February 2018
S M T W T F S
28
29
30
31
02
03
04
05
07
08
09
10
11
12
14
16
17
18
19
21
22
23
24
25
26
28
01
02
03
 
Upcoming Events
 
Club Executives & Directors
President
President Elect
Past President
Rotary International Foundation
Treasurer
Secretary
Membership
Public Relations
Club Bulletin
eBulletin/Web Director
Community Service
Program Chair
Vocational Services
World Service
Social Director
STRIVE Coordinator
Club Foundation Chair
 
BULLETIN SUBSCRIBE
Subscribe to our eBulletin and stay up to date on the latest news and events.
 
 
Our Club
 
Home Page Stories
Our program on the 13th was a presentation by Todd Bolling, from the RI District membership committee. He described a number of programs that have worked well for some area clubs, and gave us 10 tips to attract and retain quality members.
He said that all of the clubs are having to increase their efforts to attract new members. He suggested having an open house and inviting locals to come and hear about Rotary. He showed a video done by Chanhassen that has been effective.
 
STRIVE on Thursday, February 15th was Randy Schumacher presenting on Financial Management.  One might think that this topic doesn’t sound fun, involving or interesting to students but the STRIVE kids loved it.  Randy involved every student and covered everything from saving, budgeting, credit scores, wages, alternative ways to finance college, each of the kids families and their favorite music.  And it all worked great as Rand had a wonderful manner to engage and entertain our STRIVE group.
Our program on February 6th was a talk by Duke Pieper entitled “Never Give Up”.
 
As a kid and a young teenager, he was hooked by the hockey bug. He went to Shattuck in grade school for their hockey program. He transferred to Hill-Murray in St Paul, and as a freshman he was their first line defenseman. He was rated twentieth in the 2008 national prospects listings.
 
Before a game, he didn’t feel right, and stayed on the bench. He went from the arena to the emergency room where they discovered he had a brain dysfunction that was similar to a stroke. After a 23 hour operation, he had three more operations while spending the next 9 months in the hospital. He is now at the U of M studying sports management, planning on becoming a skating (hockey) coach.
His message is that you are your own best cheerleader, and you have to believe in yourself. He has written a book about positivity, and has a 15 point list of things you must do to be your best.
Our program on the 23rd was a presentation about the Treehouse Program. The Treehouse is one of the charities that the morning club has designated as a charity that they are giving some of their funds from the Annual Golf Outing to support this year and so has our club several times of the years.  
                       
Treehouse is a group started in 1986 which deals with troubled teenagers.  They have 9 locations in the Twin Cities, and the local one is housed in the Excelsior Covenant church. They work one-on-one, mentoring kids and helping them understand and resolve personal issues. It is a free program, and even provides free transportation to their two weekly gatherings. They provide free dinners to teens with problems on Tuesdays and Thursdays.  
                                                                                                                            
Two strong statements of support were given by Steve Frazier who saw their work when he was a counselor at Minnetonka West Middle School, and from Dr. Don Draayer. Our club gave $500.00 from our funds, and also donated the day’s Happy Bucks to support them.                                                                      
Contact information (to volunteer time or donations) Paul Borowski (from the AM Club) 612-432-9353, or Josh Ganados 602-920-0466. We could set up a group to sponsor and serve dinner one night……..                                                                                                               
 STRIVE on Thursday, January 25 was Steve Frazier presenting on “Goal Setting” as it applies to Academic Achievement and Post-Secondary Planning.  Steve used two students to help the group understand how to make goals that really work in getting better grades and also to make a plan for their Post-secondary Education goals.  Students then met with the STRIVE Mentors and worked on their two goals and action plans.  We had a great time with the kids and they really appreciated and adopted Steve’s favorite quote that “The difference between a wish and a goal is a plan”.
Last week on January 30th we held our gathering at Mount Calvary Church where we packed meals for “Many Hands Many Meals”.  Because we were short of members (see Empty chairs section above), we didn’t run the full four lines of packing. We ran three lines, so we set no records for production efficiency. But, as it always is, we had a good time and we packed 4,536 meals for the war-torn and starving people of Yemen.
                                                                      
There was no official program for the day, so there was no Happy Bucks. But there was a Happy Surprise: Amy Mook (back row left) was in town and joined us for the session. She always brings smiles with her when she attends our gatherings.       
 
                                                                                                                
STRIVE on Thursday, February 1st was Darel Leipold presenting on Choices.  Darel gave a wonderful presentation and shared
with the students that making good choices/decisions fit perfectly with the previous week’s lesson on Goal Setting and achieving their goals depends on good decision making.  Darel quoted the Robert Frost poem “The Road Not Taken” and tied it to their life journey and that the choices they make determine the road that the take and how successful they will become. He also pointed out that our choices don’t effect ourselves but also other in our life and those in our future.  He ended his presentation with descriptions of famous the famous leaders Henry Ford, Thomas Edison, Teddy Roosevelt and ended with his life journey and the choices he made.  The students them met with our Rotary Mentors and discussed their good and bad decisions and choices they are make for their post-secondary education.                                             
 
Last Meetings Program on January 16th was a presentation by local businessman John Leverty. John gave us a briefing as to how he selects the correct health insurance program for his clients. John started in the underwriting department of Blue Cross and then moved into the retailing of insurance personal and group policies. He joined the office of Paul Swanson here in town where he handles health insurance coverages for their clients.
 
He took an average client and walked us through the different options and choices the client has as far as overages are concerned. The three major health insurers in the state (all of whom John represents) offer a wide range of deductibles, co-pays, and medical networks for the client to choose from.
 
John acts as an agent handling his own clients, and he also acts as an advisor to other agents who place coverages through the Swanson Agency for their clients.
 
Puzzler for the day: Why are 1984 bottles of whiskey more valuable than 1977 bottles of whiskey?
 
Fun Facts:
 
Ingesting TNT will cause a person’s urine to turn red.
Snails can live up to 15 years.
It’s against the law in San Francisco to pick up and throw used confetti.
Blue eyes are a genetic mutation. Before it occurred, everyone had brown eyes.
Americans collectively eat one hundred pounds of chocolate every second.
 
Answer to the puzzler: Because there are seven more bottles.
 
Golf Planning Committee: Organization meeting at 6:00PM at Hazelwood in Fireside Room.
 
STRIVE this Week: Goal setting with Steve Frazier at 10:00 in
Writing Lab at MHS
Our Program on January 9th was a presentation on the Haiti Outreach Program, and it was given by Dale Snyder, the Executive Director of the project.
 
Started 20 years ago locally, the vision of the group is to have Haiti become a developed country. They collaborate with the people of Haiti, and the Outreach provides the funding. education, and training so that the local people can build and maintain their own source of safe water. For the past three years, they have funded over 150 wells in the Pignon area of Haiti.
 
In addition to providing wells with safe drinking water, the group is on a project to provide latrines for 100% of the residents in their area. They have increased the availability of a latrine from only 26% coverage to 92% in their area.
One of our former members, Pam Prosser, introduced our club to this organization a few years ago, and it is impressive how successful they have been.