Rotary Club of Faribault

 
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Meeting Responsibilities
Club Services
Attendance/Greeter
Murray, Tim
 
Attendance/Greeter
Johnson, Nort
 
Sergeant At Arms
Thiele, Chuck
 
Fellowship
Hanson, Murray
 
 
 
 

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Faribault

Be the Inspiration!

We meet Wednesdays at 12:15 PM
Inn at Shattuck- St. Mary's
1000 Shumway Ave.
Faribault, MN  55021
United States
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Home Page Stories
Just a reminder to all Rotarians to pick up your roses at Bloom Floral next Monday Oct. 22nd between 10 am and 2 pm.  If this time does not work for you, please contact Amy or Brenda.

 
The following news story from reporter Misty Schwab appeared in the Faribault Daily News today and is reprinted here with permission.
 
Clarinets.jpg
Faribault High School performing arts students started their academic year preparing for the 53th annual Rotary Scholarship Concert — an event that supports their music endeavors while entertaining an audience.
This year’s Rotary Scholarship Concert is 7 p.m. Saturday in Nomeland Gym.
 
The funds received for ticket sales go into the Rotary Youth Services Program, which is a large pool of money the Faribault Rotary Club donates to youth service clubs they sponsor. The funds benefit children in elementary school as well as students entering college, whether the activity is related to music, athletics, art or general scholarships.
 
The Faribault Rotary Club began awarding scholarships to performing art students at FHS over 50 years ago. Last spring, the Faribault Rotary Club gave six $200 scholarships and one $400 scholarship to selected students.
“The directors at the high school decide who the recipients are,” said Jonah Heinen, FHS choir director. “They pay for private lessons, attend summer camps, and also pay for new and personal instruments. The main objective is to contribute to their art-making. We’ve given [scholarships] to students in our programs who might need a little financial assistance to get started on lessons, and we’ve also given them to younger students like sophomores and juniors as they grow.”
 
Music directors must approve of the way their students intend to use their scholarship money before a Rotarian writes the check.
Choir students Samuel Temple and Naya Anter received the scholarship in last spring, as did band students Hunter Williamette and Abby Stroup. Madison Klecker and Crystal Martinez, violinists in the FHS Philharmonic Orchestra, also received scholarships. Ishmael Macias, the one Faribault High School representative at the All-State Choir Camp this year, earned the only $400 scholarship for his involvement in more than one music elective.
“I already used [my scholarship],” said Williamette, holding up a new trumpet.
 
Williamette, a junior, said band has connected him with other people. Whether he’s playing in the high school band or the community band, he values the social aspect of music.
Stroup, who plays the clarinet in the FHS wind ensemble as well as the community band, used her scholarship to pay for private lessons.
“Band is my favorite class, and Timmer is my favorite teacher,” said Stroup, a senior. “I want to teach in general and hopefully continue with music after high school.”
 
Joe Timmer, FHS band director, began preparing the wind ensemble in September for the concert. All three pieces are dances of European origin –“Consuelo Ciscar,” “Albanian Dance,” and “Courtly Airs and Dances.”
Michael Sloane, who began directing the FHS Philharmonic Orchestra this fall, also follows the dance theme with a Mozart opera called “Lucio Silla” and a Halloween selection titled “Waltz of the Wicked.”
While none of the scholarship students perform as individuals during the Rotary Scholarship Concert, whatever skills they’ve acquired with their award money is expected to benefit their performance in a group.
“Anytime you can improve one way or another how you perform and then bring that back to the group you are a part of, it has to be a positive,” said Faribault Rotarian Donn Johnson. “That’s what we’re trying to provide with these scholarships.”
 
Reporter Misty Schwab can be reached at 507-744-2551. Follow her on Twitter @APGmisty.
©Copyright 2018 APG Media of Southern Minnesota. All rights reserved.
 

Volunteers needed!

Rotarians are invited to volunteer Saturday morning Nov. 3rd at 8:30 am to help with the distribution of winter clothing. An online sign up has been sent through email to each Rotarian. If you have any questions, please contact our distinguished president, Keith.

Congratulations Erica!

Erica Staab-Absher has joined the Faribault Rotary Club.  Erica is Executive Director of the HOPE Center which advocates against domestic violence.  Pictured with Erica is Rotary president Keith Kramer (left) and Dr. Dick Huston her sponsor.

Investing in our youth!

On Wednesday October 10th we heard from our good friend Becky Ford, director or Faribault Youth Investment (FYI). We hear from Becky about a year ago, and a lot has changed for FYI. The 40 assets campaign for youth was just launching. Members of our community have been recognized as Asset Champions Faribault Rotarian Kurt Halvorson is one of them. Training continues in the community to help adults support kids.
 
A board of Champions has been established to work on strategic planning. They will help with oversight and accountability, direction focus, and sustainability for the future of FYI. Becky filled us in on the goals coming up for the organization: Peruse systems changes, Increase Community Capacity, focusing on out of school support, Youth development best practices, youth services and support, transportation, graduation rates, food security and youth leadership. FYI is an umbrella organization, so this allows them to be a part of all of these different initiatives supporting the youth of our community.
 
How can we act to support this cause? Becky recommends nominating an asset champion, consider joining the board (it's not too late), donate, and the idea she is most excited about, help FYI and Rotary form some sort of club partnership.
 
Thank you for joining us Becky, we love to see your smiling face and hear about everything you and FYI are doing to support the youth of Faribault. We are blessed to have you and the organization.
 
 
In less than 20 months, the Faribault Rotary Club will celebrate its 100-year anniversary on May 1, 2020.  This week’s historical highlight is from 1942-1943.
1942
There were no records available.
Our 22nd club president in 1941-42 was Dr. Donald Chathum.
He was a member from 1921-1963 so Rod knew him.
1943
There was a program that covered reports on war experiences of Walter Rumpf, Dick Peavey, John Boosalis, and A.M. Hanson.
The club heard a report on the Canning Center at Central School.
Our 23rd club President in 1942-43 was Dr. Carl A. Hansen who was still a member in 1970 so Rod knew him also.

Volunteers needed!


After the recent storms swept through the area, our Rotary Camp on Cedar Lake had several large trees and branches fall over the entry road, on the building and the path leading to the lake. This Saturday, we need volunteers to help with the clean-up.  A sign-up sheet will be passed around at our meeting tomorrow.  We need chainsaws, handsaws, branch snips, rakes, and possibly a small tractor. Please contact Dave Beranek with any questions. 

Presidential message

President 2018-19 Barry Rassin

Barry Rassin

President 2018-19

October 2018

Every Thursday morning, I receive an email from the World Health Organization with an update on the status of polio eradication. It contains a wealth of information, country by country: where and how immunization campaigns are being conducted, how many millions of children are being vaccinated, and where environmental surveillance has found evidence of circulating virus. But every week, when that email appears in my inbox, my heart seems to stop for just a moment until I read the first few lines – and learn whether a child was paralyzed by wild poliovirus that week.

That, my friends, is where we are today in the work of polio eradication. The question on my mind as I open that message isn't how many thousands of cases we might see in a year, as we did not too long ago, or even how many hundreds. Instead, when that WHO email arrives every Thursday, the single, binary question it answers is: Was there a new case this week, or wasn't there?

Thirty years ago, 1,000 children were paralyzed by polio every single day. Since then, we've marked our progress, year by year, week by week. We've celebrated as country after country, region after region has been declared polio-free. As we've come closer and closer to our goal, and the number of cases has dropped further and further, the children those numbers reflect have become less and less of an abstraction. When I open that Thursday email, I don't wonder what number I'll see. I wonder, was a child paralyzed this week or not?

We are so close to eradication – but there is so much work left to do.

This month, I ask every Rotary club to help End Polio Now by marking World Polio Day on 24 October. Last year, thousands of Rotary clubs around the world held events to raise awareness and funds for polio eradication. This year, we want to see more World Polio Day events registered than ever. If you have an event planned, be sure to register and promote it at endpolio.org so that more people can take part. If you haven't planned one yet, it's not too late – visit endpolio.org to find ideas, information on this year's livestream, and resources to help your club organize a successful event.

World Polio Day is a tremendous opportunity for clubs to highlight Rotary, and our historic work to eradicate polio, in their own communities. It is also a great way to take advantage of the challenge from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation: For every dollar that Rotary raises for polio eradication, the Gates Foundation will give two more. Join me, and Rotarians everywhere, on 24 October for World Polio Day – and Be the Inspiration for a polio-free world.

Civil Rights- 1970's

     On Wednesday October 3, 2018 we heard from Dr. Barry Schaffer, specifically, about his time with the Alabama Desegregation Center.
 
     Dr. Schaffer is the husband of Faribault Rotarian Anne Marie Leland. His hobbies include coaching and playing softball, visiting the Boundary Waters, Bass Fishing Archery Hunting and Pickle ball. Dr. Schaffer is a Vietnam Vet (thank you for your service) and holds many degrees, a BS in Environmental Science, and MA in Science, an Education Doctorate in Educational Administration. We had a brief civil rights history lesson, then we learned more about desegregation. 
 
Dr. Shaffer’s first professional job was with the Alabama Desegregation Assistance Center in 1972 to 1975.  He was employed by the University South Alabama. When he began his career, there were 8 staff.
The process worked something like this: After black parents in a school district won a civil suit, Judges would order for school board members in the district to resign, or face a $1000.00 a day fine. Dr. Schaffer and company would be sent to the district to basically take over an extended stay motel and go to work, starting first with the reappointment of a new school board, and superintendent. 
 
     The teams focus as on transportation, curriculum, professional development, community relations, school finances, academics and student activities. Barry's roll was in athletics, student government, social events, year books, graduations, etc... Barry conducted a lot of sensitivity and leadership training. He had the opportunity to interview the students an appoint emerging leaders to student government and other leadership rolls. 
 
     Thank you for presenting and explaining to us in detail how this all worked. We look forward to seeing your smiling face again soon! 
 
In less than 20 months, the Faribault Rotary Club will celebrate its 100-year anniversary on May 1, 2020.  This week’s historical highlight is from 1939.
 
There was a program and discussion on “Faribault’s Recreation System.”
 
The decision was made to publish each member’s attendance record for a period of six months.
 
There was a program on the topic “Should Faribault have an airport?”
 
Our 21st club president in 1940-41 was J. Arthur Peterson.

Selling Roses!

Image result for roses
We would like to reach out to everyone regarding the Rose Sale and the procedures to follow for our big fundraiser.  We know that many know how the Rose Sale works as we have done it the same every year, but have realized that we many new Rotarians that very likely are confused by the packet they received if they were not at the meeting when we handed them out.  Roses are again to be sold for $20 a dozen.
In your packet was:
  • a flyer to hang up at your place of employment to entice people to buy roses.
  • a list to track your orders and what they choose, red or grower’s choice.  Growers choice is dozens of roses in different colors that the grower chooses to send for us to give out.
  • thank you receipts to cut a part as some people will ask for one if they pay in cash.
  • Slip to turn in- with your name, how many dozen roses and broken down into how many of Red and how many grower’s choice - you can fill in the amount paid or owes at that time. PLEASE DO NOT HAND IN THE MONEY UNTIL YOU HAVE ALL OF IT COLLECTED.
We are asking this year if every Rotarian will please work hard to sell their 12 dozen roses.  We have 60 Rotarians and if everyone does their part to sell the roses that would be 720 dozen roses – WOW- that would knock it out of the park with our profit for the club being approximately $9,000   - that is huge and we definitely need this fundraiser more than ever.  Many sell many more than expected so please try to do your fair share as a club member.
 
If you struggle with selling roses or just don’t have the time, we are asking each Rotarian to then make a good will donation of $ 150.00 to the club.  We are just asking everyone to participate this year. 
 
Key dates:
Kick off of the Rose sale was September 19th and orders are due on October 10th.  Please give it your best!
Delivery date is set for OCTOBER 22ND and ROSES can be picked up at BLOOM FLORAL AT 408 CENTRAL AVENUE, FARIBAULT MN, BEGINNING AT 10:00 AM.
 
Thank you everyone for your hard work and commitment to this fundraiser for the Faribault Rotary
Any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Brenda at 507-409-1344 or Amy at 507-409-1329.

Congratulations!

 
The Faribault Rotary club honored three members as Paul Harris Fellows.  This recognition is given when a member has donated $1000 to the Paul Harris Foundation.  The monies are used in multiple ways around the world to improve peoples lives.   The International Rotary organization took on the challenge of eliminating polio world wide by vaccinating all children under five.  In 1988 there were 350,000 cases of polio in over 200 countries.  Last year there were 22 cases in two countries.  Pictured left to right are president Keith Kramer, Paul Harris recipients Todd Sesker, Troy Dunn and Dick Huston, Foundation co-chair Brent Peroutka and Rotary District Governor Mike Becker.

Paderborn Germany

Image result for paderborn germany
My First Month in Paderborn:
 
I arrived at the tiniest local airport to two amazing host parents, Holger and Doris, who were waiting with a big sign and eagerly welcomed me to the place that I would call home for the next year. 
 
My host mom Doris had taken off of work for the first week I was here so that she could show me around and help me get accustomed to the surroundings. We visited numerous surrounding villages including her childhood hometown of Lüdge, which is known for its renovated historical looking homes and well-maintained old city wall. We also took a trip to the inner city of Paderborn on the bus line that I would be riding every day for school. It takes almost an hour to get there by bus! Overall the first week was a blur of new experiences and some intense culture shock.
 
School began just one week after I arrived. I have to wake up at 5:30 every morning to make it to school on time... so different than what I'm used to. On the first day one of my host sisters’ friends (my host sister is now in Finland on exchange) came to pick me up so she could make sure I got to school okay. We rode the bus together, and I can honestly say that I've never seen a bus so full of students in my entire life. 
 
It's the fourth week of school now and every day brings new challenges. I have to focus every single second to understand even partially what is going on, and it uses a lot of brain power to constantly think about everything that is being said. Hopefully school will get easier as I start understanding more German. I think I will start a German course soon as it is very difficult to not be able to participate in school and communicate thoroughly with my peers. 
 
I am so excited to see what the rest of this year will bring and I can’t wait to share it with everyone!
 
Until next week,
       Sage Kline  
 

Congratulations!

     The Faribault Rotary club inducted two new members.  Daisy Sanchez is the director of operations of Healthfinders Collaborative and Tim Murray is the administer for the city of Faribault.
 
Pictured are president Keith Kramer, Andy Bohlen (sponsor of) Tim Murray, Daisy Sanchez and her sponsor Dr. Dick Huston.
 
 

Aquatic Center

Tuesday was an important day for the Faribault Family Aquatic Center.
Members of the Faribault Rotary Club gathered to initiate the center’s next move in helping those in wheelchairs access the pool. The Faribault Rotary Club donated a special type of wheelchair so that disabled children can also enjoy the pool and summer fun.
     “I am excited that the wheelchair will allow more people to experience the fun of the Aquatic Center who were not previously able to participate,” Faribault Rotary President Keith Kramer said in an email.
Rotarian Barton Jackson, also in an email, said that he proposed this idea at a board meeting last fall. The board approved of the idea, and a month later the funding was also approved.
As of now, there doesn’t seem to be any plans to update the pool to accommodate wheelchairs, though it doesn’t seem to be necessary. The pool has a zero-depth entry in which the water gets gradually deeper as a person walks in. Pools without this type of entry have a ramp that allows handicapped swimmers to enter in a similar way.
 
     This new change will come as a blessing to people who live with various disabilities.
Jackson, whose son is disabled, noted the difficulty for families like his in going to places that aren’t handicap accessible, which can make it impossible for disabled youngsters to get the same experience as others. This new pool wheelchair will allow disabled children to have the same or similar experience as those who are able-bodied in enjoying a common childhood pastime.
Additionally, Jackson said that there are limited options for children with disabilities to have fun like other kids, and that having this opportunity makes life a bit easier for children and parents.
 
     Kramer noted that the organization’s motto is Service Above Self, and that Rotary focuses on many community projects such as Red Cross Blood Drive and other charities.
“I hope people will be encouraged by our service above self-way of life and know there are people who care and want to see Faribault and surrounding communities thrive,” Kramer said.
“Rotary does a lot of service projects in the community and this is another one of those that we saw need for handicapped children to enjoy some of the amenities that other children can enjoy, so the club voted to buy a handicapped (pool) wheelchair so that those children who can’t get into the water have an opportunity to do so,” Rotarian Richard Huston said.
Rotary International began in 1905 with Paul Harris and has continued to grow in members and charity work. Much of their charity has focused on polio, which since the Rotary’s start in 1985, polio has declined by 99%.
 
     The Rotary Club is meant for many ages. People who are 18+ are encouraged to join. If someone would like to find more about the Rotarian program, members meet every Wednesday at 12:15 at The Inn at Shattuck-St. Mary’s for a lunch. Kramer encourages people to join.
“Someone should join because we have great people, a great purpose, and we also have fun along the way!” Kramer said.
This year, the Rotary Club’s theme is “Be the Inspiration,” chosen by International President Barry Rassin. The “Be the Inspiration” theme combined with Kramer’s words of encouragement that people join if they want to make a difference in a meaningful way, all in all, sounds like the perfect head start in bringing more recognition and access to everyone.
Reprinted with permission from the Daily News.
Reach Reporter Clare Bender at 507-333-3128 or follow her on Twitter @FDNclare.
© Copyright 2018 APG of Southern Minnesota. All rights reserved.
 

Our History!

     As our guests for the installation of Keith, we welcomed the following former Rotary Past Presidents who were introduced by our 60 year member and past president Rod Mahler. 
Pictured from left to right are:
Dr. Roy Anderson our 54th president 1973-74.
          Classification- Optometry
Darlene Meillier our 83rd president 2002-03.
          Classification- Mortgage Lending
Jim Nielson our 70th president 1989-90.
          Classification- Director of Court Services
Rod Mahler our 53rd president 1972-73
          Classification- Hardware- Retail and later- Realtor
Pastor Gordon Orde our 79th president 1998-99.
           Classification- Religion- United Methodist
Wade Karli our 78th president 1997-98
          Classification- Academy for the Blind
Reverend Rick Ormsby our 89th president 2008-09.
          Classification-  Religion- Pastor

Congratulations!

New Rotary presThe Faribault Rotary Club has installed Keith Kramer as it's 99th president for the 2018-19 year.  Keith is the Chief Operating Officer are Harry Brown's auto dealership.  Pictured here are Keith and his wife Amy and three children Carsen 11, Madelyn 9, and Allison 7.
 
Also in attendance were Keith's mother in law Cindy and his employer Mike Brown of Harry Brown's Family Automotive.
 
In the upcoming year, Keith highlighted some of his goals for our club. He is looking at some service projects that get our families involved, maybe doing some service at the Community Cathedral Café, or cleaning up a trail, and being more involved with the Elks ice fishing contest. His goal is 10 new members this year. Our meetings are going to include a short 2-3-minute video about other Rotary projects that are happening around the world, and on days when we don't have a video we will play the fun game "two truths and a lie" it will help us to continue to get to know each other better!
 
The Rotary theme for the year is “Be the Inspiration”, thank you Keith for leading us this year and being an inspiration - and showing us how we can make a difference through Rotary.
 

Dick and Troy planting a tree with Jefferson student, Omar Hajii-Mohamed.

Boy plants tree

When Rotary International‘s incoming president challenged each of its members worldwide to plant a tree this year, Faribault’s Rotaryfound some eager helpers to achieve the goal.

On Monday, longtime Faribault Rotary Club member Dick Huston rallied Jefferson Elementary School’s third-graders, getting them to help him plant 93 trees, one for every third-grader in the school.

Environmental degradation and global climate change are serious threats to everyone, said Rotary International President Ian H.S. Riseley. “They are having a disproportionate impact on those who are most vulnerable, those to whom Rotary has the greatest responsibility. Yet environmental issues rarely register on the Rotary agenda,” he said.

“It is my hope that the result of that effort will be far greater than the environmental benefit that those 1.2 million new trees will bring,” Riseley said. “I believe the greater result will be a Rotary that recognizes our responsibility not only to the people on our planet, but to the planet itself.”

Besides helping achieve the Rotary Club’s goal, Huston saw the tree planting as an educational opportunity for the students to learn more about the environment. Huston said his three pillars are “education, conservation and collaboration,” all of which were accounted for in the tree-planting exercise.

Families of some third-graders agreed to take trees home and plant them there, others opted to have their trees planted at the school. The rest of the trees will be taken to Huston’s farm, where they will be planted during a special field trip for third-graders later this school year.

“I’m really excited,” said Huston before presenting to the students Monday morning. “The kids are so enthusiastic and ready to go.”

Huston and Rice County Sheriff and Rotary Club President Troy Dunn represented the Rotary Monday, but Faribault teachers led the educational portion. In a slideshow presentation, teachers asked students “What are trees good for anyway?” showing them information from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources website.

The students also learned about northern red oak, quaking aspen, red maple and honey locust trees, the four types that will be planted by the students this year.

“It’s so great to have the school district and the Rotary come together,” said Huston of the event. “In a nutshell, it’s just fun.”

Watching them grow

Dunn, a Jefferson Elementary alumnus, proudly talked to the kids about his own tree-planting experience.

“When I was in fourth grade, I planted six trees at my house and now they’re taller than the school,” he said, describing to the kids how their efforts Monday will pay off years down the road.

“Hopefully, next year, you can plant even more and you can watch the trees grow every year,” Dunn added.

With trees donated by the Rice County Soil and Water Conservation District, fertilizer from the Faribault Garden Club and tree stakes donated by Faribo Farm and Home, the effort is truly a local one that the students will benefit from for years.

What Huston hopes is that those students will see their efforts come to fruition when they graduate.

After each tree is planted, the students will tag their tree to take ownership of it, said Huston.

“Hopefully, they can take some graduation pictures with them when they are done,” Huston said.

 

Reach Reporter Gunnar Olson at 507-333-3128 or follow him on Twitter @fdnGunnar.

©Copyright 2018 APG Media of Southern Minnesota. All rights reserved.

 
 
 Club President,Troy Dunn and the honorable Rod Mahler with his award and District Governor, Kyle Haugen
      
The Faribault Rotary Club was established 98 years ago on May 1, 1920 as Rotary's 596th club with 22 charter members and by the end of the first-year membership had reached a total of 35. Those early founders of our club established a tradition of record keeping that has now been passed on to me in the form of 6 boxes of records dating back to the first days of our club. My research into Rod’s time in our club revealed the following:
On March 5th, Rod Mahler has been a member for 60 of the 98 years our club has existed. He joined our club on March 5, 1958 at the age of 24. 
 
On that day Al Burkhartzmeyer did his classification talk.
Rod’s classification talk was on June 7th and his review in the bulletin the next week was as follows:
‘Rod Mahler need not take the back seat when it comes to public speaking. I wonder did the box have a ‘Green Door’ on it?  You did a fine job, and we all enjoyed your classification talk very much”
 
Rod missed 2 weeks in August of that first year with the mumps and then had 10 years of perfect attendance. I estimate that he has attended over 2700 meetings with over 90% attendance and over 3000 total Rotary events of which he would be happy to discuss any one of them with you.
 
Notable program speakers his first year were
  • U of M Hockey coach, John Mariucci
  • Congressman and future Governor Al Quie
  • Captain EM Morgan US Navy Pacific Fleet Naval Defenses
  • Mayor P. Kenneth Peterson- about the new Freeway coming
Rod’s 60 years so far give him the longest membership in our club history.
Other notable long-time members
- Palmer Dragsten 1948- 2006 / 58 years
- Al Burkhartzmeyer 1957-2012 / 55 years
- Tom Gerbig 1969- present / 49 years
- George Wickstrom 1974- present / 44 years
- Nuba Pletcher 1921-1965 /44 years (2nd picture)
-Dr. Donald Chathum 1921-1963 /42 years
 
Rod has those connections back to the first year of our club when the original 35 first year members were added during 1920-21. Nuba Pletcher and Dr. Donald Chathum who joined that first year were still members for 5-7 years after Rod joined in 1958.
 
When I joined 25 years ago, Rod was one of the first Rotarians to welcome me to the club fleecing me during fellowship just to be sure that I felt welcome.  He has always been welcoming and encouraging to new members over the years and is a true example of a Rotarian who puts service above self.
 
 He has served this club and Faribault continuously during his 60-year membership even most recently with the donation of our new American flag and sponsoring the membership of our new chamber President, Nort Johnson.
 
Thank you, Rod for your continued inspiration and  service to our club!
 

The need to read!

Little libraries like the one outside the home of Judy Carver at 28 State Ave., across the street from the Allina Clinic, have attracted readers since July 2016. Richard Huston, who adopted the idea of the Faribault Rotary Club’s international outreach program, said he’s please with the circulation the libraries maintain. Carver is the librarian at Lincoln Elementary. When she saw that Rotary was placing the Little Libraries she wanted to become involved and maintain this one. Pictured putting a book in the library is Judy Carver’s granddaughter, Evie Isaacson. (Daily News file photo)Little Library

They look like birdhouses, or maybe mailboxes, but the blue and yellow structures scattered throughout town are actually little libraries the Faribault Rotary Club installed over a year ago. The 2016 international outreach project has served the local community and promoted literacy ever since.

“Literacy was one of the big efforts of our president (Richard Huston) a couple years ago,” said Dick Cook, chair of Faribault Rotary’s International Services Committee. “We took [the little libraries] on because of the demographic in Faribault and the diversity at the schools.”

I’m really big on education, and I think that if you learn to read you can accomplish anything,” said Huston.

Cook and Huston both built the little libraries, which they distributed throughout the community in 2016. Cook said eight or nine of them are now installed outside schools, churches, businesses and private residences throughout Faribault. However, Cook said not all little libraries in town are part of the Faribault Rotary program; some homeowners set them up before the Rotary Club adopted the project.

Seeing little libraries set up in the Twin Cities inspired Huston’s idea to adopt the program in Faribault as the Rotary International’s outreach program in 2016.

“I went to the Twin Cities and photographed eight to 10 I saw there, and they weren’t all the same, so I created my own ideas and dimensions based on what I saw,” said Houston.

Little libraries painted yellow and blue signify their connection with the Rotary, but Huston said he’s painted flowers and other decorations on the house-like boxes. Maggie Chen, an exchange student from Taiwan who Huston and his wife hosted at the time of the project’s conception, painted the one outside Our Savior’s Lutheran Church.

The installation of the little library outside Our Savior’s Church kicked off the Faribault Rotary’s project in July 2016. Cook said that installation inspired a couple requests from Faribault residents to monitor little libraries on their own properties. The Rotary approved those requests after evaluating the suggested locations.

Any resident with a little library installed on his or her property is responsible for monitoring and maintaining the library, and volunteers monitor little libraries outside churches, schools and businesses. However, Cook said patrons generally follow the concept of taking a book and leaving another without much guidance.

Huston monitors the little library at Our Savior’s Church, where he attends services. He tends to add children’s books to the selection while others give away books for adults. If possible, he tries to collect books pertaining to the season. On the rare occasion when the little library needs more books, he informs the congregation of the need.

“There’s a pretty good turnover,” said Huston. “People are not only taking books, but putting books in there. I see quite a bit of variety.”

Jefferson and Lincoln Elementary Schools have taken on little libraries. Cook and Huston both noted ones located outside Congregational Church, kitty-corner from the former Divine Mercy Church building, and at the State Avenue home of Lincoln Elementary librarian Judy Carver.

“If people want them, I would certainly make sure we got it done,” said Huston. “I would build it or someone else would build it.”

After a couple years in the works, Huston said the little libraries still attract patrons and maintain circulation.

“It’s pretty interesting and gratifying to see people are using them to the extent they are,” said Huston.

 

Reporter Misty Schwab can be reached at 507-744-2551. Follow her on Twitter @APGmisty.

©Copyright 2017 APG Media of Southern Minnesota. All rights reserved.

 
Buddy Bench

In order to place eight Buddy Benches at Faribault’s seven elementary schools, the Faribault Rotary worked to raise $10,000. But now that the benches are in place, the real work of educating teachers and students has begun.

The eight benches were installed across the Faribault area from Lincoln Elementary to Nerstrand Elementary in October in an effort to encourage inclusiveness among area kids. Two benches were installed at Jefferson Elementary, which has two playgrounds.

The idea of a Buddy Bench is to provide kids a visible place to sit at their playground if they are feeling alone, sad or left out while other students are at play. The goal of the bench is to attract those kids to the bench and to who’s sitting there so they can include that child.

While the aim of the bench seems simple, the Rotary members who embarked on the mission to put Buddy Benches at each school are working to make sure the benches aren’t just benches.

“Number one, it’s not just a bench,” said Jake Cook, the former Rotary president who made Buddy Benches his presidential project. “It’s to help students engage other students that aren’t feeling involved that day or are having a bad day.”

While he has not seen the benches in action yet, Cook said his children, who attend Nerstrand Elementary, have seen it work, and included kids who are sitting on the bench and taken a seat there themselves during a bad day.

“It’s great to see the finished project and hear stories from teachers and staff and my own children who have used them,” Cook said. “From my understanding, the benches are doing what I’d hoped they’d accomplish.”

The work continues

Last year, when the Buddy Bench project was being concocted, Cook teamed up with Kelly Velander, another Rotary member, who he credits with actually bringing the idea to Faribault after seeing a news report about them working in other communities.

Each year, the Rotary Club president devotes their term to a project like a downtown mural or the Security State Bank clock restoration. Last year, Cook took on Buddy Benches, raising the $10,000 and working with each of the elementary schools to implement them.

Up until the benches were unveiled in October, Cook and Velander took their efforts inside each of the seven schools, working with educators and the students themselves to maximize the effect of the benches on playgrounds.

“We actually had a meeting with staff members from each of the schools,” Cook said. “We wanted to maintain continuity among staff members, so we provided them with PowerPoints and materials developed by Kelly Velander.”

After those meetings, which took place in the first few weeks of the school year, Cook and Velander then asked the teachers to find time to talk with their students about how the Buddy Bench works.

After the conversations took place, Velander said the education appears “seamless,” among the faculty, staff and students across Faribault.

“Staff are saying that students are out there using it and students are dropping everything to go help students on the bench,” Velander said.

One of the educators who participated in the training was Jim Huberty, a behavior interventionist at Jefferson Elementary School. Huberty has noticed students using the benches at Jefferson and appreciated the training he received, pointing specifically to a video emphasizing the importance of using the bench to build longterm relationships.

Most important to Huberty, however, is the impact the benches could have within the walls of Jefferson Elementary.

“The need to fit in and that need to have social interaction is huge and I’m sure that it does transfer over into the academics,” he said. “If a kid is emotionally ready to be with a group of people, they are more ready to learn.”

In the training, teachers and students are taught that the bench should not be a place to sit and socialize, but rather, to promote socialization on the playground. Also, Cook emphasized that a student seated on the bench should play with the first person that offers, and not pick and choose the friends that ask them to play.

“I am proud that we have this in Faribault and I think we have had great support from the community on getting it going,” she said. “Being accepted by peers is a huge issue for students, so I’m hoping that this creates an empathetic group of people growing up in Faribault.”

Reach Reporter Gunnar Olson at 507-333-3128 or follow him on Twitter @fdnGunnar.

Congratulations Dick Huston!

Dr. Dick Huston has been awarded the 2017 Rotarian of the Year.   Dick joined Rotary Club in 2011 and quickly became a very active member of the club.
Here are just a few of the things that he has accomplished:
*             He is a Past President of Faribault Rotary and current Membership Chair
*             Worked on the Little Libraries project including building some and finding homes throughout the community
*             Involvement in International Projects including a trip to Sierra Leone
*             Involved with the Rotary Exchange program as a host as well as assisting with the host family interviews
*             Participated in the Friendship Exchange and hosted a Friendship Exchange with Rotarians from Taiwan.
*             Paul Harris Society member which means he makes contributions annually to the Rotary Foundation
*             Headed the Rotary Mural project and assisted with the Security Clock project
*             When traveling around the states and world, he attends Rotary meetings
*             In the community, he is active with the South Central College foundation and board, as well as BBBS of Southern MN and the Riverbend Nature Center
*             He promotes and practices conservation of our natural resources
*             Tireless recruiter of new members
*             He occasionally wears a top notch tie!
Dick Huston is an exemplary Rotarian who lives every day by the Rotary Motto "Service above
Passport map
 

Students reflect on cultures, insights from studying abroad

     Three students who went abroad during high school for different lengths of time, at different times in the year and for different reasons.       Some studied for an entire school year, others visited for just a month, but through their adventures, they agreed that they missed some parts of home, but also made unforgettable memories and friendships.
Run through Northstar Youth Exchange, students 15 to 19 can participate in an exchange. The Faribault Rotary Club is accepting applications for interested students through Oct. 7. If interested, contact Lisa Humfeld-Wilson at 507-330-0108 to learn more. Applications can be submitted through www.northstaryouthexchange.com.
From the salty Mediterranean Sea to Southeast Asia, these three Faribault students shared their experiences of living and learning a long way from Faribault.
Teresa Wilder – Poland
Wilder is currently a sophomore at University of St. Thomas. She studied abroad in 2015/2016, her senior year in High School, on the Baltic Coast of Poland in a city called Sopot.
What did you study?
I mostly studied Polish. I attended a Polish school. When I arrived, I didn’t know much, so I couldn’t keep up with the subjects, so I went to Polish lessons. While everyone else was studying geography, I was studying Polish. The first word I learned was “squared” which I picked up from math class.
What was the highlight of your trip?
I loved my host family. I stayed with the same family for nine months, which is unusual. They were a couple in their early 60s and they were the sweetest couple ever. They had a daughter on exchange that year, so they understood what I was going through. They taught me a lot of Polish as well because the dad did not speak any English.
What will you miss most about Poland?
I miss the language a lot. I fell in love with it because it’s very, very complicated, but it always follows the rules. If you know the rules, you know the language, unlike English where if you know the rules you don’t know anything.
What did you miss most about home while you were gone?
My siblings. I’m very close with them, so I had some issues with home sickness early on. It was rough for me the first month, but I made a really close friend and she loved speaking English with me.
What was your biggest takeaway from the experience?
I definitely learned that you should try everything … within reason of course. Even things that scare you. Worst comes to worst, you won’t like it, but you might learn something new or have a blast.
 

Thank you, Rod!

Rod Mahler presents our Faribault Rotary Club president, Troy Dunn with a new U.S. flag to replace the one that was present for 45 years and first saw use during Rod's year as club president in 1972-73.

 
The dedication ceremony for Faribault's newest mural was held last Saturday.  The project was spear headed by past president, Dick Huston, who made a short presentation to Rotarians and guests in the lot next to the Chavis building.   Jeremy Chavis was also present and spoke briefly to crowd stating he was honored to display the mural on his building. Pictured below are the Rotarians who attended the dedication.

Stocking It Up

(Reprinted with permission from the Faribault Daily News)

There are few things better than books to put in the hands of youth.

Rotary Club of Faribault, United Way and UNITY students from Faribault High School are doing just that. With the installation Wednesday afternoon at Our Savior’s Luterhan Church of the group's first “little library” (though not the first in town).

“We’re hoping to put five or six of them up in the community in areas where there is a lot of diversity,” Rotary member Dick Huston said. “The hope is to increase reading, which translates to a better education.”

Huston built the library himself, and Taiwanese exchange student Maggie Chen, who lives in Huston’s home, painted it. It’s essentially a large mailbox with a small wooden house at the top of a wood post. On one side, there is a door with a glass window, so anyone can see the books inside.

Many of those books are donated by community members to Rotary, and many come from United Way. The latter organization’s executive director, Adam Von Ruden, was on hand for the installation.

“For us, this project really falls in line with what we do in the community and advocate for,” he said.

Faribault United Way currently runs its own book program, the Dolly Parton Imagination Library, which supplies signed up children with a new book, once a month, from birth to 5 years old. The program is currently at capacity with 875 kids.

Von Ruden notes that in the age of iPads in school and smartphones everywhere else, getting a book in a kid’s hand remains an important step.

“It’s just such a benefit to get kids reading,” he said.

Huston expects more little libraries to be built throughout this year. He said they’ll be strategically placed in areas they might be needed.

Children (and adults) are free to take a book inside the library at their own leisure. They’re encouraged to bring it or another book back, but they don’t have to, as Rotary and United Way are standing by to replenish.

Meanwhile, the UNITY students, represented on Wednesday by Rene Villalta (El Salvador), Tufah Abdulahi (Ethiopia) and Sagal Jama (Somalia), will stop by the little libraries weekly to check if they need to be restocked. UNITY is a group at the high school, where students organize events and opportunities for peers from all different cultures to come together and learn more about each other.

Abdulahi noted that the little library project is a good for the students to participate in the club and help youth in the community.

“It’s to help people better understand reading,” she said.

“It’s really good for kids,” added Jama.

Villalta noted the little libraries could be even easier to use than the regular library.

“It’s free. There are no due dates. You can take your time,” he said in Spanish, translated by his step-mom.

This new project is one of many that Rotary leads in the Faribault community and elsewhere. With clubs in countries all over the world, Huston noted, the Christian organization is made up of more than just Christians, and it aims to help more than just Christians, too.

“In Faribault, there is such a diverse population,” he said. “We have a four-way test: Is it the truth? Is it fair to all concerned? Will it build good will and better friendships? Will it be beneficial to all concerned? This project checks all those boxes.”

The following article is a reprinted from the 75th anniversary booklet of the Faribault Rotary Club in 1995 and covers the early years of our club starting in 1920. Part II will be in next weeks bulletin.
 
Murray Hanson
 
 
FARIBOTARIAN
By: Lyle Schreiber
 
      Woodrow Wilson was president; the 18th Amendment was upheld by the Supreme Court; three Negroes were lynched in Duluth; the Faribault National Guard was sent to Duluth to control the rioting; Fourth Street west of Second Avenue was paved; lots in Southern Heights were selling for a dollar down and a dollar a week; the high school graduating class numbered 93. This was 1920.
 
On Thursday April 29, 1920 E.B. Johnson of Minneapolis, representing the district governor, met with 22 charter members of the Faribault Rotary Club. The charter was dated May 1, 1920. By the end of the first year, the membership had reached 35 and 21 members were added in the second year.
 
The first meetings were held at the episcopal Guild House. Mrs. Anna Kahn was the cook-hostess. Her lunches established a tradition of good food for the club. In 1926, the club moved its meeting place to the ELKS Club with the provision that the price of the lunch would not be more than sixty cents. In 1929, with the completion of the Harvey Hotel (Hotel Faribault) the club moves there for its meetings. Evidently the sixty cent limit still prevailed as, in 1933, the hotel was informed the cost must be reduced to fifty cents or the club would leave. The answer must have been negative, as in 1934 the meeting place was moved to the Blue Bird Inn located on Highway 3, about the present location of Larson Electric, Inc. 
     Mrs. C. N. Crossett and the Inn were famous for fine food. Some Rotarians made a point of arriving at the meetings early for chicken giblets and other appetizers. The club moved back to the hotel and continued to meet there until 1969 when it moved to the Evergreen Knoll. The food was good, but the space was too small, so the Country Club was tried. Again, the space arrangement was not satisfactory and it was decided to move to the lavender inn.
The following article is the completes the reprint from our 75th Anniversary booklet. 
 
Murray Hanson
 
 
FARIBOTARIAN
By: Lyle Schreiber
 
Rotarians meet for more than food. Name almost any subject and Rotary has a program or speaker covering it. To name a few:
 
1925 School Problems
1928 The Mind of Youth
1930 Organized Labor
1933 Inflation
1930 The Decline of Morals -- Youth and Adults
1938 Congressman August Andreson stressed the need to curb government spending
1941 Should Faribault have an Airport?
1948 The Taft-Hartley Labor Law
1949 Socialized Medicine in Great Britain
1953 South African Race Problem
1956 Prospects of Atomic Electric Plants in Minnesota
 
Local government officials are frequent speakers to keep Rotarians advised of the problems of local government and their solutions. Owners of new and old Faribault industries are asked to tell of their products. In the last few years, club members visited Sellner Manufacturing Co., Faribault Foods, Mercury Minnesota, the remodeled library, and the Faribault correctional facility.
 
Soon after joining, Rotarians are asked to give a Classification Talk in which they give a short biographical sketch and a description of their occupation. These talks are some of the most interesting programs.
 
Beginning in 1940, selected students from local high schools were invited to be guests of the club at regular weekly meetings. This program has continued to the present. Two students from Faribault Senior High School, Bethlehem Academy or Shattuck-St. Mary's attend for two weeks. At the second meeting the students give a resume of their school activities. 
 
Rotary has a program for sending selected local high school students to a foreign country for a year and, in exchange, serves as a host to students from other countries. The Faribault club has had guests from Australia, Brazil, South Africa, and Ethiopia, and sent students to Greenland, Norway, Spain, Japan and Germany.
 
From its beginning, the Faribault Rotary Club has been interested in youth programs. The club assisted in organizing Boy Scout troops and sponsored a summer picnic for boys for several years. Rotarians furnished transportation to roll students who wanted to take part in athletics. The Rotary camp was built for use by Scouts and other Youth groups.
 
Believing that there should be recognition of those students who are academically superior, the club, in 1962, invited those members of the senior class from the High School and Bethlehem Academy who had a grade point average of 3.5 or better to an Honors Banquet. This recognition has continued and the students parents' are invited to attend.
 
To provide funds for the maintenance of the youth camp and for music scholarships, the Rotary club sponsors the first combined high school orchestra, band and choir concert of the year. At Christmas time, the high school choir performs part of their Christmas concert at a regular dinner meeting. For several years the dinner has been held at Shattuck-St. Mary's refractory and Shumway auditorium. A new fundraiser has been the October Rose sale. In 1994, more than 700 dozen roses were sold.
 
When Rotary was organized February 23, 1905 it was a men's organization. It remained so until 1987 when, by action of the Rotary international, the membership of women was authorized. Janine Sahagian was the first woman to be a member of the Faribault Club. Today there are 1,197,308 Rotarians in 27,173 clubs in 151 countries.
 
With 75 years of service to the community, the Faribault Rotary Club looks forward to growth and service.

Security Bank Clock

On Tuesday September 22 at 6:15 pm Faribault Rotary Club and the City Council of the City of Faribault had a dedication ceremony for the renovated Security Bank clock at 302 Central Ave.  Mayor John Jasinski began the ceremony thanking all those involved including the Faribault Rotary Club, city staff, and Mike Elwood/ Jim Pilcher, who repaired the clock.  President Huston talked about our Rotary Club's  96 years of contributions to our community and how Rotary International's Polio eradification efforts around the world have isolated the virus to just Pakistan and Afghanistan. He also read the dedication plaque on display near the base of the clock.  Also, special thanks to Rotarian and Chamber President Kymn Anderson for her leadership and hard work in making Al Burkhartmeyer's wish to have this clock working again. 
Video link to the ceremony-    http://vimeo.com/140147357
 
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Upcoming Events
 
Speakers
Annika Dornbusch
Oct 24, 2018
Trip to Australia
Dave Beranek
Oct 31, 2018
Youth Services
Tim Murray
Nov 07, 2018
Classification
No Meeting
Nov 21, 2018
Happy Thanksgiving
Daisey Sanchez
Nov 28, 2018
Classification
Peter van Sluis
Dec 05, 2018
Saint Nicholas