News Updates

Almost Past President Mary Ann told us that, when she started her journey as President, her passion was the eradication of Polio. We just recently heard that Africa is now Polio free! She said she has been inspired by the hard work and dedication and thanked everyone for making this the Best Rotary Club in the World!

She acknowledged everyone who served on the Foundation Board and those on the Club Board.

Special thanks went out to the chairs and members of the various Avenues of Service: Christel Chesney, Club Service; Miguel Sandoval, Community Service; Cynthia Woodruff-Neer, Youth Service; Gerry Porter, International Service and Laudon Rowen, Vocational Service.

Also recognized were Julie Jenkins who did an amazing job with Awards; PE Nominee Patty Griffin for her work as Grants Chair; Nancy McKarney for a great job as Membership Chair and Otis Archie for Public Relations.

Mary Ann also thanked Sgt-At-Arms Andrew Boyd-Goodrich for getting our meeting going; Otis Archie for the weekly invocations; Donna Crocker for providing so many interesting programs; Nancy Carr for all the personal notes she sent out for Family of Rotary; Julia Rice for organizing our lunches each week; PP Mike Griffin for being the Neal Jensen Cheerleader; Fine Master Rick Low for the humorous way he made sure all pledges were paid; PP Sheriff Dick Cameron for making sure everyone wears their pin and, Bob Putney for all his work as Polio & TRF Chair and Club Executive Secretary.

President Mary Ann then presented an Above & Beyond pin to Linda Sherman, Cynthia Woodruff-Neer and Sue Robinson.

Mary Ann acknowledged the amazing job Miguel Sandoval has done organizing and carrying out the community food program that has helped so many of our local residents impacted by COVID-19 layoffs. In recognition of his efforts, Miguel was named Rotarian of the Year and presented with a Paul Harris pin. Congratulations Miguel.

Our Prez then told us that she would be taking some time during future meeting to acknowledge other club members.

We were thrilled to be joined by 6 of the 9 students who were each awarded $1,000 scholarships by our club. The students told us about their future plans. David Amodei will be attending Cuesta before transferring to a 4 year university in pursuit of a BS in Business/ Hospitality Management; Fiona Cloward will be attending UC Davis where she has not yet declared but said her goal is to help people; Angelique Gutierrez will be going to Cal Poly to study Ag Science; Alondra Mercado will be at Fresno State studying Sociology. Julian Crocker told us that Alondra was also the recipient of the Richard J. Weyhrich Leadership Scholarship given to students who demonstrate exceptional leadership potential; Emma Sison will attend UC Davis studying Animal Science with an eye on Veterinary Medicine; and, Julie Vazquez plans to take a gap year to spend a year in Bosnia living with a Muslim Family to better understand their traditions (depending on the status of COVID-19). She then plans to attend UC Riverside majoring in Global Studies. Julie spend part of her junior year in Japan as an exchange student and now speaks Japanese! Additional scholarship recipients, Ellie Kennedy, Riley Volz and Luis Mercado were not able to attend our meeting.

As Principal Scott Ferguson said, “We can’t wait to see where life takes you”. Counselor Mary Stenbeck, who previously taught most of these students in 7th grade, tearfully told them how proud she was of them. Justin Gish, who taught many of them in 4th grade, told them he was amazed at what they have accomplished. Cynthia Woodruff-Neer explained the Rotary Wheel to the students and reminded them to be a “cog”.

In case you have any doubt that small schools like Coast can provide a first-class education, these students will prove you wrong. We wish them all the best.

Youth Services Chair Cynthia Woodruff-Neer introduced Whit Donaldson, 7th Grade Language Arts Teacher and Leslie Roper, Middle School Librarian and thanked them for their support for this year’s essay contest. There were obviously challenges since the students were participating in distance learning but, with the help of both Whit and Leslie, the deadline was met and some excellent essays were turned in. Mr. Donaldson thanked Rotary for all their support.

Cynthia then introduced Tanna Tartaglia who not only won our club’s 4-Way Test Essay contest but also won 1st place for
middle school in District 5240 which consists of 72 clubs!

Bob Kasper added that Tanna came to the Spaghetti Dinner Fundraiser and put $100 in the donation box! A future Rotarian perhaps?? A big shout out to Tanna.

Bob told us that CERT (Community Emergency Response Team) was started by Los Angeles Fire Department in 1985 to educate volunteers about disaster preparedness for the hazards that may impact their area and trains them in basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations. CERT offers a consistent, nationwide approach to volunteer training and organization that professional responders can rely on during disaster situations, allowing them to focus on more complex tasks.

Cambria Emergency Response Team was started in 2001 and, to date, 297 residents have been trained. Today we have 146 com- munity members active. Another 40 members are maintaining their skills to help themselves and family members and neighbors. Paso Robles just started their CERT and our CERT is helping them.

After the horrific fires in Paradise and other areas of California, CERT has been actively involved in the creation of evacuation pre- planning and support so community members can escape in the event of a fire. They are also working on an early warning system

that should be an improvement over the current reverse 911 system. And, they have created the R-U-O-K pro- gram (see page 5 of this newsletter).

A copy of the Power Point Presentation that Bob showed is attached to the email sent with this news- letter.

Thank you Bob for updating us on this very important service in our community. We are so lucky to have so many dedicated volunteers working to keep us safe.

ppy Easter, Happy Passover... and happy one more day without killing your housemate or neighbor! I think if this goes on much longer rather than asking for a lifting of the social distancing requirement we’ll be asking to have it extended – to no closer than 100 ft!

I am doing very well – and I am grateful to the Dept. of State Hospitals for taking such good care of us so we can take care of others.

Aims of today’s program – Increase our resilience by strengthening our immune system holistically

Get us moving
Help us to relax
And To be inspired – I think we all need some of that right now.

1) Get us moving

During this time, we need to move! The circulatory system needs help getting rid of what needs to go! And we can help that by drinking plenty of fluids, eating nutritious foods, taking supplements, and getting our heart pumping!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5mCWanhT8Dk&app=desktop

Heaven has a special place for nurses, teachers, and social workers... and so many others that take care of us. Re- member to say thank you... a box of donuts doesn’t hurt either!

2) Help us to Relax
The fight-flight-or freeze response redirects vital resources away from the immune system, as it should for

20-45 min., but not for weeks, months, or years. (see yoga nidra handout)

3) And to be inspired
We can be angry and disappointed and sad about things that aren’t happening – and that is okay. But we can

also be part of the solution by helping out and by letting others know they are not alone.

We can start replacing the time we spend listening to all the bad news, and instead start spreading the news that we are here to help.

We can wake up with a sense of purpose – to help.

We can do what needs to be done to help those in need get through this to see another day – and get back to dancing, laughing, and back to being all they can be.

We are all experiencing stress in some way from this experience. We can honor that reality, and be grateful for what we do have, and set our sadness aside to help others.

...and in so doing, we will start to see our little town blues begin to melt away.

With all that said, I want to finish with sharing the song that has lifted us up so many times, and one that reflects the strength of the human spirit, perhaps better than anything or anyone else, as evidenced by 9-11, and that is the strength, the intelligence, the endurance, the resilience of our brothers and sisters in the big apple. ...and right now, all the places that are being hardest hit by COVID-19. Let them be an inspiration of what we all can endure and how we can all come together to help one another, not as male, female, or transgender, not as black, white, brown or yellow, not as Christian, Jew, Muslim or Buddhist, not as Republican, Democrat, Inde- pendent, Communist, or Socialist, not as old, or young, healthy or infirmed; but as human beings helping one an- other to get through this. Be well.

Last month, Bruce & Jane Howard and Christel Chesney spent a couple of weeks at the Piyali Learning Center in the rural village of Piyali Junction outside Kolkata. Jane told us that Deepa Biswas grew up in Calcutta in a fairly
affluent family. She would see children begging and asked why. She vowed, after college she would come back and help. When Bruce and Jane first met Deepa in 2004, she told them she was starting a school in Piyali for girls who
had no access to education. She partnered with the Rotary Club of Calcutta and started with just 20 girls.

In 2010, Deepa was able to secure a new property that was much larger but it was on a swamp. They brought in dirt to fill in the swamp and built a wall around the property to pro- tect the girls. The new school is a far cry from the original one and includes an organic garden, chicken coop, and a vo- cational training center for the mothers of the students. Our club helped build a sewer plant so the school has flush toi- lets and we currently support 6 girls. The cost of sponsoring a girl for an entire year is only $375. To sponsor a mother to attend vocational training, the cost for a year is $175. Checks can be mailed to PACE Universal                          1 North Calle Cesar Chavez, Suite 102, Santa Barbara, CA 93103

Jane was very proud to tell us that, after her father’s death, her mom donated money to the school and there is now a classroom named in his honor.  Christel told us that she had never seen such poverty and filth that she saw while traveling from the hotel to .              the school. They were only 40 miles away but it took
them 2 hours to travel the 40 miles. She said the first 3 days, her heart was broken. They were staying in a 5 star hotel sur- rounded by poverty. There were vegetable carts covered with flies, a pond filled with algae where women were washing clothes and doing dishes while a man was bathing and another urinating in the pond. They visited homes that were hovels with dirt floors, no electricity or plumbing. The school, in contrast, was an oasis. The girls in India have dreams and aspirations but, by the time they reach 4th grade, they are pulled out of school to help with chores. Every 9 minutes a child in India disappears.

Bruce told us about a visit to Mahavir Seva Sadan, a Vocational Training Center in Kolkata. They provide prosthetics for those who need them because of lost limbs or birth defects, eye care and support and training for Cerebral Palsy vic- tims. This is a project that the local Rotary Club supports.

You can learn more about the Piyali Learning Center at 

http://paceuniversal.com/

Marcelle Bakula, who has been volunteering since 2007, gave us a brief history of the or- ganization. Pacific Wildlife Care (PWC) was founded in 1986 in reaction to the Apex Hou- ston oil spill that brought a number of oiled pelicans to the beaches of San Luis Obispo County. Since that time we have grown from a small group of dedicated home rehabilita- tors into a successful non-profit organization with a well-equipped rehabilitation center, a full-time wildlife veterinarian, a small paid staff, and over 200 volunteers. In addition to the Rehabilitation Center, which is open every day of the year, we maintain a Hotline that the public can call to report distressed wildlife (injured, sick, orphaned) and to receive infor- mation about our local wildlife. PWC's mission is to support San Luis Obispo County wildlife through rehabilitation and educational outreach.

PWC has built onto their current location over the years but they have maxed out. So they recently purchased 10 acres of land where they hope to build a state of the art facility within the next 5-10 years to house the 2,000 to 3,000 animals they take in each year. They are currently looking for sources of funding to help reach that goal.

Kelly Vandenheuvel told us that 36 years ago she heard a call to help injured wildlife. She has been caring for injured and orphaned wildlife on her ranch as a volunteer for PWC ever since. Kelly introduced us to Alice, a grey horned owl that was injured as a baby.
Due to her injuries, she is unable to be returned to the wild so she lives on Kelly’s ranch and serves as a Wildlife Ambassador. While
Alice looks quite large, she actually only weighs 3 pounds due to the fact that her bones are hollow, allowing her to fly. One of the goals of the Wildlife Ambassador Program is to teach children that wild animals are not pets and should not be treated as such. She cautions against petting any wild animals. Alice did entertain us with a number of “Hoots” during the presentation. She was probably asking how she could become a Rotarian!

Donna Crocker told us that Heather began Infant Essentials in 2013. The organization provides items for homeless and low income families. Heather is a Cambrian, a member of University Women, was named a Hands On Hero by First Five and a Hometown Hero by KSBY.

The development of Infant Essentials was a journey I began in 2012, Heather explained, when she drove past a homeless couple here in Cambria, holding a sign "looking for work, food, money". She was caught off guard when she noticed that there was a baby in a stroller behind the couple. It happened to be her daughter Gwen's First Birthday and she was coming home from the grocery store having bought food for our 15 person family celebration dinner. she felt guilty for having all of the wonderful things that we have been blessed with, but also felt helpless because what could she offer them that would make a difference in their lives? She ran home and grabbed some baby snacks from our cupboard and brought them along with $20 to the couple. They were very thankful, but Heather didn't feel any

better.

Heather said that she embraced the moment and finally put her Community Health Degree back to work and began a needs assessment. She discovered pretty quickly that diapers are in high demand amongst the homeless community. Neither the Food Stamps nor WIC programs offer diapers or diaper discounts, and none of our shelters or day centers here in SLO have the ability to store or distribute goods like diapers. Having found this information she established a non-profit organization called Infant Essentials. The goal is to provide necessary comforts to homeless and low income infants 0-3 years old.

Heather received requests for diapers, pull ups, car seats, strollers, etc. from 14 agencies around the county that have identified families in need on the North Coast. There are currently 700 homeless diaper-aged children in SLO County. In addition to the homeless population, organizations such as RISE and Stand Strong contact Infant Essentials when they identify women with infants escaping violence.

Heather thanked us for the diapers and other items we donated at our meeting.

You can learn more about Heather’s work or make a donation at https:// www.infantessentials.org/ We were please to announce to Heather that our Community Service Committee voted to make a donation to Infant Essentials and Bob Kasper invited her back to accept a “Big Check” (along with an actual one).

 

 
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Cambria Rotary Club Information

Welcome to the BEST Rotary Club in the world!
You can email us at cambriarotaryclub AT gmail.com

Cambria

Service Above Self

We meet In Person & Online
Fridays at 11:30 AM
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2905 Burton Drive Cambria or
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Cambria / San Simeon, CA
United States of America
We now meet on Zoom. 11:30 Social half hour Noon Business Meeting 12:30 Speaker

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Speakers
Dr Sylvia Whitlock
Jul 10, 2020
She was the first woman President of a Rotary Club in the world in 1989, the Rotary Club of Duarte
Robert L Chalfa
Jul 17, 2020
Thousand Smiles
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July 2020
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Birthdays
Member Birthdays:
  • Steve Ormondroyd
    July 3
  • Del Clegg
    July 8
  • Jenn Archer
    July 8
  • Joe Morrow
    July 12
  • Ed Pearce
    July 15
  • Kate Perry
    July 17
  • Jane R. Howard
    July 23
  • Tim Carr
    July 23
  • Dan McDonald
    August 3
  • Cynthia Woodruff-Neer
    August 8
  • Jim Zuur
    August 8
  • Bob Putney
    August 10
  • Gerry Porter
    August 21
  • Michael O'Sullivan
    August 21
  • Nancy J. Carr
    August 26
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Club Service
Executive Secretary
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Awards Chair
Family of Rotary
Polio Chair
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RCC Foundation President
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