book inside the library at their own leisure. They’re encouraged to bring it or another book back, but they don’t have to, as Rotary and United Way are standing by to replenish.

Meanwhile, the UNITY students, represented on Wednesday by Rene Villalta (El Salvador), Tufah Abdulahi (Ethiopia) and Sagal Jama (Somalia), will stop by the little libraries weekly to check if they need to be restocked. UNITY is a group at the high school, where students organize events and opportunities for peers from all different cultures to come together and learn more about each other.

Abdulahi noted that the little library project is a good for the students to participate in the club and help youth in the community.

“It’s to help people better understand reading,” she said.

“It’s really good for kids,” added Jama.

Villalta noted the little libraries could be even easier to use than the regular library.

“It’s free. There are no due dates. You can take your time,” he said in Spanish, translated by his step-mom.

This new project is one of many that Rotary leads in the Faribault community and elsewhere. With clubs in countries all over the world, Huston noted, the Christian organization is made up of more than just Christians, and it aims to help more than just Christians, too.

“In Faribault, there is such a diverse population,” he said. “We have a four-way test: Is it the truth? Is it fair to all concerned? Will it build good will and better friendships? Will it be beneficial to all concerned? This project checks all those boxes.”

The following article is a reprinted from the 75th anniversary booklet of the Faribault Rotary Club in 1995 and covers the early years of our club starting in 1920. Part II will be in next weeks bulletin.
 
Murray Hanson
 
 
FARIBOTARIAN
By: Lyle Schreiber
 
      Woodrow Wilson was president; the 18th Amendment was upheld by the Supreme Court; three Negroes were lynched in Duluth; the Faribault National Guard was sent to Duluth to control the rioting; Fourth Street west of Second Avenue was paved; lots in Southern Heights were selling for a dollar down and a dollar a week; the high school graduating class numbered 93. This was 1920.
 
On Thursday April 29, 1920 E.B. Johnson of Minneapolis, representing the district governor, met with 22 charter members of the Faribault Rotary Club. The charter was dated May 1, 1920. By the end of the first year, the membership had reached 35 and 21 members were added in the second year.
 
The first meetings were held at the episcopal Guild House. Mrs. Anna Kahn was the cook-hostess. Her lunches established a tradition of good food for the club. In 1926, the club moved its meeting place to the ELKS Club with the provision that the price of the lunch would not be more than sixty cents. In 1929, with the completion of the Harvey Hotel (Hotel Faribault) the club moves there for its meetings. Evidently the sixty cent limit still prevailed as, in 1933, the hotel was informed the cost must be reduced to fifty cents or the club would leave. The answer must have been negative, as in 1934 the meeting place was moved to the Blue Bird Inn located on Highway 3, about the present location of Larson Electric, Inc. 
     Mrs. C. N. Crossett and the Inn were famous for fine food. Some Rotarians made a point of arriving at the meetings early for chicken giblets and other appetizers. The club moved back to the hotel and continued to meet there until 1969 when it moved to the Evergreen Knoll. The food was good, but the space was too small, so the Country Club was tried. Again, the space arrangement was not satisfactory and it was decided to move to the Lavender Inn.
The following article is the completes the reprint from our 75th Anniversary booklet. 
 
Murray Hanson
 
 
FARIBOTARIAN
By: Lyle Schreiber
 
Rotarians meet for more than food. Name almost any subject and Rotary has a program or speaker covering it. To name a few:
 
1925 School Problems
1928 The Mind of Youth
1930 Organized Labor
1933 Inflation
1930 The Decline of Morals -- Youth and Adults
1938 Congressman August Andreson stressed the need to curb government spending
1941 Should Faribault have an Airport?
1948 The Taft-Hartley Labor Law
1949 Socialized Medicine in Great Britain
1953 South African Race Problem
1956 Prospects of Atomic Electric Plants in Minnesota
 
Local government officials are frequent speakers to keep Rotarians advised of the problems of local government and their solutions. Owners of new and old Faribault industries are asked to tell of their products. In the last few years, club members visited Sellner Manufacturing Co., Faribault Foods, Mercury Minnesota, the remodeled library, and the Faribault correctional facility.
 
Soon after joining, Rotarians are asked to give a Classification Talk in which they give a short biographical sketch and a description of their occupation. These talks are some of the most interesting programs.
 
Beginning in 1940, selected students from local high schools were invited to be guests of the club at regular weekly meetings. This program has continued to the present. Two students from Faribault Senior High School, Bethlehem Academy or Shattuck-St. Mary's attend for two weeks. At the second meeting the students give a resume of their school activities. 
 
Rotary has a program for sending selected local high school students to a foreign country for a year and, in exchange, serves as a host to students from other countries. The Faribault club has had guests from Australia, Brazil, South Africa, and Ethiopia, and sent students to Greenland, Norway, Spain, Japan and Germany.
 
From its beginning, the Faribault Rotary Club has been interested in youth programs. The club assisted in organizing Boy Scout troops and sponsored a summer picnic for boys for several years. Rotarians furnished transportation to roll students who wanted to take part in athletics. The Rotary camp was built for use by Scouts and other Youth groups.
 
Believing that there should be recognition of those students who are academically superior, the club, in 1962, invited those members of the senior class from the High School and Bethlehem Academy who had a grade point average of 3.5 or better to an Honors Banquet. This recognition has continued and the students parents' are invited to attend.
 
To provide funds for the maintenance of the youth camp and for music scholarships, the Rotary club sponsors the first combined high school orchestra, band and choir concert of the year. At Christmas time, the high school choir performs part of their Christmas concert at a regular dinner meeting. For several years the dinner has been held at Shattuck-St. Mary's refractory and Shumway auditorium. A new fundraiser has been the October Rose sale. In 1994, more than 700 dozen roses were sold.
 
When Rotary was organized February 23, 1905 it was a men's organization. It remained so until 1987 when, by action of the Rotary international, the membership of women was authorized. Janine Sahagian was the first woman to be a member of the Faribault Club. Today there are 1,197,308 Rotarians in 27,173 clubs in 151 countries.
 
With 75 years of service to the community, the Faribault Rotary Club looks forward to growth and service.
 
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Upcoming Events
 
Speakers
Jacob Mussehl
Apr 24, 2019
All Energy Solar
BA Students
May 01, 2019
Respect Retreat
Marina
May 22, 2019
Self
Todd Thompson
May 29, 2019
Gautemala Climate Change Project
Captain Randall Knox
Jun 05, 2019
Civil Air Patrol
Installation
Jun 26, 2019
Installation