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DVSRC News
A great service project for the Dundas Community! Over 400 boxes of documents were safely destroyed and diverted from landfill. Each spring and fall the Rotary Club of Dundas Valley Sunrise holds a shredding day and the community appreciates it. The price was $8 a bank box but many individuals refused change because they knew the good work of Rotary as it serves both the local and international communities. Funds raised help support the world wide elimination of polio, youth programs and bursaries, local tree planting, and literacy programs to name just a few of the
things supported by the club.
 
Club members Kathy Starodub, Ross Bannatyne and Jody Beck load a bin for shredding while Bob Morrow collects payment.
 
Peter Dendekker waits to load the next bin into the shredder as a client watches the TV camera to ensure his documents are destroyed.
 
A special thank you to Bruce and Scott Eccles for the use of the Eccles Auto Service lot and their signs.
Our meeting last week was cancelled due to a mix-up/locked door at the golf club...but in the meantime here is a great update from Bob Morrow on the presentation of donation from our club in Portugal.
 
With many thanks, and credit given, to the board and the club of Dundas Valley Sunrise Rotary Club, last night, I was able to present 200Euros towards the purchase of 4 uniforms for the local volunteer “bombeiros” or fire fighters who have been battling terrible fires in the Algarve, in Portugal.
 
The evening was interesting as a fundraiser as well...dinner was 35 Euros (cost to the club was 25 Euros), the wine was all donated by the winery, and through a raffle and sales of the wine, they raised quite a bit of money in one evening and had great fellowship at the same time.  Several people indicated they would contribute amounts to every bottle of wine sold. For example, my Rotarian friend and VP of the Wine Appreciation Fellowship, Claire Larson, gave 25 cents for every bottle sold that evening...the winery gave 30 cents, and one other individual gave 45 cents...so, for every bottle of wine sold, they were getting 1 Euro.  I calculated (and I admit it was a rough guess), that they sold 400 - 500 bottles of wine following the dinner.
 
Great fundraiser, really good fellowship, and, again the Dundas Valley Sunrises Rotary Club looked great.  MANY people came up to me afterward and thanked the club for its contribution.
 
 
The “wine room” at the back of the restaurant (this is one half), was completely full. 
 
 
 And, this is what we raised money for...

 
A sample of the wines ... some of which are available at the LCBO

 
And, last, but not least, the presentation of the donation from the Dundas Valley Sunrise Rotary Club

 
 
 

On Tuesday, March 5 our speaker was Dr. Marisa Slavin. Dr. Slavin is a palliative care doctor with an interest and focus on Climate Change. This interest began back in 2006 after watching the documentary film “An Inconvenient Truth” 

Although this film had an initial impact on Marisa, it wasn’t until 2015 when her focus truly shifted to Climate Change with the release of her book “Code Blue”. One of the biggest questions around Climate Change is “Is it real?” Nothing can be 100% sure however all evidence points to it being true so we should prepare for the worst. 

Results of Climate Change: 

  • Floods 
  • Droughts 
  • Extreme Weather 
  • Extinction of species 
  • Famine 

We simply need to watch the news to recognize that Climate Change is happening. Scientists say carbon dioxide levels are rising creating a greenhouse effect….that warms the planet.

97% of scientists worldwide agree that global warming trends are directly related to climate change. In addition to these scientists, hundreds of large international organizations also agree. 

When we look at a list of what countries contribute to global warming, China tops the list followed by the USA and India. Canada sits down on this list and one would think we are a low contributor to global warming however if you look at it as per capita against population, we are one of the worst contributors. 

While the USA is not signed on to the Paris Climate Agreement, they are in fact lowering emission levels but this is due to State and municipal governments who continue to support emission reduction initiatives. 

China has targeted 70% below 2005 levels by 2030. 

India is an area of concern however they are making progress in renewable energy which they are a world leader in. They are the 4th largest wind power country and they have completed the world’s largest solar plant. 

What can we do to help? 

1) Educate ourselves and others 

2) Donate to environmental causes 

3) Protest….let our government know we want change 

4) Vote! 

5) Eat less meat 

6) Walk or bike 

7) Consume less. 

“Things that are a great benefit to us all are becoming a threat to us all.” 

We are the first generation that understands climate change and the last generation that can do anything about it. 

Since Oct 2018, 3 separate organizations have said rapid environmental change needs to take place by all nations. They noted hundreds of billions of dollars in damage to the US economy due to climate change. 

The Rio Earth Summit in 1992 set emission targets for all countries to meet. Since then other summits have set new targets yet despite all of this, omission levels have grown by 20 percent in Canada alone. We have missed every target from all climate change conferences. 

IN 2018 alone, the earth experienced at least 8 major climate related disasters around the world. 

Dave talked about communications and technology changes through the ages and the affect this has had on the environment.

Where are we today? 

 

We continually strive to improve our comfort and security and overall enjoyment of life while this contributes to environmental damage. 

Dave pointed out that damage to the environment is not new…it began back in 1750. and accelerated as technology advanced. 

 

World co2 emissions continue to grow. 

Canada is number 1 per capita 

9th by emissions 

38th by population 

 

Climate change is about physics and chemistry 

 

What can we change? 

1) Change our consumption and desires 

2) Change our sources and use of energy 

3) Change our response to what we know. 

 

Until the general public understand the crisis they won’t support the strong actions required. Governments need to save the environment so that we can have a livable society and economy. 

* We need to update our Paris accord targets 

* We need to set further laws, incentives and regulations to meet our new target 

 

As individuals what can we do? 

1) Continue to educate ourselves about climate change 

2) Speak up and out about it 

3) Accept that it requires major changes to our social and economic systems 

4) Get ready in our personal lives 

What can we do in our daily lives? 

 

1) Shop less 

2) Less air and cruise travel 

3) Drive less (cars are the largest source of emissions in Hamilton) 

4) Eat lower on the food chain (less meat…more protein from grains) 

 

 

Our speaker on Tuesday, February 19th was Krista Craig. Krista is a Donor Relations and Engagement Specialist with the Good Shepherd in Hamilton where she has worked for the past 5 years. Inspired by the Hospitality of St. John of God and rooted in Catholic teachings, Good Shepherd provides person-centred health, housing and human services. Krista came to basically thank us for our support in the past and to give us some statistics from the previous year’s work. There is much more about the Good Shepherd here: https://www.goodshepherdcentres.ca/ 

The Good Shepherd has a budget of about $12 million per year with $7 million coming from government sources with the rest being fund raised. A history of the Good Shepherd is available on their website. The first service provided was the Men’s Centre which opened in 1961 and served 80 males. In 2018 742 individual men stayed in the Centre and more than 52,000 meals were served.

The Venture Centre Marketplace is set up like a grocery store and is also the location where donations can be made: https://www.goodshepherdcentres.ca/food-bank-clothing-room. More than 80,000 people used the foodbank last year. Their Family Centre is the only centre for families in Hamilton. The centre helps families with housing searches and landlord/tenant disputes. 

Women’s services are supplied through Martha House and Mary’s Place: https://www.goodshepherdcentres.ca/womens-services and Youth Services are provided at 3 locations – Notre Dame House, Brennan House and Regina’s Place: https://www.goodshepherdcentres.ca/womens-services. In 2018, 249 youth stayed in one the shelters. Good Shepherd also runs several programs for seniors: https://www.goodshepherdcentres.ca/assisted-living-for-seniors. As Krista, said, literally from cradle to grave! 

Good Shepherd is in constant need of volunteers and donations. The Family Centre makes up Welcome Baskets and the Women’s Centres require things like toiletries and towels. Youth Services can always use bus tickets and all Centres can use gift cards. Donations can be made at 155 Cannon Street (the old City Chev-Olds dealership).

On Tuesday, February 5 our guest speaker was Archdeacon Val Kerr of the Niagara Diocese. Val, of Haudenosaunee decent, grew up East of Bellville and presented on the theme of Truth and Reconciliation. She is a widow with two sons and six great grandchildren. Herself abused she does not dwell on it. She explained the role that residential schools played in disconnecting generations from their parents and grandparents the latter of which typically cared for the children while the parents worked to provide for the family. Val informed us that while some of the schools were okay the purpose was to take the Indian (savage) out of the children. 
 
We were informed that Treaties with the Federal Government were supposed to provide Healthcare, Education & Housing but the services are lacking due to inadequate funding.
 
Val also provided some statistics. There are more children in foster care today than were in residential schools. She explained that one hospital in Western Canada took 40 babies at birth to be placed in foster care. She called on the Federal Government to educate indigenous mothers on how to care for their children. Val recommended reading a book titled Seven Fallen Feathers by author Tanya Talaga covering the subject of racism. 

“Things that are a great benefit to us all are becoming a threat to us all.” 

On Tuesday, January 22 Club Member Dave Carson spoke about the very important issue of climate change. Dave sits on the Board of Environment Hamilton and is passionate about saving this planet! Below is a summary of his presentation.

-----------------------------------------------------------------

We are the first generation that understands climate change and the last generation that can do anything about it.

Since Oct 2018, 3 separate organizations have said rapid environmental change needs to take place by all nations. They noted hundreds of billions of dollars in damage to the US economy due to climate change. 

The Rio Earth Summit in 1992 set emission targets for all countries to meet. Since then other summits have set new targets yet despite all of this, omission levels have grown by 20 percent in Canada alone. We have missed every target from all climate change conferences. 

In 2018 alone, the earth experienced at least 8 major climate related disasters around the world. 

Dave talked about communications and technology changes through the ages and the affect this has had on the environment. 

Where are we today? 

We continually strive to improve our comfort and security and overall enjoyment of life while this contributes to environmental damage. None of this is new…it began back in 1750. and accelerated as technology advanced. 

  • World co2 emissions continue to grow. 
  • Canada is number 1 per capita 
  • 9th by emissions 
  • 38th by population 

Climate change is about physics and chemistry 

What can we change? 

1) Change our consumption and desires 

2) Change our sources and use of energy 

3) Change our response to what we know. 

Until the general public understand the crisis they won’t support the strong actions required. Governments need to save the environment so that we can have a livable society and economy. 

* We need to update our Paris accord targets 

* We need to set further laws, incentives and regulations to meet our new target 

As individuals what can we do? 

1) Continue to educate ourselves about climate change 

2) Speak up and out about it 

3) Accept that it requires major changes to our social and economic systems 

4) Get ready in our personal lives

 

What can we do in our daily lives? 

1) Shop less 

2) Less air and cruise travel 

3) Drive less (cars are the largest source of emissions in Hamilton) 

4) Eat lower on the food chain (less meat…more protein from grains) 

On November 27th the Sunrise Rotary Club was pleased to present Jim Sweetman with a cheque for $500 to support the Good Food Box program. “Our objective is to get more fresh fruit and vegetables into the hands of Dundas residents," Jim told us". "Where possible we also want to support local farmers thereby increasing our local capacity to produce the food we need.” It has been in operation since January 2011, hence it’ up to 9th consecutive years food box deliveries.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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