Title Author Date
Happy Bucks for May
 
Happy Bucks for May is Polio Plus - There are just 2 countries and 9 cases of active polio left in the world.  
 

In 2015, the world saw historic progress against the paralyzing disease, with just two countries – Afghanistan and Pakistan – reporting a single strain of the wild virus. If the current momentum is strengthened, this year may mark the last case of wild poliovirus.

"We are closer than ever to achieving a polio-free world," said Michael K. McGovern, chair of Rotary's International PolioPlus Committee. "To ensure that no child ever again suffer the devastating effects of this disease, we must all ensure that the necessary funds and political will are firmly in place in 2016."

 
Happy Bucks for May Lisa Martin 2016-05-04 07:00:00Z
Dr. Christopher Frank, Public Health Officer
Welcome our new Public Health Officer Christopher Frank to update us on his goals and priorities.  Raised in a small town near Ann Arbor, Michigan, Dr. Frank earned his undergraduate degree at the University of Michigan and graduated from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine with an MD and a Ph.D. in Molecular Biology. After deciding that he enjoys people more than test tubes, he completed his family medicine residency at the University of Wisconsin in a specialized program designed to prepare family physicians to work in smaller communities. Chris, his wife, Jennifer Richards, and their two children, Abby and Ben moved to Port Angeles in 2010. In addition to his primary care practice, Dr. Frank is an active teacher of medical students and resident physicians as a Clinical Assistant Professor in the University Of Washington Department Of Family Medicine. In 2015, Dr. Frank became the Public Health Officer for Clallam County, and he now divides his time between NOHN and Clallam County Health and Human Services. When not working, he enjoys exploring the outdoors with his children, digging in the garden, and cooking for friends and family. Dr. Frank’s clinical areas of interest include obstetrics, pediatrics, and the care of young families.
Dr. Christopher Frank, Public Health Officer Lisa Martin 2016-04-13 07:00:00Z
Meeting 3/16/16
What a busy week, Rotarians. We had Pi Day on Monday, Ides of March on Tuesday,  and St. Patrick's Day on Thursday. That's a lot to observe in a week, but who isn't up for a slice of pie and a little luck of the Irish?
 
In the middle of all this is our meeting Wednesday. We'll hear from Tim Meyer, our exchange student. Hopefully, he'll teach us some more words. We also have Ann Murakami giving us the updates from the Rotary International Foundation. 
 
Happy Bucks go to ShelterBox for the month of March--and we are still in it to win it on the Tuna Drive. Let's feed the hungry and keep our president out of the dunk tank!
 
See you tomorrow!
Meeting 3/16/16 Wendly Lester 2016-03-15 07:00:00Z
Club Assembly Meeting March 09, 2016

Don't forget your TUNA CANS or TUNA MONEY on Wednesday!  

The need is great in our community for this easy, protein dense form of food for the most vulnerable in our community.  Each year the food bank goes through nearly 25,000 cans of year with all of their programs.  This year's tuna drive is aiming to raise 20,000 cans of tuna to meet the increasing need. Don't forget, we've been challenged by other service clubs, so let's make a good showing and do some good for those in need.
 

Board Meeting directly following club meeting

 
If you need to make up a meeting, head up a committee, or need to turn your red badge blue--please stay for the board meeting at 1pm.
 

Congratulations to Terry Gallagher on your retirement and thank you for your service to out community.  

 (From KONP: http://www.konp.com/local/11238)
 

Chief Gallagher began his law enforcement career in 1985 as the officer tasked with presenting the DARE program to elementary kids.

Before being promoted to Police Chief in 2008, he held positions as Patrol Sergeant, Detective Sergeant, and Deputy Police Chief.

Gallagher was also a member of the Clallam County Drug Task Force and the detective unit of the PAPD.

He received commendations for his participation in numerous investigations and apprehensions.

Club Assembly Meeting March 09, 2016 Wendy Lester 2016-03-07 08:00:00Z
Charles Brandt from Batelle
Marine Sciences Laboratory researches coastal issuesOur theme for March is water and sanitation and we are super excited to have Dr. Brandt, the Director of the Coastal Sciences Division within Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Energy and Environment Directorate come speak to us this week.  The division's work focuses on coastal environmental health and restoration, sustainable ocean energy, understanding and mitigating effects of climate change on coastal systems, and coastal security.
For more information, please visit their website
Charles Brandt from Batelle Wendy Lester 2016-02-29 08:00:00Z
Happy Bucks March 2016
This month, our Happy Bucks to go ShelterBox.

From their website: http://www.shelterboxusa.org/about.php?page=120

/ShelterBox Infographic part 2

The ShelterBox solution in disaster response is as simple as it is effective. We deliver the essentials people need to survive and begin to rebuild their lives in the aftermath of a disaster. 

ShelterBox aid is tailored to a disaster but typically includes a disaster relief tent for a family, thermal blankets and groundsheets, water storage and purification equipment, solar lamps, cooking utensils, a basic tool kit, mosquito nets and children’s activity pack.

Happy Bucks March 2016 Wendy Lester 2016-02-29 08:00:00Z
Speaker Karen Brown from the PDRC
We are very excited to welcome Karen Brown, Executive Director  from the Peninsula Dispute Resolution Center to our meeting this week.
The services provided at PDRC offer lower cost alternatives to conflict. From their website: 

Mediation is one way that people can resolve their conflicts and still maintain or improve the quality of the relationship with the other person. In a family, a business environment, or in small towns, this can be especially important. In a mediation session, you can expect:

  • A thorough introduction to the mediation process by trained mediators.
  • Ground rules to help keep your communication positive
  • Ample time to tell your side of the story, how you feel about it and how you would like to resolve the issues.
  • Time to listen to the other parties' side of the story and how they feel about it.
  • Participation for building an agenda for items that need resolution.
  • Negotiation of each item on the agenda.
  • Written settlement agreements that can be used as evidence of a legally binding contract between you.
  • Most mediation sessions last 2 to 3 hours. In complex cases, additional session may be scheduled.

Parenting Plan and Parenting Plan Modifications

In the state of Washington parents must have a “Parenting Plan” before a judge will grant a divorce. Complicated paperwork is the last thing parents in conflict want to deal with. Mediators can assist parents with this paperwork while at the same time help them emotionally clean up historical issues, plan for healthy communication in the future and create a game plan for dealing with potential unforeseen hot buttons; i.e. new partners, residential transfers, children's changing needs. It is so vital for children with divorcing parents that their parents move out of the pain of the past and back to fully functioning parents again. When parents can't move on, children suffer in school, in peer relationships and in self esteem. Conflict is expensive.

Family Mediation

Families are complex. Well meaning intentions like lending money, sharing responsibilities for elderly members or leaving assets in a Will can, when mixed with high emotion and/or inadequate communication can easily turn into conflict. Well meaning family members may find it hard to confront each other or the issues and so the conflict many times escalates generating huge losses of energy, both physically and emotionally. Conflict is expensive.

Business Mediation

Mediation is an effective and efficient process to help resolve employment disputes. A neutral mediator can assist parties in reaching a voluntary, negotiated agreement. Choosing mediation to resolve employment disputes promotes a better work environment, reduces costs and brings satisfaction for both the employer and the employee. According to Halvorson Human Resources, the cost of turnover ranges from approximately 3 months pay for an hourly worker to $145,000 for a hi–tech employee. Conflict is expensive.

TRAINING

Peninsula Dispute Resolution Center provides training in the following areas:

  • Mediation
  • Advanced Family Mediation Training
  • Conflict Resolution Skills
  • Communications Skills
  • Customized Business Training's

PROGRAMS

  • Mediations
  • We're In This Together (WITT) in partnership with Clallam County Juvenile Services
  • Victim/Offender Mediation
  • Restorative Justice Class
Speaker Karen Brown from the PDRC Wendy Lester 2016-02-22 08:00:00Z
2016 Tuna Drive

It's the 22nd Annual Community Tuna Fish Drive to benefit the Port Angeles Food Bank! The drive started Feb 10th and goes through until March 28th. The Port Angeles Noon Rotary invites you to participate by pledging to donate money or cans of tuna to our club as we are battling with our favorite rival service club, the Norwester Rotary! Help us be victorious over their fundraising efforts so that we can see their president, prosecuting attorney Mark Nichols, in the dunk tank, instead of our president Jessica, whom has a fear of dunk tanks! Bring your pledge of cans or dollars to the meeting or message Jessica so we can make arrangements for pick-up!

It's all in good fun to help raise 25,000 cans of tuna for our favorite food bank!

 
Tuna Challenge 2016
 
The Olympic Kiwanis Club challenges all service clubs to meet or beat their goal to collect 20 cans of tuna fish* per club member in Tuna Challenge 2016 to benefit the food banks of the North Olympic Peninsula.
 
*(Each 79 cent cash donation counts as 1 can of tuna fish)
 
 
Tuna fish is high in protein and easy to store and is one of the main staples given out by our local food banks. Join us in friendly competition from now until March 28th to see how many cans of tuna fish we can collect for this very worthy cause. Tuna can be delivered to the Port Angeles Food Bank any Monday-Wednesday-Friday morning. Be sure to tell them your service club’s name and if there are any special distribution instructions (We will gladly collect and distribute tuna to any food bank/food distribution program on the North Olympic Peninsula). Any questions contact Tim Crowley, Olympic Kiwanis Club, 457-5933 (home) email= tcrowley@wavecable.com
2016 Tuna Drive Wendy Lester 2016-02-22 08:00:00Z
Karen Goschen, Port of PA Interim Exec. Director
Happy President's Day, Rotarians!
If you're lucky enough to be enjoying a three day weekend, that is. 

Speaker

This week, we welcome Karen Goschen to catch us up on the latest news from the Port of Port Angeles. If you haven't visited the Port's website before, check it out before the meeting. Lots of information there about our little town...land, sea, and air. 

Happy Bucks

What's making you happy this week? Happy Bucks go to Volunteer Chore Services. 

Membership

New members bring fresh perspectives and ideas to our club, expand our presence in the community, and help ensure our club is strong and vibrant. We've got some great potential members in our area — it’s just a matter of finding them. Be sure to invite someone to a meeting and let them know why Rotary is important to you. 
 
 
Karen Goschen, Port of PA Interim Exec. Director Wendy Lester 2016-02-15 08:00:00Z
Rotary Students of the Month and Exchange Student, Tim Meyer

Our club assembly is looking great for this week! 
Our exchange student Tim will be giving  short program and maybe teaching us some more German. And we honor our Students of the Month for January and February. Don't forget to bring your Happy Bucks for Volunteer Chore Services this month. And mark your calendar for Peabody Creek Clean-up this Saturday. We had a great time last month. 
If you want to know what's coming up, check out our updated event calendar here: http://portal.clubrunner.ca/718/Events/Calendar

January Rotary Students of the Month
Emily Johnson, daughter of Curtis and Nancy Johnson

3.83 GPA 
3 Academic Letters of Excellence
Plans to graduate with Business Honors
4 Varsity Letters in Volleyball and the  last 2 years as team captain
3 Varsity Letters in Basketball 
2 Varsity Letters in Softball, with one more this year when the season starts in Spring
Lots of Community Service; volunteering at Jefferson Elementary every Wednesday morning in their 3rd grade classroom, helping the needy during Thanksgiving and Christmas at Queen of Angels, volunteering to serve at Winterfest, and in the spring as an umpire the youth softball
Works part time at JD's Woodfired Grill
 

Nathan Bock, son of Julie Haskins and Tom Bock

3.85 GPA
3 Academic Letters of Excellence
Academic Student of the Month
2 Varsity Letters in Swimming
Sophomore NJROTC Cadet of the Year
Military Officers Association Medal for Outstanding Leadership
American Legion Military Excellence Medal
Military Order of the World Wars Award of Merit
Commanding Officer of the Port Angeles High School NJROTC Unit; member of the Drill Team and Color Guard
Community Service; volunteering with Kids Fest, Toys for Tots, And Clean the Beach
Works part time for Black Ball Ferry Line

 

February Rotary Students of the Month
Karina Paup Byrnes, daughter of Christopher Byrnes and Elizabeth Paup Byrnes

3.83 GPA
3 Academic Letters of Excellence
Port Angeles High School Business Department Career & Technical Award of Excellence in Digital Communication Tools
Varsity Letter in Tennis
Yearbook staff and current editor
2 years in Youth & Government program
4 years of Spanish
Community Service; volunteering 3 years at the Port Angeles Food Bank, the Coastal Watershed Institute, and as a teacher's assistant. She has also volunteered with the Port Angeles Lion's Club and at the 2015 National Olympic Discovery Kids Marathon
Works part time at Sunny Farms
 

Jeffrey Glatz, son of Clair Rusch and Joseph Glatz 

3.64 GPA
3 Academic Letters of Excellence
2 Varsity Letters in Music
Teddy Roosevelt Citizenship Award 
Soroptimist STAR award winner for Music
4 Years Varsity Soccer
4 Years in Wind Ensemble; winning State Solo Ensemble Contestant 2 years running
3 Years in Jazz Band
Marching Band and Pep Band
Member of the Rider Crew
Participated in Bridge Building 2015
Community Service; volunteering at the support station for the Discovery Marathon
Currently working on obtaining his private pilot's license 
Works part time at Black Ball Ferry Line
Rotary Students of the Month and Exchange Student, Tim Meyer Wendy Lester 2016-02-06 08:00:00Z
DLTA: Extended Early Bird Registration
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1. Early Bird Savings Deadline is Now Extended to February 14 for District Leadership Training Assembly!
The DLTA 2016 Planning Committee has a Red Heart Special for you. Until Valentine's Day, February 14, 2016, Clubs may still get in on the early bird DLTA registration savings – but only until February 14, so don’t delay.
 
Meanwhile, the DLTA 2016 Planning Committee is proud to announce that this year registrations have been robust, with only a few spots left in our reserved block of rooms at the luxurious Marriott Victoria Inner Harbor. Do not hesitate one more moment if you're hoping to secure the Rotary group discount on your lodging, because our hotel block is booking to capacity. You snooze, you lose.
 
Remember, the Marriott has graciously extended our discount for any number of nights between March 26 – April 5, and you may bring family and friends for some vacation time while you are attending the excellent educational sessions and programs that we have planned for you.
 
Check out everything DLTA 2016 here:  
Welcome to DLTA 2016
 
DLTA: Extended Early Bird Registration Wendy Lester 2016-02-03 08:00:00Z
February Happy Bucks
This month, Happy Bucks are for Volunteer Chore Services. For more information about this cause, please visit: here.
 
What are you happy for this week?
February Happy Bucks Wendy Lester 2016-02-03 08:00:00Z
Mark Nichols, Clallam County Prosecuting Attorney
We welcome fellow Rotarian Mark Nichols this week to speak to us about the Justice Reinvestment Initiative. 
 
Mark Nichols was elected to serve as Clallam County Prosecuting Attorney in November of 2014.  As the Prosecuting Attorney, Mark also serves as Clallam County’s ex officio Coroner.  Prior to being elected, Mark served as Clallam County Hearing Examiner, spent over a decade working in prosecution, and also served as a federally commissioned law enforcement officer. 
Mark Nichols, Clallam County Prosecuting Attorney WL 2016-02-03 08:00:00Z
Membership Focus: Bring a friend
Rumor has it that our President-Elect, Sam Phillips, is organizing a great program for us Wednesday, the 20th. You don't want to miss out. Our focus this week is membership--new (bring a friend) and current. Let's revisit what's important to you--why you joined the Rotary Club. What can we do to strengthen our club? Fellowship is important--so important it's first in the Object of Rotary:

The Object of Rotary is to encourage and foster the ideal of service as a basis of worthy enterprise and, in particular, to encourage and foster:

  • FIRST: The development of acquaintance as an opportunity for service;
  • SECOND: High ethical standards in business and professions; the recognition of the worthiness of all useful occupations; and the dignifying of each Rotarian’s occupation as an opportunity to serve society;
  • THIRD: The application of the ideal of service in each Rotarian’s personal, business, and community life;
  • FOURTH: The advancement of international understanding, goodwill, and peace through a world fellowship of business and professional persons united in the ideal of service.
  • Source: https://www.rotary.org/myrotary/en/learning-reference/about-rotary/guiding-principles
  •  
  • Our club is only as strong as our members, let's celebrate together. 
 
 
Membership Focus: Bring a friend Wendy Lester 2016-01-18 08:00:00Z
Happy Bucks January
 
Our Happy Bucks cause this month is literacy.
 
According to statistics, 1 out of 5 people is functionally illiterate. Think of all the ways this can impact a person--it can be a barrier to getting a family wage job, managing finances, understanding medical needs, reading medicine directions or food labels...even being able to attend school to gain skills presents barriers.  Happy Bucks for this month go to the Clallam County Literacy Council which is a program of United Way of Clallam County. 
 
The Literacy Council is focused on getting books into the hands of children, especially those living in poverty, and provides one on one free tutoring for adults.  The Council gives out books to the Food Banks throughout the county, at events, to nonprofit agencies, and supports a county wide reading contest that is currently going on in all elementary and middles schools, at libraries, in Head Starts, at nonprofit agencies serving children, and at a few child care centers.  Two Club members, Jody Moss, and Wendy Lester are volunteers on the Council.  Our Rotary Club has supported literacy through partnerships with the Literacy Council for many years. 
 
Don't forget to bring your dollars and your good news this week!
 
Want to know what's coming up?
 
January – Literacy
February – Volunteer Chore Services
March – Shelter Box
April – Literacy
May – Polio Plus
Happy Bucks January Wendy Lester 2016-01-13 08:00:00Z
Club Assembly Meeting This Week
For our first club assembly of 2016, we welcome November and December Students of the Month and hear Rotarian Shana Scott's classification talk. In case you missed it, this month our Happy Bucks are being collected for the Clallam County Literacy Council.
 
Here's a little bit about the awesome students we are honoring:
 
November Rotary Students of the Month
Jayden Sparhawk, daughter of Lisa Sparhawk
3.97 GPA Running Start Student
2 Academic Letters of Excellence
Varsity Letter in Community Service, volunteering at My Choices, Swim and Dive meets and the Humane Society
Varsity letters in Swim and Dive 
Phi Theta Kappa Scholar at Peninsula College
Active in the Honor Society, Christian Club and Dinosaur Club
Plays Piano and enjoys art, writing, and animation
 
Wei-Yan Fu, son of Fung and Kuen Fu
3.72 GPA
3 Academic Letters of Excellence
AP Scholar with Honor Award; by completing 16 AP, UW, and Honors classes
3 Varsity Letters in Soccer and 3 years as Captain
4 and 5th in State for Swimming
Won the Junior Young Artist Competition in Piano
He has been playing the piano since he was 6.
 Played at Carnegie Hall with PAHS Symphony
Besides the piano, He also plays the Cello
 
December Rotary Students of the Month
Sydney Roberts, daughter of Joe and Patty Roberts
3.9 GPA Running Start Student
2 Academic Letters of Excellence
3 Varsity Letters in Community Services; YMCA, Hospital, Food Bank, and PA School District
Phi Theta Kappa Scholar at Peninsula College
National Hispanic Academic Excellence Award
 Selected for All Washington Academic Team 
Received the National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists Award of Excellence
Was District 1 Representative for Washington Community and Technical College Student Association
Was Washington Legislative Youth Advisory Council
Peninsula College Student Body President
 
Elijah Dumdie, son of Dennis Dumdie and Teresa Thompson 
3.95 GPA
3 Academic Letters of Excellence
Soroptimist International Academic Award
5 time Student of the Triad in Business Education
Deputy Black Belt in martial arts; which he has done for 9 years
Sailing Team
ESL President
Java Club President
FBLA Historian and Science Club officer
Port Angeles School Board Representative
Port Angeles High School Student Body President
Club Assembly Meeting This Week Wendy Lester 2016-01-13 08:00:00Z
Revitalize Port Angeles and Leslie Kidwell Robertson

From a recent post to the Revitalize Port Angeles Facebook page by Leslie Kidwell Robertson (with some editing).  

Revitalize Port Angeles is for people who love where we live, and who want to invest in making our town and the community better. The variety of things that we've accomplished over the past few months just proves that there are no limits to how many ways we can do this. Whether it's addressing a local issue and working to solve it, or celebrating something great so that we are inspired to do more, we are here to make Port Angeles a better place. As most of you know, we are not in the business of denial, or pretending that problems don't exist. In fact, we're not afraid to tackle them head on, and have done so often. But we do insist that discussions of these challenges are focused on making them better.

Revitalize is for people who want to identify community challenges so that we can work together toward making them better.  Revitalize is for people who want to respectfully discuss difficult issues, so that all sides may be presented and we can all become a little better informed. Revitalize is for people who want to take a positive approach toward making things better, and who are willing to offer their time, money, ideas, creativity, spirit, and effort in making that happen. 

We welcome and encourage open discussion and debate, but the Revitalize Port Angeles Facebook page is not a free-for all where anything goes.

 Revitalize Port Angeles IS the place for changing the world, one small, beautiful town at a time!  

 

 

 

Editor's addition - Revitalize Port Angeles is more than a Facebook page - it is a place to engage people who want to become more actively involved in improving their community.  We at Rotary are very excited to welcome Leslie to our meeting this week and to learn how our Rotary Club might fit into this picture.  

Revitalize Port Angeles and Leslie Kidwell Robertson Jody Moss 2016-01-06 08:00:00Z
Religious Freedom and the Constitution--Suzanne DeBey
Religious Freedom and the Constitution--Suzanne DeBey Wendy Lester 2015-12-02 08:00:00Z
December Happy Bucks
December Happy Bucks go to VIMO http://www.vimoclinic.org/
December Happy Bucks Wendy Lester 2015-12-02 08:00:00Z
Club Assembly meeting
 
 
 
Club Assembly meeting Wendy Lester 2015-11-10 08:00:00Z
Rotary Students of the Month September and October
Rotary Students of the Month September and October Wendy Lester 2015-11-10 08:00:00Z
Happy Bucks for October
Happy Bucks for October Wendy Lester 2015-10-27 07:00:00Z
School Board Candidate Forum
School Board Candidate Forum Jody Moss 2015-10-22 07:00:00Z
Meeting Location
Just a reminder, that our new meeting location is now at the Asian Buffet locates at 160 Plaza Street across from Taco Bell / KFC. You can arrive early and pay as you come in or if there is a line, pay as you leave.  
 
See you all there.  
Meeting Location Jody Moss 2015-10-20 07:00:00Z
City of Port Angeles Candidate Forum
City of Port Angeles Candidate Forum Jody Moss 2015-10-19 07:00:00Z
Nigeria Declared Polio Free; Removed from Endemic List
Nigeria Declared Polio Free; Removed from Endemic List Jod 2015-09-30 07:00:00Z
Fire Prevention Week
Fire Prevention Week Jody Moss 2015-09-30 07:00:00Z
On the Road Again
 
Moving again.  We will be meeting at Red Lion on October 7th, and then then, our meetings will move to the Asian Buffet locates at 160 Plaza Street across from Taco Bell / KFC. 
On the Road Again Jody Moss 2015-09-29 07:00:00Z
Fireside Orientation Held for New Members
Seven new Rotarians took one step closer to their Blue Badge at a Fireside Orientation this week.  we are looking forward to their additional steps towards their Blue Badge. 
Fireside Orientation Held for New Members Jody Moss 2015-09-29 07:00:00Z
District 3 Port Commissioner's Race
District 3 Port Commissioner's Race Jody Moss 2015-09-29 07:00:00Z
Bulbs to Pick up and Purchase
Many Rotarians volunteered over the weekend, and sold many bulbs...but there are still more to sell, and many to be picked up.  We will be making a plan for selling the remainder of the bulbs and for order pick up this week. thanks for all the help!
Bulbs to Pick up and Purchase Jody Moss 2015-09-21 07:00:00Z
Meet the County Commissioner Candidates
Come meet the two candidates for County Commissioner. From each candidates' website:
 
Mark Ozias is an experienced business owner and non-profit executive who has led, consulted and worked for numerous organizations in a career that spans three decades. He serves as Executive Director of the Sequim Food Bank. A former small business owner, Mark knows what it means to meet a payroll and to navigate complex government regulations. Mark has served local government as Vice-Chair of the Sequim Planning Commission. Mark is passionate about building the local economy and providing the necessary tools to train our workforce, young and old alike, to grow family-wage jobs in Clallam County. He believes that citizen engagement is the key to government transparency and efficiency.
 

I am running for County Commissioner because I am a proven leader whose collaborative approach engages citizens and stakeholders in the planning and decision-making process, leading to better results.

I look forward to elevating the entrepreneurial small business owners who are today’s job-creators and the leaders of tomorrow’s economy as well as looking outward for new “big picture” opportunities that take advantage of our unique resources and skilled workforce.

My priorities include increased planning for water scarcity and other vital environmental issues such as global climate change, a renewed focus on the crucial subject of community health, and a commitment to transparency and open government.

Incumbent Commissioner, Jim McEntire served in the U.S. Coast Guard for 32 years (28 as an officer) retiring as a Captain. He served an additional 6 years as a civil servant in Washington, DC, retiring from the federal Senior Executive Service. He was elected countywide in 2007, to the District I seat on the Port of Port Angeles Commission, and elected countywide in 2011 to the District I seat on the Clallam County Board of Commissioners, where he currently serves the citizenry.

Jim has extensive experience in the Federal budgeting and policy development – he was the U.S. Coast Guard’s budget officer, and later, the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Budget and Strategic Planning at the U.S. Department of Labor.

As a County Commissioner, Jim’s focus has been on economic development and fiscal discipline: he has never voted to increase the County’s general government tax levy, and recently voted to cut the County’s sales tax. This action directly helps working family budgets, and reduces the economic burden on all of our citizens.

Meet the County Commissioner Candidates Jody 2015-09-20 07:00:00Z
Fall Bulbs Are Here!!!!
Fall Bulbs Are Here!!!! Jo 2015-09-16 07:00:00Z
United Way of Clallam County
United Way of Clallam County Jody Moss 2015-09-15 07:00:00Z
Prison Education Programs,
Prison Education Programs, Jody Moss 2015-09-02 07:00:00Z
The Power of a Prison Education
The Power of a Prison Education Eric Westervelt 2015-09-02 07:00:00Z
Rotary District Membership Summits
Rotary District Membership Summits Jody Moss 2015-08-25 07:00:00Z
Elementary School Tutor / Mentor Program at Dry Creek with Principal Michael Herzog
 
Elementary School Tutor / Mentor Program at Dry Creek with Principal Michael Herzog Jody Moss 2015-08-25 07:00:00Z
Fun Ideas for Mentors
 
Fun Ideas for Mentors Jody Moss 2015-08-24 07:00:00Z
Revitalize Port Angeles, and Leslie Kidwell Robertson
Revitalize Port Angeles, and Leslie Kidwell Robertson Jody Moss 2015-08-19 07:00:00Z
Tinly Libraries for People on the Move
Tinly Libraries for People on the Move Jody Moss 2015-08-19 07:00:00Z
Revitalize Port Angeles, and Leslie Kidwell Robertson

From a recent post to the Revitalize Port Angeles Facebook page by Leslie Kidwell Robertson (with some editing).  

Revitalize Port Angeles is for people who love where we live, and who want to invest in making our town and the community better. The variety of things that we've accomplished over the past few months just proves that there are no limits to how many ways we can do this. Whether it's addressing a local issue and working to solve it, or celebrating something great so that we are inspired to do more, we are here to make Port Angeles a better place. As most of you know, we are not in the business of denial, or pretending that problems don't exist. In fact, we're not afraid to tackle them head on, and have done so often. But we do insist that discussions of these challenges are focused on making them better.

Revitalize is for people who want to identify community challenges so that we can work together toward making them better. It is NOT for people who simply want to complain, and use social media as a platform to show everyone how awful everything is. Revitalize is for people who want to respectfully discuss difficult issues, so that all sides may be presented and we can all become a little better informed. It is NOT for people who are dismissive to those who don't agree with them, or have a personal ax to grind. Revitalize is for people who want to take a positive approach toward making things better, and who are willing to offer their time, money, ideas, creativity, spirit, and effort in making that happen. It is NOT for people who want to criticize the way that others are trying to improve things, but are unwilling to do anything about it themselves.

We welcome and encourage open discussion and debate, but the Revitalize Port Angeles Facebook page is not a free-for all where anything goes. We do not want to see posts of graphic pictures whose only purpose is to shock. There is a big difference between educating people about a dangerous situation, and deliberately creating a climate of fear which far outweighs the reality. This is not the place to repeatedly beat a dead horse, just to keep calling attention to how awful it is that it died. This is, however, the place for acknowledging that the horse has died, and then figuring out what we're going to do about it. And finally, this is not the place for personal spats, petty disagreements, and "you said, I didn't say" types of arguments. I understand that with certain personality types it is inevitable for some discussions to deteriorate to that level, and we support your right to argue with whomever you choose. We do ask, however, that you take those things to Private Messenger if you feel the need to continue so that we can focus on the tasks at hand.

We want this forum to remain an open discussion group where all sides are heard, and we work very hard to avoiding censorship, and deleting comments that aren't spam. Revitalize Port Angeles is encouraging a zero tolerance policy on personal attacks, dead horse abuse, complaints for the sake of complaining, criticism of volunteers who are trying to DO something, and sensationalized, National Enquirer-type posts. Revitalize Port Angeles IS the place for changing the world, one small, beautiful town at a time!  

 

Editors' own addition - Revitalize Port Angeles is more than a Facebook page - it is a place to engage people who want to become more actively involved in improving their community.  We at Rotary are very excited to welcome Leslie and to learn how our Rotary Club might fit into this picture.  

Revitalize Port Angeles, and Leslie Kidwell Robertson 2015-08-16 07:00:00Z
Polio Update in Nigeria

NIGERIA GOES ONE YEAR WITHOUT A CASE OF POLIO

Polio Update in Nigeria Jessica Hernandez 2015-08-05 07:00:00Z
We are part of an international “family” as diverse, and as committed to peace and good will towards man as possible!
District 5020 Magazine
We are part of an international “family” as diverse, and as committed to peace and good will towards man as possible! Jessica Hernandez 2015-08-05 07:00:00Z
New Rotary Meeting Venue
New Rotary Meeting Venue Jessica Hernandez 2015-07-29 07:00:00Z
Clallam County Services for Adults with Disabilities/ Employing Adults with Disabilities
Mary Clifton, Clallam County Human Services serving those with disabilities, will share information about services and about how participants contribute to the community and local economy through work.  Mary will also share a short video clip from local employers as to the benefit of tapping into this often overlooked applicant pool and what workers with disabilities bring to their businesses.   The Clallam County website lists the following:  
Developmental Disabilities Advisory Committee

Mission Statement

  • To work to enhance inclusive choices for individuals with developmental disabilities,
  • To communicate with and make recommendations to the Board of County Commissioners, and
  • To achieve full integration, inclusion, equality and acceptance of individuals with developmental disabilities leading to productive participation in the community.
Clallam County Services for Adults with Disabilities/ Employing Adults with Disabilities Jody Moss 2015-07-29 07:00:00Z
Shelter Box
The global support from the Rotary International network is the cornerstone upon which ShelterBox is built.

In April 2000, the Rotary Club of Helston-Lizard in Cornwall, England adopted ShelterBox as its millennium project. Little did they know that it would become the largest Rotary club project in the world, responding to disasters and conflict across the globe and providing emergency shelter to over one million people.

Rotary has been instrumental in our growth and Rotarians are the cement that binds us together. Since ShelterBox was founded, we have grown from one club’s adopted project to Rotary International’s only Project Partner in disaster relief. 

The global Rotary network has been key in our international growth. At present, all ShelterBox affiliates have been set up by Rotarians or Rotaractors and the growth has been phenomenal.
 

In 2012, ShelterBox became Rotary International's first Project Partner and remians the only disaster relief charity. 

This agreement enables both organizations to collaborate more closely to bring relief and temporary shelter to survivors of disasters worldwide. The project partnership has built on both organization's strengths in responding to disasters all over the world. 

The benefits to both ShelterBox and Rotary are enormous. We receive incredible support from Rotary and, equally, we are acting as a catalyst in encouraging more people the world over to become involved with their local Rotary Club. ShelterBox can provide support as a club's international project via speakers and supplemental material. Plus, ShelterBox offers multiple youth opportunites for culture exchange and leadership training. (See panel at right for more info)


Rotary International's logistical support on ShelterBox deployments is just as critical as the generous financial support we receive from Rotarians and Clubs worldwide.

The fundraising efforts by Rotarians make up a significant proportion of donations received by ShelterBox. Alongside this, Rotary Clubs provide invaluable support to our field operations.

Rotarians will often be the people who ensure our aid can be delivered into a country by acting as consignees. These essential acts mean we can deliver aid to people in need as quickly as possible. 

More often than not, it will be Rotarians who are the first point of contact for the SRT members when they arrive in a country that has been devastated by a disaster. They provide everything from logistical support, translators, local knowledge, to a bed to sleep in.

Thanks to the support and generosity of Rotary International, ShelterBox is able to deliver dignity and hope to families in need around the world. 

Find out more about the extraordinary work of our project partner Rotary International, by visiting their website
Shelter Box Jody Moss 2015-07-23 07:00:00Z
Attorney General Visit
Fellow Rotarians - Please join us for this very special meeting.  Clearly from his website, Bob Ferguson is a friend of Rotary.  
 
Bob Ferguson is Washington's 18th Attorney General. As the state's chief legal officer, he directs 500 attorneys and 600 professional staff providing legal services to state agencies, Governor and Legislature.
General Ferguson’s ongoing priorities are:
  • Protecting consumers and seniors against fraud by cracking down on powerful interests that don’t play by the rules;
  • Keeping communities safer by supporting law enforcement;
  • Protecting our environment; and
  • Standing up for our veterans by advocating for service men and women and their families.
Bob received his J.D. from New York University School of Law in 1995. He earned a B.A. in Political Science from the University of Washington, where he was student body president. Bob began his legal career in Spokane where he served as a law clerk for Chief Judge W. Fremming Nielsen of the Federal District Court for Eastern Washington. He then clerked for Judge Myron Bright of the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals in the Midwest. Ferguson returned to Seattle and joined Preston, Gates, and Ellis (now K&L Gates), one of Washington's leading law firms.
In 2003, Bob was elected to the King County Council. In 2005, after the council was reduced from 13 to nine and Bob's district was eliminated, he was re-elected. He was unopposed in 2009.
Bob is a fourth-generation Washingtonian. His family homesteaded on the beautiful Skagit River, which may explain why Bob is such an enthusiastic mountain climber, backpacker, and birder. He has hiked hundreds of miles of Washington trails and climbed many of the state's highest peaks.
Bob is an internationally-rated chess master. His games have appeared in local, national and international chess publications. Bob has twice won the Washington State Chess Championship.
Bob, his wife Colleen and their 7-year-old twins, Jack and Katie, reside in the Maple Leaf neighborhood of North Seattle.
- See more at:
Bob Ferguson is Washington's 18th Attorney General. As the state's chief legal officer, he directs 500 attorneys and 600 professional staff providing legal services to state agencies, Governor and Legislature.
General Ferguson’s ongoing priorities are:
  • Protecting consumers and seniors against fraud by cracking down on powerful interests that don’t play by the rules;
  • Keeping communities safer by supporting law enforcement;
  • Protecting our environment; and
  • Standing up for our veterans by advocating for service men and women and their families.
Bob received his J.D. from New York University School of Law in 1995. He earned a B.A. in Political Science from the University of Washington, where he was student body president. Bob began his legal career in Spokane where he served as a law clerk for Chief Judge W. Fremming Nielsen of the Federal District Court for Eastern Washington. He then clerked for Judge Myron Bright of the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals in the Midwest. Ferguson returned to Seattle and joined Preston, Gates, and Ellis (now K&L Gates), one of Washington's leading law firms.
In 2003, Bob was elected to the King County Council. In 2005, after the council was reduced from 13 to nine and Bob's district was eliminated, he was re-elected. He was unopposed in 2009.
Bob is a fourth-generation Washingtonian. His family homesteaded on the beautiful Skagit River, which may explain why Bob is such an enthusiastic mountain climber, backpacker, and birder. He has hiked hundreds of miles of Washington trails and climbed many of the state's highest peaks.
Bob is an internationally-rated chess master. His games have appeared in local, national and international chess publications. Bob has twice won the Washington State Chess Championship.
Bob, his wife Colleen and their 7-year-old twins, Jack and Katie, reside in the Maple Leaf neighborhood of North Seattle.
Attorney General Visit Jody Moss 2015-07-08 07:00:00Z
Puppy Pilots!

RAISE A PUPPY, CHANGE A LIFE

Puppy Pilots is a puppy raiser club for Guide Dogs for the Blind. It covers the Sequim and Port Angeles, Washington area. Currently, we have 3 guide dog puppies-in-training. We are always looking for interested people to volunteer as puppy raisers, puppy sitters, fundraising, and promoters of our organization. We post our monthly training schedule on the meeting schedule page. If you are new and would like to visit our training, please contact Deb Cox at deb@puppypilots.org about specifics and further questions you may have. Thank you for your interest in this wonderful and fulfilling cause.

 

Puppy Raising

Puppy raising is a very rewarding experience and a wonderful contribution to Guide Dogs for the Blind.

Requirements to become a Guide Dog for the Blind puppy raiser:

  • Raisers must live in Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, Utah or Washington.
  • Potential raisers must have a home interview by a local representative.
  • All members of the household must be committed to raising puppy.
  • Raisers can be adults or youth at least 9 years of age.
  • The home in question must provide a safe and secure living environment for a puppy.
  • The puppy must sleep indoors.
  • As a puppy raiser, individuals must join a local puppy raising club and attend scheduled club meetings and outings.
  • Puppy raisers must be committed to providing exercise and socialization of their pup.
  • Puppy raisers are responsible for some expenses, including food and incidentals. Such expenses may be tax-deductible depending on state tax laws.
  • Puppy raisers must present positive representation of Guide Dogs for the Blind within their community.
  • For more information about Guide Dogs for the Blind, go online to www.guidedogs.com or call 1-800-295-4050
Puppy Pilots! 2015-04-01 00:00:00Z
OPNET
WELCOME! We have this weeks and last weeks bulliten in one! Thank you all for your patience while I figure out Club Runner! -Zoe Apisdorf
 
March 25th

Olympic Peninsula Narcotics Enforcement Team (OPNET)

 
 
 
The mission of the Olympic Peninsula Narcotics Enforcement Team is to target drug violators that have a major impact on our communities and to reduce drug availability and trafficking in Washington State and Clallam County and Jefferson County, thereby improving the quality of life in our area of responsibility.
 

Goals

Reduce the number of drug traffickers in the communities of Clallam County and Jefferson County through the professional investigation, apprehension, and conviction of drug traffickers.

Efficiently attack, disrupt, prosecute individual and organized mid to upper level drug traffickers who do not recognize jurisdictional boundaries or limitations, and by doing so, impact drug trafficking organizations previously impregnable.

Enhance drug enforcement cooperation and coordination through multi-agency investigations, support, training of local jurisdictions, and the sharing of resources and information.

To address these issues with the foremost consideration of safety for both law enforcement and the community.

OPNET 2015-03-23 00:00:00Z
News Briefs for the Week
Port Angeles Library staff to offer tech tutoring

PORT ANGELES — The North Olympic Library System is offering 30-minute appointments with expert library staff for hands-on, one-on-one tutoring on using e-readers, smartphones and tablet devices at the Port Angeles Library on Wednesdays throughout the summer. 

These free “tech-know-logy” sessions will take place by appointment only 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. today, June 10, July 1, July 22 and Aug. 12. 

Alternate appointment times are available upon request.

Participants should bring their devices and will be guided through the process of downloading e-books and e-audiobooks from services such as Washington Anytime Library, 3M Cloud Library, and OneClickDigital, as well as the library’s new instant streaming service.

NOLS staff can help with Kindles, Nooks, Android tablets or Apple devices, smartphones, laptops or MP3 players.

For those considering purchasing an e-reader or similar device, the technology tutors can help find more information.

For more information or to book a session, email ehelp@nols.org, visit www.nols.org or phone 360-417-8500.
 
Audubon speaker

SEQUIM — Author and Washington conservationist Dee Arntz will be the guest speaker at the Dungeness River Audubon Center at Railroad Bridge Park, 2151 W. Hendrickson Road, at 7 p.m. today.

Arntz will discuss her book, Mothers of Nature: Extraordinary Women Conservationists of Washington.

She will recount important stories of courageous women who earned many of Washington’s conservation successes, such as Polly Dyer and Emily Haig, who worked to expand Olympic National Park.

Copies of the book are for sale, and Arntz will autograph copies at the end of her presentation.

Also during the program: a summary of BirdFest 2015, a report by the nomination committee on officers for 2015-16, plus emerging results for BirdFest 2015.

The program is free and open to the public.

NAMI meeting

PORT ANGELES — A meeting of NAMI of Clallam County will be held in the Linkletter Room at Olympic Medical Center, 939 Caroline St., at 6:30 p.m. Thursday.

Following the meeting, there will be a presentation by Diane Lee Crawford, program manager of Morningside Community Rehabilitation, about collaborating with businesses, corporations, government and other local organizations.

Vic Entrikin, an employment consultant who works in the local office, also will participate.
 
Bake sale set

PORT ANGELES — The Answer For Youth (TAFY) will hold a bake sale at Swain’s General Store, 601 E. First St., from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. 

The sale helps support TAFY and its programs for homeless and at-risk youth and young families in the community.

State drought website is now available

PORT ANGELES — Washington State University Extension recently launched a new website to assist state residents and farmers with timely updates and water conservation tips during this projected dry year.

The new website http://drought.wsu.edu was developed by WSU Agricultural Weather Network Program (AgWeatherNet) and WSU Extension.

The website will provide farmers, ranchers, homeowners, foresters and the general public with research-based publications, updates, useful links, as well as news on drought-related issues. 

Topics include conservation tips for home and garden, irrigation management, forestry, crops and livestock.

The “Drought Basics” page helps residents understand what happens in a drought.

There’s also a Washington Drought Twitter feed, where you can sign up to follow updates, and a link to AgWeatherNet.

The current drought began last winter. 

For more information, visit http://drought.wsu.edu or www.weather.wsu.edu.

Chain gang busy

PORT ANGELES — The Clallam County Sheriff’s Office Chain Gang removed 220 pounds of brush, weeds and trash during the week of May 4.

About 1,920 scotch broom plants were removed from Okerman and Place Road pits, adding to the 2015 annual removal total of 12,617 plants.

Crews brushed and chipped 2 miles of the county right of way on Lower Elwha Road.

Class of 1965 reunion set in September

PORT ANGELES — The Class of 1965 Port Angeles High School Roughriders will celebrate its 50th reunion Friday and Saturday, Sept. 18-19.

Plans are being finalized for a Friday evening gathering at Peninsula Golf Course and Saturday evening gathering at the Red Lion Hotel.

For more information, email Ed Bedford at egbedford@wavecable.com or phone 360-808-5498.

 
News Briefs for the Week 2015-03-17 07:00:00Z
Students of the Month
ALEXANDER JOHN PARRILL and EMILY NICOLE BASDEN are our students of the month for March.  
Students of the Month Jessica Hernandez 2015-03-09 00:00:00Z
New Year Bar-B-Que

New Year Bar-B-Que!

 
 
Meeting at the Lincoln park Log cabin we will be having a barbeque to welcome in the new year! 
 
If you signed up to bring food or supplies thank you very much!
 
See you at noon for a lovely cook out!
 
 
 
New Year Bar-B-Que Zoe A 2015-03-08 08:00:00Z
Replacing classroom and library books in the Philippines
Are you familiar with the word serendipity? That certainly seems like what has happened for the Rotary Club of Kapolei Sunset, Hawaii.
 
We started the project to support libraries in the Philippines, but it has turned into a mission of hope and recovery for schools impacted by the devastation of Typhoon Haiyan. Our efforts coincided with Hawaii public schools replacing textbooks as they adapted to a changed curriculum. 
Replacing classroom and library books in the Philippines Charlene Santala Gearing, public relations chair, Rotary Club of Kapolei Sunset, Hawaii 2015-03-04 00:00:00Z
Reach Out and Read Washington
Reach Out and Read helps Washington’s youngest children be ready for kindergarten by partnering with doctors to prescribe books and encourage families to read together.  
 
Reach Out and Read doctors give young children new books and inspire families to read together, starting when children are babies. At each well-child checkup, medical providers teach parents how cuddling together and sharing books builds language and literacy skills that will help children be ready for school.
 
 
Reach Out and Read Washington Jody Moss 2015-02-25 00:00:00Z
Rotary International Foundation and PA Rotary Global Grant
Fellow Rotarian, Ann Murakami will present on the Rotary International Foundation and share information about the status of our planned Global Grant.  
Rotary International Foundation and PA Rotary Global Grant Jody Moss 2015-02-25 00:00:00Z
Rotary International Foundation and PA Rotary Global Grant
Fellow Rotarian, Ann Murakami will present on the Rotary International Foundation and share information about the status of our planned Global Grant.  
Rotary International Foundation and PA Rotary Global Grant Jody Moss 2015-02-25 00:00:00Z
Physician Recruitment
The Affordable Care Act has allowed many more individuals access to medical services, but comes with a drawback - now we do not have enough providers to serve the numbers of patients in our communities.  Eric Lewis or Scott Kennedy will speak about local recruitment efforts.  Below is an article from the Washington State Medical Association Reports on the topic of physician shortages.  
 
Looming shortage of physicians threatens patient access to care
By MARCIA FRELLICK, from November / December 2014 WSMA Reports
A national shortage of more than 45,000 primary care physicians looms just five years away, according to Association of American Medical Colleges predictions* and Washington is among the states feeling particular pressure to add family doctors, especially in rural areas.
Physician Recruitment Jody Moss 2015-02-18 00:00:00Z
Happy Bucks

Happy Bucks this week are for the Shelter Box! :) Come support emergency shelter in the face of disaster. 

Happy Bucks Arnold R. Grahl 2015-02-15 08:00:00Z
Students of the Month - February 2015
Audra Rose Perrizo: Her current GPA is 3.87 and she is ranked 21 out of 278 students.  Her honors include: Port Angeles High School (PAHS) Swim Team Most Inspirational Fall 2012; PAHS Varsity Swim Team; WIAA Division III Girl’s Swimming State Championships in 2012-2013; PAHS Girl’s Varsity Tennis, PAHS Academic Excellence award, PAHS Theodore Roosevelt Award, Naval Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (NJROTC) Citizenship Award, Violent Richardson Volunteer Award from the Jet Set Soroptomist, NJROTC Leadership Academy Honor Platoon. Her activities include: PAHS class officer, PAHS swim and dive captain, PAHS girls swim and dive team, PAHS swim and dive state, PAHS swim club, PAHS tennis, Impact Tournament Softball, North Olympic Softball 16U, NJROTC Drill Team and Color Guard, she volunteers at the lavender festival, Dungeness Crab Festival, Boys and Girls Club, Toys for Tots, IBC Christmas House, First Baptist Fall Festival, Teddy Bear Tea, Olympic Peninsula Senior Games, and IBC Vacation Bible Study.  She also works at Safeway.  Her special interests include: reading, writing, swimming, camping, hiking, travel, and spending time with family and friends.
 
Michael Helwick: His current GPA is 3.983, he is ranked 6th out of 271 students.  His honors are: He has received an academic letter and first bar, Soroptomist International Star Award in the Fine arts, All-Northwest Honors Orchestra in 2013, All-State Honors Orchestra in 2014, named NMSQT commended scholar, AP scholar, state Solo and Ensemble contest.  His activities are: Boy Scout in troop 1460 and has achieved the rank of Life Scout, plays bass in the Port Angeles Symphony and high school Chamber Orchestra, high school National Honor Society, and is a member of the Science Club.  His special interests are: Playing bass or guitar, he stands with a few jazz bands occasionally, he collects vinyl records, enjoys traveling the country with his family, and has been to all 48 contiguous states.
 
Silas Jedidiah Johnson: His GPA with Running Start is 3.8, Home School 4.0, and PAHS 3.84.  His class rank is 23 out of 271.  His honors are in Business Honors.  His activities are: Active in the FBLA where he was Vice President his Junior year and is President this year, he has qualified for state conference both years and plans on travelling to Nationals this year, last year he attended RYLA conference and learned valuable leadership skills, active member in the Juvenile Teen Court system taking roles of jury, judge, and bailiff, he has his letter at PAHS from the Judo Team, and has been active with the Clallam County Judo Club for the last 8 years, he has been active with the Christian club for the last 3 years, and has been taking piano lessons the last 10 years.  His special interests include: Playing piano, chemistry and chemical engineering, business, and medicine.
Students of the Month - February 2015 Jessica Hernandez 2015-02-11 00:00:00Z

Report From the Field

How do our huckleberry pancakes look to you? We are actually surviving the ride up many many mountain passes. Very tired each night, but actually having a lot of fun. Life is very simple on the road. It revolves around a lot if physical effort with food and setting up camp. We will arrive at the Columbia river today! Miss you guys- Steve and Deb


 

Report From the Field Stephen Moriarty 2014-09-24 00:00:00Z

Mission of the Clallam County Commissioners

Clallam County's Mission

Clallam County provides services as required by law or mandated by the public. Through effective management of personnel and other resources, the County strives to provide the basic facilities and programs, which promote health, safety, and quality of life for its citizens.

 

Our Strategic Goals

  • Provide for the safety and security of county citizens
  • Improve and protect public health
  • Protect the environment and quality of life
  • Maintain and enhance county transportation systems
  • Support economic growth
  • Implement the comprehensive land use plan
  • Provide recreational opportunities and facilities
  • Provide infrastructure to meet growth
  • Keep county government effective
  • Support the educational needs of county employees and provide educational outreach
  • Maintain a high level of customer service to citizens of Clallam County
  • Insure that state law mandates are carried out successfully and provide feedback to the state on the effectiveness of laws

  •  
Mission of the Clallam County Commissioners 2014-09-17 00:00:00Z

Fortune Cookie

Enjoy this message of inspiration.
 

 
 
Fortune Cookie Kwong Yue Yang 2014-09-17 00:00:00Z

Miami club reconnects with local scholarship recipients

Sean's Note: Our club gives out scholarships every year. This club in Miami takes it to a whole new level!

 

Ever think of finding 600+ needles in a haystack? The idea intrigued me and so I began the “reconnect” project in 2010 for the Rotary Club of Miami.

The Rotary Club of Miami awards scholarships to local high school graduates who are now attending medical school through the Thomas Brown McClelland Trust. The Trust was set up through an endowment established by Miami Rotarian Thomas Brown McClelland upon his passing in the early 1980s. It has since awarded over $6 million in scholarships. But no effort was ever made to reach out to former recipients to track their successes and explore opportunities within the network. Hoping to track the impact, I took on the task. 

140909_brodThe magic of the Internet

I found a list of scholarship recipients and decided to see what magic the Internet could conjure up! While it was time consuming, I knew that all the recipients were now doctors, which helped. Armed with their name, medical school attended, and graduation date, I was able to find more current contact information.

I tackled the list of contacts in small batches. An introductory letter was sent, along with a survey. It was rewarding to discover their many accomplishments and how significant the scholarship awards had been in building their career. Once contact information for all alumni had been collected, a newsletter was created to connect the community. Now, twice a year, the newsletter is sent to everyone and includes alumni updates and information about current award recipients.

The effort gave birth to a Thomas Brown McClelland Trust family and I am so thrilled to be a driving force behind it. As a bonus, over $28,000 has been contributed back to the Trust by former recipients seeking to support those following in their footsteps. The search for those 600+ needles was certainly worth the time and effort.


 
Miami club reconnects with local scholarship recipients Marcia Brod, a member of the Rotary Club of Miami 2014-09-17 00:00:00Z

Rotary Scholar helps the homeless through art

“You feel like you are on guard 24/7,” shared Scott Benner, a homeless individual in the Boston area.

Scott is one of the many homeless individuals who has shared with me the everyday dangers and fears that he faces. My friend Katie Hickey Schultz faced similar challenges during her 10 years of chronic homelessness. “I spent a long time fighting for my right to exist everywhere I went.” As a Rotary Scholar, my goal is to help individuals like Scott and Katie gain self-esteem and earn an income by selling their artwork.

I have worked with homeless and disabled individuals for the past eight years. From 2006-10, I worked one-on-one with homeless individuals and helped them secure housing, employment, and food stamps. After graduating from Harvard in 2010, I received a fellowship to start art groups in women’s homeless shelters in the Boston area.

From 2011-12, I received a global grant scholarship to study in Edinburgh, Scotland. I earned a masters creating social change documentaries and started an art show that focused on the amazing talents of homeless individuals.

Working with homeless artists as a Rotary Scholar was revolutionary for my growth as a social entrepreneur. In December of 2013, my brother Spencer Powers and I founded ArtLifting, an art gallery that features the work of homeless and disabled artists. By being on the ArtLifting platform, artists are emotionally empowered and have an opportunity to earn a stable income. ArtLifting’s impact has been featured in the Boston Globe, Bloomberg Businessweek (online), ABC local news, and the Huffington Post. Our mission is inspired by Rotary’s mission of Service Above Self.

Allen Chamberland, one of ArtLifting’s artists shared: “ArtLifting has done so much for me, it’s to the point now where this time next year I won’t have to be on disability anymore. I’ll be able to support myself, because of ArtLifting.” Allen has been wheelchair-bound for over a decade and suffers from chronic pain. His self-esteem and independence increased exponentially when people began focusing on his talents.

After successfully launching in Boston with savings on a shoestring budget, my brother and I decided to raise funds to expand. We partner with existing nonprofits on the ground in order to help their artists receive the professional gallery they deserve.


 
Rotary Scholar helps the homeless through art By Liz Powers 2014-09-10 00:00:00Z
Membership Month!
It's Membership Month. Let your friends and family know about #Rotary and invite them to visit your club as well as like our club's Facebook page!
 
Membership Month! 2014-08-13 00:00:00Z
5 Beginner Homebrewing Tips

Creating drinkable beer is as simple as making soup from a can or a pot of tea, but creating outstanding beer can require additional effort. The following five tips will help you easily improve extract brews without too much additional equipment, effort or expense. If you run into terms you’re unfamiliar with, head on over to the Homebrewopedia and brush up on your brewing vocabulary!

1. Fresh Ingredients

The importance of brewing with fresh ingredients cannot be overstated. The quality of homebrewed beer can only be as good as the quality of the ingredients going into the brew kettle.

Because extract brewing consists of only malt extract (as far as fermentables), it is particularly important to find quality malt extract that’s not past its prime. Avoid the bag of brown hop pellets, a dusty kit or over-the-hill yeast. Try to find the freshest ingredients available.

2. Chill Wort

It is common practice to instruct new extract brewers to pour their hot wort into a fermenter filled with cold water to cool it down to yeast pitching temperatures. You will no doubt still have drinkable beer when fermentation is complete, but you run the risk of oxidation, which can manifest itself as unfavorable off-flavors in the final product.

Instead, use an ice-bath to cool the hot wort down to about 70°F (21.1°C) before adding it to the cool water in the fermenter. This will reduce the chances of oxidation, and ultimately produce cleaner tasting beer.

When chilling with an ice batch, be careful not to let any water (or anything else for that matter) into the boil kettle as it can cause contamination. When the steam stops coming off the kettle, you can put the cover on, which will help prevent anything from getting into the wort that shouldn’t.

For more wort chilling techniques, visit the Intermediate section.

3. Tried-and-True Recipes

After your first batch of beer, it’s tempting to start concocting your own recipes. There is nothing wrong with creating your own recipe—in fact it can be one of the most rewarding processes of homebrewing—but it can be very beneficial to brew a few tried-and-true recipes before branching out on your own. Using recipes from a book, an issue of Zymurgy magazine or a kit will ensure a recipe has potential to turn out drinkable. Tested recipes also allow the brewer to focus on mastering the processes of brewing beer at home.

Check out the Homebrewopedia and homebrew recipe page for recipe ideas.

4. Late Extract Addition

Some extract brewers advocate adding half the called for malt extract during the last ten minutes of the boil. This technique is said to decrease the darkening of the malt extract, which can darken beer and affect the overall taste. This is particularly beneficial when brewing light-colored styles, like pale ales or pilsners. Hop utilization (the bitterness derived from the hops) may be slightly higher if altering a recipe that calls for all the extract to be added at the beginning of the boil. If conducting a partial mash, all the extract can be added at the end to achieve a similar outcome.

5. No-Rinse Sanitizer

This may seem like a silly technique for creating better beer, but do not underestimate the importance of sanitizing and the ease of a no-rinse sanitizer. Getting in the habit of sanitizing everything that comes into the contact with the wort/beer after the boil is crucial in ensuring your homebrews don’t become contaminated. Using something like Star San allows you to soak everything that needs to be sanitized and then use it without having to thoroughly rinse, unlike bleach. No-rinse sanitizer + spray bottle = effortless sanitizing.


 
5 Beginner Homebrewing Tips 2014-08-13 00:00:00Z
Fifth birthday and beyond

Beginning 23 June, Rotary will join 37 NGOs, non-profits, philanthropies and businesses in supporting the 5th Birthday and Beyond celebration that recognizes the leading role the U.S. government plays in improving children’s health worldwide.

And believe me, there is much to celebrate, especially the incredible improvement in childhood mortality rates over the past quarter century. Experts tell us that in 2014, six million fewer children will die before their fifth birthday than was the case 25 years ago.

In 1985 Rotary International took on the challenge of wiping polio from the face of the earth. In 1988 we were joined by the World Health Organization, UNICEF and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to launch the Global Polio Eradication Initiative. To date, the United States has been the most generous donor country to the initiative with total contributions of more than $2.4 billion.

When we advocate on behalf of polio eradication, we emphasize to our elected officials how effective our efforts have been and why it is so vitally important to finish the job now and make polio only the second human disease to be totally eliminated (smallpox was the first).

Since we began, polio cases have plummeted by more than 99 percent, from about 350,000 cases per year to fewer than 420 in 2013. Today, polio remains endemic to only three countries: Afghanistan, Nigeria, and Pakistan, although cases will continue to occur elsewhere until the wild poliovirus is stopped for good.

We also make clear to our elected leaders that we do not expect national governments alone to pay the freight. Rotary members worldwide have contributed more than $1.2 billion and countless volunteer hours to polio eradication. Currently, the Gates Foundation is matching two-to-one every dollar Rotary contributes to polio eradication up to $35 million a year through 2018.

Let’s make sure that every child in the world celebrates his or her fifth birthday protected for life against polio.


 
Fifth birthday and beyond John Hewko, Rotary International General Secretary 2014-06-25 00:00:00Z
8 tips for getting young people interested in your club

Nathaniel Smith and Kristin Post met on a walking tour of Dupont Circle, a lively neighborhood in Washington, D.C. That's where things got a little creepy -- in a ghoulish sort of way.

The Halloween-inspired walk featured ghost stories and neighborhood history. It also replaced a regular meeting of the Rotary Club of Dupont Circle Washington. It's just the kind of activity that can attract young people -- or the young at heart -- to Rotary.

"This type of club meeting not only shakes up the tradition-bound notions of Rotary, it also creates an event to show off our club to younger prospects," says Post, a founding member of the Dupont Circle club.

1. Organize interesting meetings

Post says her club has found that organizing at least two special meetings a year creates a unique experience for attracting new members and cements friendships among club members. Explore your community for activities that you can use to create a different kind of club experience.With help from the Eastern Suburbs Rotaract Club, members of the Rotary Club of Bondi Junction in New South Wales, Australia, organized a barbecue for the community.

2. Look at your traditions

Smith says newer generations aren't impressed by pomp and circumstance. He points to the Rotary Club of Crawley in Western Australia, whose membership is one of the fastest growing and most diverse. They no longer sing the national anthem or fine their members.

"Some tradition is important, but too much time spent on these rituals may prevent a younger member from feeling at home in your club," he adds.

3. Update how and where you talk about Rotary

When the Rotary Club of Bondi Junction started referring to itself as a "social enterprise that delivers social change," it saw an immediate uptick in interest from younger members. Choosing the right communication channels for your club is equally important, whether it's Facebook, LinkedIn, or your website.

"The trickiest part is keeping it updated, but this is also critical. If your presence on these sites becomes stagnant, you'll lose the opportunity to hook a younger audience," says Smith.

4. Examine your club dues

The Dupont Circle club decided to offer appetizers and a cash bar rather than a full meal at its meetings to keep dues affordable for young professionals. You might also consider offering reduced dues to younger members for their first year.

5. Provide alternatives to weekly attendance

"Attendance is another challenge," says Post. "Members in our club often travel for work, plus they have family or other personal commitments that vie for their time."

The Dupont Circle club makes make-ups easier by counting participation in service days, committee meetings, district trainings, and club social events.

6. Plan events that members can attend easily

In many urban areas, young people rely on public transportation to get around. Choose meeting locations with that in mind. And hold some events on the weekend so members with full-time jobs and young families can attend.

7. Involve young members early to build club loyalty

Involve new members in club projects right from the start. Seek their input. Give them responsibilities so they feel a sense of accomplishment and worth. And assign them mentors in the club to ensure that they feel valued.

8. Plan family-friendly projects and activities

Plan club meetings, service projects, and events that appeal to young families. For instance, the Dupont Circle club threw a baby shower to celebrate three upcoming births. The shower was held in a space that offered plenty of room for the children of other club members to play together.


 
8 tips for getting young people interested in your club 2014-06-25 00:00:00Z
First World Problems
This video helps us keep ourselves in check. Remember what seems like a big deal to us isn't usually a matter of basic health and safety, as it is for others around the world.
 

 
First World Problems YouTube 2014-06-17 00:00:00Z
Play dramatizes danger of not immunizing your children

In May, we held a special play to promote polio awareness in Shamsabad, Rawalpindi, with the help of the Pakistan National Polio Plus Committee and the Rawalpindi Arts Council.

The play portrays a young woman at an engagement party who becomes the laughing stock of the celebration when she cannot dance like the other young women. Her left leg is crippled from the effects of contracting polio as a child.

At the cruel remarks from her peers, the girl, Kiran, bursts into tears and proclaims “It is not my fault. My parents are responsible because they did not give me the polio vaccine. I can never live a normal life and cannot enjoy the company of friends. No one will marry me.”

Her mother tells the gathering that it is, indeed, her fault. “Please don’t ridicule my child. It is a burden on me, not on anyone else. But don’t repeat our mistake, give the polio vaccine to your children so they will not have to suffer in this way.”

The play ends with the boy who was set to be engaged to another woman choosing to marry Kiran instead, after overhearing the conversation.

The performance is aimed at sensitizing the audience to the dangers of polio, and the peril of not letting your children receive the vaccine. It is perhaps the first attempt to raise awareness in the city since the World Health Organization’s vaccination recommendations for travellers from polio-infected countries.

Our district governor handed out certificates to the artists following their fine performance of the play, written by the former resident director of the art council, Naheed Manzoor.

We would strongly encourage other clubs to find creative ways to promote polio awareness. Two drops of vaccine can protect a child for life. What can be more important than that?


 
Play dramatizes danger of not immunizing your children Nosherwan Khalil Khan 2014-06-17 00:00:00Z
Multi-club project honors D-Day veterans

In 2005, HonorAir founder Jeff Miller asked me to help realize his dream of taking all surviving American WWII vets to their national memorial in Washington D.C. What started as a small local project has now spread nationwide, thanks in no small part to many Rotary clubs that made it their own project.

About a year ago, Jeff had another dream. This time it was to take all surviving Normandy Invasion Campaign (D-Day) veterans to their national memorial for the 70th Anniversary Commemoration of D-Day. Through the partnership of the Asheville and Hendersonville Rotary clubs, a team was pulled together to turn this idea into a reality.National D-Day memorial in Bedford, Virginia, USA.

For nine months, this team of Rotarians has worked tirelessly to identify every surviving D-Day vet throughout western North Carolina, in hopes of loading them on two buses and taking them to the commemoration events in Bedford, Virginia, on 6 June. Rotary clubs throughout District 7670 have worked to find eligible vets as well as donated money to the project to ensure that the veterans and their spouses travel at no charge.

So what is my take away on this Rotary experience? Recently, I spent time with my family floating and camping down a local river. One morning as I sat on the riverbank watching the sun creep over the mountain tops, my mind drifted to the beauty surrounding me and the freedom I have to enjoy public lands and come and go as I please. It reminded me of the brave sacrifice of millions of soldiers, sailors, and airmen; the terrible cost of war; and the importance of working to build peace.

This Rotary project has given me perspective in ways I could never have imagined. In preparing a video As we talked, I viewed him in the same way I viewed my grandfather, full of wisdom and experience, a man to be respected.

In post-production a few days later, we found a photo of Mr. Murf with his squadron standing in front of their plane. A shiver ran down my spine as I saw this grandfatherly figure from a few days before in the form of a teenager, only a year or two older than my own kids. A young man with an entire life of dreams in front of him. He was one of the lucky ones; the ones that made it home to realize those dreams.

Multi-club project honors D-Day veterans Chris Burns, Rotary Club of Hendersonville, North Carolina, USA 2014-06-04 00:00:00Z
Lighting up Easter Island with an End Polio Now message

The gigantic, brooding monoliths of Easter Island have been impressing visitors to the remote island, 2,000 miles off the coast of Chile, for years. We [District 4349 of Chile] wanted to illuminate some of these statues with an End Polio Now message, but it proved to be no easy task.

The stone statues are known as moai, the living faces (aringa ora) of deified ancestors of the Rapa Nui who inhabited the island. The Dutch navigator Jacob Roggeveen came upon the statues on Easter Sunday in 1722. The island has several ceremonial platforms, called ahu, upon which statues are displayed, and each is associated with a family of nobility.

The construction of the moai was quite an event. They average 10 to 16 feet in height, and weigh about five tons, although some are as heavy as 10 tons. Archaeologists have registered more than 1,000 statues around the island.

Our goal was to light two of the 15 moai on Tongariki, the biggest ahu on the island located about 40 minutes from the town of Hanga Roa. The two figures we wanted to light are both unique, the second from the right is the only one with a hat, and the fifth from the right is the largest of the set.

But doing so is complicated. Besides the lack of electricity, the ahu are protected sacred sites. For our event, we needed authorization from the governor of Easter Island, the mayor of Hanga Roa, the National Corporation of Indigenous Development, and the senior council for the Rapa Nui.

On 6 May, permission and equipment secured, about 45 members of Rotary and 70 Rotary Youth Exchange Students from Chile, all wearing red End Polio Now T-shirts, traveled to the island and gathered in front of the Tongariki with local residents for our effort to raise awareness for polio eradication and publicize just how close we are to ending this disease.

Once everything was ready, we went to the ahu and sat down for the official picture. We finally made it!

Lighting up Easter Island with an End Polio Now message Roberto Manuel Silva Pérez 2014-05-28 00:00:00Z
Big $$ awarded at annual PA scholarship ceremony

(Port Angeles) – High honors last night for many graduating Port Angeles High School seniors.

More than two and a half million dollars in scholarships and grants were handed out during the annual awards ceremony.

Of that, more than 500-thousand dollars came from local organizations.

Several students received large endowments to attend prestigious schools including nearly full-ride scholarships to Harvard and Dartmouth.

Once again KONP broadcast the event live last night.

Big $$ awarded at annual PA scholarship ceremony KONP Radio 2014-05-28 00:00:00Z
Mark Your Calendars!
April is Magazine Month. Enjoy "The Rotarian!"
 
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Olympic Cellars Concert August 2
Mark Your Calendars! Jody Moss 2014-03-31 00:00:00Z