The Rotary Club of Estes Park

Club Information

Welcome to our Club!

Estes Park

Service Above Self

We meet Thursdays at 12:00 PM
New Location: Rodeway Inn
1701 North Lake Avenue
Estes Park, CO  80517
United States
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Officers And Directors
President
President Elect
Treasurer
Secretary
Sergeant-at-Arms
Past President
Club Administration
Community Service
Fund Development
International Service
Membership
Youth/New Generation Services
 
Home Page Stories
112
Happy 112th Birthday, Rotary!
 
 

On February 23, 1905, Paul P. Harris, Gustavus Loehr, Silvester Schiele, and Hiram E. Shorey gathered in Loehr’s Chicago office for what would become known as the first Rotary club meeting. Harris' desire for camaraderie among business associates brought together these four men and eventually led to an international organization of service and fellowship.

Rotary’s name came from the group’s early practice of rotating meetings among the offices of each member.
 
By July 1925, Rotary had grown to more than 2,000 clubs and an estimated 108,000 members on six continents. Rotary’s reputation attracted presidents, prime ministers, and a host of other luminaries to its ranks. As Rotary grew, members pooled their resources and used their talents to serve their communities. The organization's dedication to this ideal is best expressed in its motto, "Service Above Self."
 

Rotary now has 1.2 million members across the globe in more than 35,000 clubs.

Our club, The Rotary Club of Estes Park, was founded in 1926.

 

 
The first four Rotarians, from left: Gustavus Loehr, Silvester Schiele, Hiram Shorey and Paul P. Harris. Circa 1905-12.
 
Join the worker bees: 4th Thursday groups meet this week
 
Our club is so much more than a weekly meeting and lunch with friends! The real work of a club happens at the committee level, and this week's meeting will give everyone the chance to engage in this important work.
 
Following lunch and a brief business meeting, members will be asked to gather in groups related to their interests. Do you like to guide fundraising? Then join the Fund Development Committee meeting. Is your passion mentoring and encouraging the youth of today to become the leaders of tomorrow? Then, join the Youth/New Generations table. Maybe you have signed up to do so much, like so many club members, that you'll have to bounce between tables.
 
You can see what you indicated as your area of interest at the bottom of your Spoke every week. But, fear not! It's never too late to join in, try something new, or simply "shop" for a group.
 
Here are the club members who will lead the small group work at Thursday's meeting:
 
Dave Evans - International Service
Dmitri Galcovski - Youth/New Generation Services
Karen Thompson - Fund Development
Karol Rinehart - Club Administration
Randy Skeie - Sargeant-at-Arms
Rick Taylor - Programs
Scott Thompson - Membership
Roger Thorp - Community Service
 
Bring your energy, your ideas and your willingness to help the Rotary Club of Estes Park be a better club for all its members.
 
The Fourth Thursday committee meetings are also scheduled for March 23, April 27 and May 25. You can make a difference! 
 
 
Roger Thorp led the Community Service Committee at the January Fourth Thursday session.
 
 
Rotary Quote of the Week
 

“No one can see the future. No one knows what changes lie ahead. But I have faith in Rotary, and in Rotarians, that with every passing year, you will make our world a better place through Rotary Serving Humanity." 

         ~John F. Germ, 2016-17 President, Rotary International, on the 112th  anniversary of the founding of Rotary on February 23, 1905.

Estes Park Environmental Center Executive Director Melinda Merrill to speak on Feb. 16
 
Melinda Merrill, Executive Director of the Estes Park Environmental Center, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Feb. 16, at their regular noon meeting. EPMC is a nonprofit organization devoted to impacting conservation efforts by facilitating collaboration opportunities and citizen science outreach.
 
Merrill will review the regional and international conferences that Estes Park Environmental Center has sponsored, in partnership with conservation groups, Rocky Mountain National Park, and the National Park Service. In addition, she will explain the Center’s educational monitoring programs, which include school districts, pre-service teachers, and national travel groups.  She will emphasize the stewardship work in which we can all participate. Merrill developed a citizen science program that uses environmental monitoring to help agencies manage and gain insight into difficult environmental issues. 
 
Melinda Merrill
 
The Man and the Biosphere Program of United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has become a programming emphasis, with UNESCO acknowledging their work in assisting with collaborations and information communications on this program. In particular, Merrill will explain the Know Your Biosphere Lecture Series and the the associated video being developed.
 
Furthermore, she will highlight two art shows, one for the Rocky Mountain National Park centennial and the other for the National Park Service Centennial. 
 
Merrill earned a Master of Science in Teaching and Leadership with an emphasis in Gifted Education from the University of Kansas with undergraduate degrees from St. Mary’s University and Colorado State University. She taught science to gifted and highly gifted students from Grades 6 - 10, as well as high school environmental science.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world.  There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas.  Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century.  Rotary clubs, around the world, initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road.  Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend.  Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
Logs for today, trees for tomorrow
Jim White to present Feb. 9 program 
 
Jim White, who worked in the lumber industry, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Feb. 9, at their regular noon meeting. He will discuss sustainable logging practices as practiced in the redwood lumber industry 1949-1956.
 
Club member Jim White
 
After serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II, White graduated from the University of Michigan in 1950 with a degree in wood technology.  He founded a wholesale lumber distribution business, Jim White Lumber Sales, in 1950.  After retiring in 1982, Jim and his wife Joanne moved to their vacation home in Estes Park in 1985. They have three daughters, six grandchildren, and two great grandchildren, all living within one hour of Estes Park. Jim served as a director and officer of the Estes Valley Land Trust (EVLT) for 25 years, retiring from EVLT in 2015.
 
 
Feb. 2 program to feature Realities for Children president
 
Craig Secher
 
The mission of Realities for Children Charities is to create a world-class model of collaboration in Larimer County by building a Realities for Children Homebase Facility and Youth Activities Campus. This facility will unite the 31 non-profit affiliate agencies and better the healing path to recovery for children that have been abused, neglected or are at-risk.
 
Realities for Children Charities has been recognized in human services, business and government sectors, including being twice recognized as the Charity of Choice in Colorado, receiving the E-chievement Award by National Public Radio and a Congressional Leadership Award.
 
Craig Secher, President of Realities for Children Charities, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, February 2, at their regular noon meeting.  Secher’s program will review this unique organizational model which has built a private-social partnership between the non-profit and for-profit communities that is dedicated to seeing that no child in need is forgotten.
 
Secher graduated from the University of Wisconsin Stevens Point with a degree in psychology with an emphasis on human services.  He worked in the child protection field in Larimer County, including work as a Child Protection Ongoing Case Manager with the Larimer County Department of Human Services before founding Realities for Children.  For 27 years, Secher has been serving the needs of children that have been abused, neglected or are at-risk in Larimer County. In his role as President of the charity, he is responsible for Affiliate Youth Agency partnerships and emergency fund allocations.
 
Among numerous accolades, Secher has been featured as a TedX presenter and has been awarded the My Day I Survived award from Child Protection Services, the Distinguished Community Partner Award form Lutheran Family Services, and the Outstanding Young Coloradan by the Colorado Junior Chamber of Commerce. 
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world.  There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34, just west of Dry Gulch Road. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
Fourth Thursday committee work to debut this week
 
Our club is so much more than a weekly meeting and lunch with friends! The real work of a club happens at the committee level, and this week's meeting will give everyone the chance to engage in this important work.
 
Following lunch and a brief business meeting, members will be asked to gather in groups related to their interests. Do you like to guide fundraising? Then join the Fund Development Committee meeting. Is your passion mentoring and encouraging the youth of today to become the leaders of tomorrow? Then, join the Youth/New Generations table. Maybe you have signed up to do so much, like so many club members, that you'll have to bounce between tables.
 
You can see what you indicated as your area of interest at the bottom of your Spoke every week. But, fear not! It's never too late to join in, try something new, or simply "shop" for a group.
 
Here are the club members who will lead the small group work at Thursday's meeting:
 
Dave Evans - International Service
Dmitri Galcovski - Youth/New Generation Services
Kathy Groesbeck - Fund Development
Karol Rinehart - Club Administration
Randy Skeie - Sargeant-at-Arms
Rick Taylor - Programs
Scott Thompson - Membership
Roger Thorp - Community Service
 
Bring your energy, your ideas and your willingness to help the Rotary Club of Estes Park be a better club for all its members.
 
The fourth Thursday committee meetings are also scheduled for February 23, March 23, April 27 and May 25. You can make a difference! 
 
Fund Development Committee at our last Club Assembly
 
YMCA Director DeLuca to present Jan. 19 program
 
Dave DeLuca, Center Director and Managing Director of the Estes Park Center of the YMCA, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Jan. 19, at their regular noon meeting. He will share information about the history to the YMCA of the Rockies and its current operations, speak about the YMCA’s many connections to the local community, and discuss the challenges faced by the Estes Park Center.
 
The DeLuca Family
 
The Estes Park Center is the largest YMCA conference and family center in the world.  The Estes Park Center and Snow Mountain Ranch (located near Granby, Colorado) are the two operating units of the YMCA of the Rockies. Combined, the two centers serve more than 220,000 guests per year.
 
De Luca  has spend more than thirty years working for the YMCA, mostly in the resident camping field. He has served as the director of Camp Abenaki (Burlington, Vermont), Camp Becket (western Massachusetts), and as the CEO of YMCA Camp Mason (New Jersey). He took his current position at the Estes Park Center on October 2014.
 
Dave and his wife Laurie live here in Estes Park and have enjoyed the transition to Colorado. Their two daughters visit regularly.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs, around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
Jan. 12 Program: focus on Estes Park fire services 
 

David Wolf, Fire Chief for the Estes Valley Fire Protection District, will present our program on Thursday, Jan. 12. As chief, Wolf is responsible for guiding the district toward its mission of providivg the citizens and visitors to the Estes Valley with superior fire prevention, fire protection, and emergency services in a safe and efficient manner.

"We accomplish this with a combination department that includes five full-time staff and 43 volunteers. Our primary response district has grown well beyond the boundary of the Town of Estes Park, and encompassing 66 sq. miles," Wolf explains. "The District also provides mutual aid to neighboring departments in Allenspark, Pinewood Springs, Big Thompson, and Glen Haven, as well as Rocky Mountain National Park. First as the Estes Park Fire Department (1907-2010) and now as the Fire District, the organization’s success is the result of countless dedicated volunteers committed to serving their community."

Wolf's presentation will serve two roles. First, he will give some background and updates on the Fire District’s state and short term future plans. Second, he will discuss the role that citizens play in fire prevention to reduce both their risk and the risk of the community.

"Fire prevention is a key part of our mission, and the most effective way to reduce the risk of incidents and minimize the impact of incidents that do happen," Wolf said. "We will review a few key tips for ensuring your own home is protected, including: understanding fire restrictions, home smoke detectors, carbon monoxide detectors, and wildfire defensible space.


David Wolf, EVFPD Chief

Before assuming his role with the EVFPD in June 2016, Wolf spent 15 years as a volunteer firefighter in Pennsylvania, New York, and Texas. He earned a B.S. in from Allegheny College, a M.S. from Washington State University, and a Ph.D. from Cornell University, all in geology. He worked for an international oil & gas company in Houston for six years as a research scientist and exploration geologist. While a full time graduate student, David also worked as a State Fire Instructor in New York. Once in Houston, he served the 600 member Cy-Fair Fire Department as a station officer, board member, and ultimately managed the department’s fire training program for 350 volunteers.

Please join the Rotary Club of Estes Park in welcoming David Wolf on Jan. 12.

 
 Jan. 5 Meeting Cancelled due to Weather Conditions
 
What’s Your Plan? Advance directives and why they're important
 
This week's program will feature Mindy Rickard, Larimer Advance Care Plan Team Lead. She will discuss “What’s Your Plan? How can you have a say in your end-of-life care?"  Her presentation will cover such questions as: Who would make your medical decisions if you were unable to speak for yourself? 
 
Mindy Rickard
 
"Learn how to put a plan in writing and to effectively communicate your plan with your loved ones and the medical community," Rickard said. 
 
The Larimer Advance Care Planning Team can guide individuals 18 years and older at no cost in the process of completing their advance directives.
 
Dec. 15 program: The distance between getting by and going under
 
Crossroads Ministry of Estes Park has served the Estes community since 1982, following the Lawn Lake flood. Crossroads began as a food pantry, established by the St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church, and was eventually sponsored by the Estes Valley Interfaith Council. In addition to food assistance, Crossroads provides additional emergency services in rent/housing, utility assistance, help with medical expenses, transportation and other basic human needs.
 
In addition to addressing an immediate crisis, case managers encourage clients to remain self-sufficient and assist in setting goals, money management and finding resources for employment. Also, Crossroads has been instrumental in supporting residents with recovery from the 2013 flood.
 
The Reverend Doctor Tim McLemore, Executive Director of Crossroads Ministry of Estes Park, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park Thursday, Dec. 15, at their regular noon meeting. He will provide information about the ways Crossroads helps persons in need in our community and ways for others to help make a difference.
 
Dr. Tim McLemore
 
Dr. McLemore earned a B.A. in Bible summa cum laude from Mt. Vernon Bible College in Ohio, the Master of Divinity at Perkins School of Theology, and the Doctor of Ministry degree at Iliff School of Theology in Denver.  McLemore has been an ordained United Methodist clergyperson for 30 years, serving as pastor of local congregations in North Texas for 25 years and at Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University in Dallas for 5 years. In May 2015, McLemore accepted an invitation to serve as Executive Director of Crossroads Ministry of Estes Park.
 
Tim’s first career was as a professional musician, including four years with the U.S. Air Force field bands in Shreveport, LA, and in the Panama Canal Zone.  His primary musical instruments include piano, guitar electric bass, and clarinet, and he is currently playing bass with local band, Elk Hollow. Tim’s wife, Nancy McLemore, is Association Executive for the Estes Park Board of Realtors.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
Harmony CEO Dorman will be Dec. 8 speaker
 
Harmony Foundation is one of the longest running and most respected residential drug and alcohol treatment centers in the country. Addressing the pressing health and social concerns of addiction in a serene mountain setting is Harmony’s mission.
 
Despite its longevity and excellent reputation, many Estes Park residents are not aware of Harmony Foundation and what they do. For many years that was intentional in order to protect the confidentiality of their clients. While Harmony still values and supports confidentiality, they recognize the need to come out of the shadows and talk about alcoholism and drug addiction openly and publicly. 
 
Dorothy “Dot” Dorman, Chief Executive Officer of the Harmony Foundation, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Dec. 8, at their regular noon meeting. She will review the impact of addiction on society and the very painful and personal impact on individuals and their families. In particular, she will focus on the help and hope offered by Harmony and other treatment centers.
 
Dorothy Dorman, Harmony Foundation Chief Executive Officer
 
Combining her business, computer and personal relations skills, Ms. Dorman led the Accounting, Human Resources and Computer Technology Departments of Harmony for over 20 years. She served as Chief Financial Officer prior to being promoted to Chief Executive Officer in 2009. All of the positions that Dorman has held at Harmony Foundation have enabled her to fulfill her passion to help families dealing with addiction issues. In the time that she has been with Harmony, she estimates that more than 20,000 individuals have sought treatment there. 
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs, around the world, initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
 
Welcome to December! Mountain Echoes Choir to entertain this week
 
 
It is the season to carol, to sing our holiday songs.
 
To help us get into the holiday mood, Mountain Echoes, a student choir, will sing at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, December 1, at their regular noon meeting. Mountain Echoes is an after-school choir for students in Grades 3-5 at the Estes Park Elementary School. Mountain Echoes is directed by Mrs. Jenna Williams and accompanied by Mr. Mike Williams. 
 
Mountain Echoes sang holiday songs for the Estes Park Tree Lighting Ceremony this year. They have sung the national anthem for the boys’ varsity basketball game and were chosen to sing the national anthem at a Rockies baseball game last year. In addition, they will be singing at the elementary school Christmas Sing-Along in December. 
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park. Please note that parents and friends of the students are more than welcome to attend and enjoy the performance. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
This week's program: Wellness Center update
 
The Estes Park Medical Center (EPMC) plans to build a destination Wellness Center on Lot 4 on The Stanley campus here in Estes Park.  This project will require raising $8 million through a capital campaign to fund construction and startup costs. The Wellness Center is designed to be an economic driver for Estes Park tourism as well as an additional service line for the Medical Center, our local independent hospital.
 
Kevin Mullin, the Executive Director of the EPMC Foundation, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, November 17, at their regular noon meeting. The EPMC Foundation is the fundraising arm of the EPMC and the lead agency for the capital campaign.  Mullen will provide information about the project, and its benefits will be shared with Rotarians. 
 
Kevin Mullin
 
Mullin has served at The EPMC Foundation since March 2016 and brings over 20 years of experience in nonprofit management and fundraising.  Additionally, he has a Master of Nonprofit Management degree and has held leadership positions in organizations such as the American Red Cross, The Salvation Army and the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century.  Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend.  Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
 Building community with our immigrant neighbors
 
How can we, as a community, communicate with our immigrant neighbors? How can we get “past the doorways and into the kitchens”—the heart and soul of the lives of our immigrant neighbors?
 
Leonor Kennell, the Estes Valley Library English Language Learning Outreach Coordinator and parent educator for Spanish-speaking families for EVICS (Estes Valley Investment in Childhood Success), will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Nov. 10, at the regular noon meeting. 
 
Kennell plans to summarize the Estes Valley Library’s efforts to reach out to English language learners and immigrants that live in our community, through current and future programming and acquisition of appropriate materials. In addition, she will highlight the library’s partnership with Intercambio, a program based in Boulder which provides materials for English language learning. Finally, she hopes to communicate how we can go beyond the typical programming and events that we do in our community.
 
With over 30 years of teaching experience in a variety of regular, special education and bilingual programs, Kennell also coordinated an adult education program, in collaboration with the National Institute for Adult Education of Mexico, which provided the opportunity for adults from Mexico to complete their primary and secondary education. The majority of her professional experience has involved working with young immigrant children and their families, which prepared her well for her current role.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
Nov. 3 meeting to be held at The Stanley
 
This week's meeting of the Rotary Club of Estes Park will be held at The Stanley Hotel. It will start at the usual time, 11:30 a.m., with lunch, compliments of the hotel management. We will meet in the Concert Hall, the building next to The Lodge.
 
The program's presenters will update us on what's new at The Stanley and share plans for the iconic hotel's future. Don't miss this chance to hear from the hotel's general manager and Marnie Cullen, owner John Cullen's sister.
 
 
Now, here's the important part. You need to contact Karol Rinehart, club administator, to let her know:
  • if you are coming to The Stanley, and
  • if you are bringing a guest.
We need a head count for meal preparation.
 
Please email Karol by Tuesday at: 
 
 kj.rinehart@centurylink.net
 
 
Thursday's program: Chase the Music
 
Founder Clark Hodge

Chase the Music has original music composed and performed for children battling critical illness. The impact of Chase the Music programs begins with the child. The magical gift of a personal commissioned piece of music is like no other. It is unique and created just for that child.  

Clark Hodge, Founder and Executive Director of Chase the Music, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, October 27, at their regular noon meeting. In 2011, Hodge conceived the concepts behind Chase the Music. He has delivered a number of pieces of music for critically ill children and he will be sharing some of this music with us.

He has dedicated his life to ensuring that Chase the Music impacts as many people as possible. He encourages everyone to Chase the Music and to never stop smiling.

Married and with two grown boys, he finds pleasure in the outdoors, in music, and in community. He has been an organizer behind multiple Guinness World Records.

Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century  Rotary clubs, around the world, initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.

The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park. Please note our new Rotary location. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m.

Scholarship fund grows, thanks to Shred-a-Thon
 
 
Saturday's Shred-a-Thon was a successful community service and fundraising event. Thank you to the following people who helped: Trudy Collar, Karen Thompson, Thor Homme, Jim Austin, Jack Boatman, Dave Evans, Madison Casey, Ken TeSelle, Wayne Andersen, Scott Thompson, Bill Smith, Gordon Slack and Phil Moenning. Marty Casey provided the delicious Cinnamon rolls and sticky buns!  Yummy! And, the boys--the Thompsons' goldens and Trudy's Palmer (not pictured).

We will clear over $1,600 this time for our scholarship fund. 
 
Great day and great crew.

Tara
Rene Moquin to discuss his Cuba trip Oct. 20 
 
 
Rene Moquin will be our speaker on Thursday, Oct. 20. He will describe his recent service trip to Cuba, partially funded with a grant from our club. 
 
Rene was born and raised in Vermont. Following high school graduation, he went West to receive his BS degree from Northern Arizona University in Political Science and Finance. He then joined International Voluntary Services to work with refugees in South Vietnam for two years. Upon his return from IVS, he secured his masters from Arizona State University and later completed the Executive Management Program at Harvard University. His career includes managing charitable foundations for nearly 30 years; serving as Regional Director for the United States Tennis Association for two years, and serving as an interim director for different non profits. He also served as an adjunct professor of social policy at UTA and TCU.
 
Joanne and Rene moved to Estes Park, Colorado in 1994. He enjoys community theater, hiking, pickle ball, traveling, time at the gym, and reading. He plays in the local Village Band and sings with the Oratorio Society. He has volunteered with international community development projects in Africa, Central America, Poland and most recently in Cuba. And, of course, we know him better as the Big Duck for the 2016 Duck Race.
 
His life’s philosophy is based on the following statement: “None of us can save the world alone, but each of us can do something”.
 
 
Oct. 13 program to feature new Land Trust Director
 
Jeffrey Boring, Executive Director of the Estes Valley Land Trust since May 2016, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, October 13, at their regular noon meeting. His presentation will focus on the history of the organization, the role the community plays in land protection and stewardship, and future projects the land trust is currently working on. 
 
Jeffrey Boring and his wife, Emily Patterson
 
The Estes Valley Land Trust, accredited in 2008, was formed to preserve open space for future generations. EVLT preserves and protects open space, valleys, wetlands, streams, ranch lands and wildlife habitat in the Estes Valley and surrounding area. Currently, EVLT has over 9600 acres under protection through 159 conservation easements.
 
A conservation easement is a mechanism by which property owners who want to ensure the land that they own is protected from future development can voluntarily enter a legal agreement with a land trust. This agreement permanently restricts certain aspects of land use in order to protect the conservation values of the property. 
 
Boring’s work in the conservation field began 18 years ago with The Nature Conservancy in Georgia, helping to direct a land protection campaign that targeted land acquisition along the 180 mile Chattahoochee River. 
 
After completing his master’s degree in Conservation Ecology, Jeffrey served as the Director of Conservation at Athens Land Trust, before moving to Colorado in 2004 to manage a water quality monitoring program for the Big Thompson Watershed Forum. For the past 8 years, he served as an Open Lands Resource Specialist in the Larimer County Natural Resources Department.  
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road.  Please note our new Rotary location. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
Youth/New Generations to be featured in Oct. 6 program
 
This week's program will put our Youth and New Generations directorship in the spotlight. Dmitri Galcovski, Youth and New Generations Director, and Sue Fereday, Exchange Program Coordinator, will present an overview of our club's work with local teens who have leadership potential. The youth committee oversees the exchange student program and RYLA (Rotary Youth Leadership Awards), two valuable opportunity for youth to grow in leadership, meet teens from the region, and travel abroad. Dmitri will share some You Tube videos that show/discuss the RYLA program from the participants' point of view.   
 
"We will discuss the challenges both of these programs are facing as well," he said.

Sept. 22 program: free enterprise, freedom's imperative by Bill Marshall

Bill Marshall, a retired Fortune 250 company treasurer and writer, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, September 22, at their regular noon meeting. His program will focus on rediscovering free enterprise, freedom’s imperative.  Please note the change in location for Rotary Club meetings.
 
Bill Marshall
According to Marshall, rediscovering free enterprise will enliven your cocktail conversation as it reveals three original insights challenging accepted wisdom on the source of freedom. His insights derive from three overlooked questions: (1) What is the difference between capitalism and free enterprise?  (2) What is the primary purpose of free enterprise?  Hint:  It is not making money.  (3) What is the fault in the practice of free enterprise, which is based originally on the writings of America’s other founding father in 1776?  He feels that this “defect” in the practice of free enterprise is the root cause of income inequality and wealth disparity in America today.
 
Marshall poses one more question, “what really is America’s economic policy?”  He believes that rediscovering free enterprise is imperative to our freedom and that of future generations.
 
Now retired, Bill Marshall was the Treasurer of Nalco Chemical Company, a Fortune 250 industrial company specializing in global water treatment. He is a former Navy Lieutenant, Naval Flight Officer and Mission Commander. He is a Distinguished Eagle Scout. Bill earned a degree in industrial engineering from LeHigh University, studied business at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, and is a graduate of the Advanced Management Program of the Harvard Business School. He is married, lives in Estes Park, and has one daughter, an equine veterinarian.
 
Marshall has written two books, Rich Shareowner, Poor Shareowner and Money Ain’t Free, both of which were selected among the year’s top investment books by “Stock Trader’s Almanac.” He is completing a third book, Rediscovering Free Enterprise:  Freedom’s Imperative.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road.  Please note our new Rotary location.  Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend.  Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
 
Shred-a-Thon Saturday: show up, clean up, help students
 
Is it weighing you down? Keeping you from having a clean office, a neat desk or a clutter-free storage room? Tired of feeding papers to your puny shredder, three sheets at a time? The Rotary Club of Estes Park can help you reach those paper-free goals!
 
Come and contribute your excess paperwork at the Estes Park Rotary Club Shred-a-Thon on Saturday, October 15. You can drop off your items between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. or until the truck is full. Just drive to the Event Center parking lot off of Manford Avenue in Estes Park.
 
“Community shred days are part of our commitment to the prevention of identity theft and our support for recycling,” said Tara Moenning, event coordinator.
 
Items appropriate for shredding are:
  • Old bank statements,
  • Credit card offers,
  • Cancelled checks,
  • Old medical records,
  • Paycheck stubs, or
  • Anything with your personal information.
Clips, staples, and binders do not need to be removed.
 
While there is no charge, a generous donation would be appreciated, Moenning notes. The Rotary Club sponsors the cost of the truck so that all tax-deductible, donated funds will benefit the club’s scholarship program.
 
If you can’t be there on October 15, a club member will pick up your items. Call Tara Moenning, 970-577-0186 for information on pick up.
 
 

Our Sept. 15 program: fighting weekend hunger


Terry Leija

Terry Leija, teacher and outgoing president of the Estes Park Education Association, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, September 15, at their regular noon meeting. He will discuss efforts by EPEA to combat food insecurity and hunger in Estes Park students. Please note the change in location for Rotary Club meetings.

During the 2015-2016 school year, EPEA started the Estes Pak program, a supplemental food program. EPEA provides meals for students and families who need food on weekends throughout the school year. Leija has served as coordinator of the program.  

Leija is a second grade teacher at the Estes Park Elementary School. He has taught in Estes Park for over 20 years.

The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road. Please note our new Rotary location. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend.  Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 

 
9/8

Sept. 8 program to feature Visit Estes Park CEO

President and CEO of Visit Estes Park Elizabeth Fogarty will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Sept. 8, at their regular noon meeting.  She will discuss Visit Estes Park, a destination marketing organization, and how it supports tourism in our community.  Please note the change in location for Rotary Club meetings.
 
 
Fogarty will share how Visit Estes Park supports Estes Park’s economic vitality through tourism marketing, destination product development, event promotion, and community partnerships. Visit Estes Park is a data-driven, research-based organization which develops and executes strategies to enhance the quality of life for our residents and supports a year-round economy for our community.
 
Elizabeth was Vice President of Operations at Estes Park Condos from 2005–2013, while also participating with the Estes Park Wedding Association, Estes Valley Partners for Commerce, and Project Manager of the Estes Park Winter Festival 2010-2013. Elizabeth was the recipient of “Volunteer of the Year” for Estes Park in 2011.
 
Currently, Elizabeth is Vice President of the Estes Area Lodging Association, Larimer County Small Business Development Center Consultant, and Executive Board Member of the Estes Park Economic Development Corp.  Other committees include Town of Estes Park Events Committee, Wellness Committee, and Colorado Tourism Office Travel Resources Marketing Committee.
 
Participation with the organization began as a founding board member of the Local Marketing District Board in 2009 and involvement with Visit Estes Park’s Branding, Logo, Website and Marketing Committees. She has been President and CEO of Visit Estes Park since 2014. 
 
 
9/1
Learn how Estes Valley Legacy links donors to charities on Sept. 1
 
Jerry Kennell, Administrator of Estes Valley Legacy, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, September 1, at their regular noon meeting. He will discuss this important and innovative program. Please note the change in location for Rotary Club meetings.
 
 
While serving on the board of the Estes Park Nonprofit Resource Center, Kennell envisioned the need and opportunity for Estes Valley nonprofits to collaborate on a  program of education and marketing of planned and estate giving for donors in the Estes Valley. Estes Valley Legacy, a collaborative effort that now includes 15 leading area nonprofits, was founded in 2014 as a program of the Estes Park Nonprofit Resource Center. 
 
Kennell has over 40 years of experience in nonprofit leadership and fundraising. He was in service to three nonprofit organizations as executive director, to two fundraising consulting firms as founder and principal, and to the western region of a nationwide charitable and financial services firm as managing director. Furthermore, he worked as a member of the president’s staff at New York University and as vice president for advancement at a Midwestern liberal arts college. In addition, he served as the Development Officer for our Estes Valley Library and as board member and officer for numerous nonprofit and civic organizations.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road.  Please note our new Rotary location.  Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend.  Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
 Mental health needs in Larimer County to be topic of Thursday's program
 
This week's program will provide insight into a proposed Mental Health, Detox/Substance Abuse Facility. Our speaker will be Cheryl Olson, a Fort Collins native, who is is co-chair of People for a Healthier Larimer County. She served as a Larimer County Commissioner from 1997-2001, including three years as chair. She also led the steering committee for the community-wide Mental Health and Substance Abuse Planning Project from 2001 to 2012.
Olson is active in the Fort Collins real estate community. She referees regularly for the Larimer County Board of Equalization and is the endowment fund chair for SummitStone Health Partners. Cheryl has been active in the Fort Collins Chamber of Commerce; Fort Collins Board of Realtors; Colorado Association of Realtors; National Association of Realtors; Colorado Association of Commerce & Industry; and the local Republican Party.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world.  There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas.  Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century.  Rotary clubs around the world, initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park's events include “It’s Showtime!” and the annual Golf Tournament, which raise funds for scholarships awarded each spring to graduating seniors. The largest effort of the club is the annual Duck Race, which generated over $117,000 for 64 area charities in 2016. The club also awards community grants annually to area non-profits. The Club of Estes Park welcomes new members. For more information, visit rotaryclubofestespark.org, or come to a meeting. 
 
 

D.G. Redder to visit Estes Park Rotary Club

Barbara Redder, Governor of Rotary District 5440, will speak at the regular meeting of the Estes Park Rotary Club at noon on Thursday, Aug. 18,  at the National Park Theater, in the lower level of the Other Side Restaurant in Estes Park. Her district includes 54 Rotary clubs in Wyoming, Northwern Colorado, Eastern Idaho and Western Nebraska.
 
The International Rotary theme for the year is Rotary Serving Humanity!  DG Barb is expected to focus on growing Rotary’s contributions to humanity. The theme is meant to put focus on all the projects that the Rotary Club of Estes Park accomplishes, both locally and internationally. Opportunities are plentiful for potential members, young and old, to help Rotary achieve its mission of “peace and understanding throughout the world,” and by bringing their passion to provide service.
 
“We’re anxious to share some of our projects with the District Governor Barbara Redder, said Thor Homme, Rotary Club of Estes Park president. 
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park's events include “It’s Showtime!” and the annual Golf Tournament, which raise funds for scholarships awarded each spring to graduating seniors. The largest effort of the club is the annual Duck Race, which generated over $117,000 for 64 area charities in 2016. The club also awards community grants annually to area non-profits.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world.  There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas.  Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century.  Rotary clubs around the world, initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park welcomes new members. For more information, visit rotaryclubofestespark.org, or come to a meeting. 
 
Thursday's program: rural hospitals in Colorado
 
 
This week's program will focus on rural hospitals in Colorado. Presenter Chris Tholen is the vice president of financial policy and chief financial officer for the Colorado Hospital Association. Tholen has 18 years of experience in health care finance and strategy that includes an emphasis on government policy, hospitals, physician groups and private insurance. Prior to joining the CHA, he held positions with Kaiser Permanente and the Mayo Clinic.

Nearly one in five Americans call rural communities home. These small towns are where neighbors know each other, listen to each other, and work together towards a common goal. These are close knit communities, great places for people to raise kids, start businesses and be close to family. The local hospital is an economic driver for the community as one of the largest employers, but they face issues as well providing updated services and state-of-the art equipment for ever changing healthcare needs, an aging population suffering from a greater number of chronic conditions, declining reimbursement rates, and disproportional funding levels. Tholen will talk about the role of rural hospitals and what challenges and opportunities are ahead.
 
Tholen also will discuss Amendment 69 which will appear on the Colorado ballet in November 2016. If passed, this amendment would establish a “universal health care system” called “Colorado Care” and would create a state government-owned cooperative in which all Colorado residents over the age of 18 would be automatically enrolled as members. 
 
This week's program: Doolittle Raid on Tokyo
 
 
As a child, Dick Baggett grew up listening to stories by his parents, uncles and aunts about World War II – both Europe and Asia. In college he majored in history and psychology.  He has maintained his interest in history throughout his life. Dick has read the biographies of most of the political and military leaders of World War II. Additionally, he has read about most of the major land, air and sea battles. He has read all of the published volume works of Prime Minister Winston Churchill.
His interest in the Pacific and Asian theaters was heightened when he was in the United States Air Force and served in Vietnam, Thailand and Laos.
 
During the past few years he has developed a particular interest in the Doolittle Raid on Tokyo -- the first offensive action by the United States following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Dick has met and interviewed representatives of five of the sixteen B-25 crews that flew off the U. S. S. Hornet to attack five cities in Japan. From his research and personal visits with these people he has developed a riveting story about the Doolittle Raid on Tokyo and the crews who flew the mission.
 
Dick's reason for sharing the story of the Doolittle Raid on Tokyo is to remind his audiences that the freedom we enjoy today was previously purchased at great sacrifice by others.
 
Richard "Dick" Baggett is a Past District Governor of Rotary District 5840.
 
 
 
 

Sculptor Robert Bellows to describe Warrior StoryField Project Thursday

Metal sculptor Robert Bellows will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, July 28, at their regular noon meeting. Bellows will speak about the Warrior StoryField Project.
 
In April 2013, two combat veterans, Marine Brad Gallup and Army Ranger Danny Moore, dropped in to visit Robert Bellows in his shop and offered to help. These three men went to work heating, bending, and shaping hard iron plow sweeps into rooster feathers. Over the next six months, the act of transforming metal into art allowed them to talk effortlessly about war and the experience of combat.
 
This prompted the Warrior StoryField, a collaborative sculpture project with a core mission of exploring what it takes to bring warriors home from war. The team is comprised of veterans and civilians working in community to create a large sculptural park to be called Warrior StoryField. Bellows envisions this park as a symbolic art installation that provides an experiential moment of pause, inviting us to explore how we, both veterans and civilians, can carry the burden of our wars as a community.
 
As one team member describes the burden of his fellow veterans, “It’s the silence that’s killing us.” The objective of the Warrior StoryField is to gently pierce the veil of silence as they imagine and build three large sculptures.
 
The first sculpture is a Dragon. The Dragon represents the Warrior Protector, the Demon Destroyer, and the Guardian of the Nation. Symbolically, it carries the experience of the Warrior at War. The second sculpture is a Phoenix. The Phoenix represents the Messenger of Renewal and Transcendence. Symbolically, it carries the endless possibility of transmutation and transformation of the Veteran Come Home. The third sculpture is The Space in Between. This space is formed by placing the Dragon and the Phoenix into an eternal relationship connected through their eyes, their hearts, and the ashes below their feet. The artistic challenge is to make this connections so palpable that simply walking in between the Dragon and Phoenix can evoke a visceral experience of the invisible wounds of war, where veterans can experience deeper feelings of loss, sadness and grief. 
 
Robert Bellows is a metal sculptor working in Boulder County as an artist for 35 years. He believes that art can bring understanding to things that otherwise cannot be understood, and stimulate conversations that might otherwise never begin. 
 
The Phoenix and The Dragon
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world.  There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas.  Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century.  Rotary clubs, around the world, initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Park Village Theater, adjacent to the Other Side Restaurant.  Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend.  Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m.
 
 

Longley Parker honored as Rotarian of the Year

Our club has presented the Rotarian of the Year Award to Longley Parker, treasurer of the club board and local business owner.
 
According to tradition, the award was presented by the person who earned the honored the previous year. Tara Moenning, 2015 recipient, described the many attributes that earned Parker the award. Among those include his volunteerism with several community organizations, from the club’s Duck Race to foundation boards for the hospital and Salud on which he served as treasurer.
 
“Longley Parker is so deserving to be selected as Rotarian of the Year. He works tirelessly in his profession, serves on boards for other worthy organizations and still has time to serve as the treasurer for The Estes Park Duck Race and The Rotary Club of Estes Park. He is a huge asset to Rotary and the entire Estes Park community,” said Scott Thompson, 2015-16 president.
 
Parker, an Iowa native, has worked as an optometrist in Colorado for 15 of his 39 professional years. His patients at Aspen Eye Center in Estes Park are grateful that he did not follow his original career path as a teacher. His family includes wife Julie, and sons Chuck, who lives in Des Moines, Iowa, and Nathan, who resides in Bailey, Colorado. His hobbies draw him to the outdoors to hunt and fish with his sons. Julie, also a work partner, says Parker is “a pretty humble guy who gives freely of his time and loves to be a part of Rotary.”
 
 
 
This week's topic: brain function and exercise
 
Dr. Erica Norris and Nurse Practitioner Katrina Plassmeyer will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, July 21, at their regular noon meeting.  They will discuss how the brain functions when stimulated by exercise and what factors compose a healthy brain, as described by John Ratey, MD, in his book, “Spark.”
 
In addition, they will describe the connections between depression, anxiety, and addiction treatment modalities and exercise. 
 
Practical strategies will be presented for incorporating exercise into daily activity and how to set exercise goals.  Also, exercise appears to benefit the brains of children.
 
 
Dr. Norris, a Board Certified Family Physician, has been at Timberline Medical for the last 9 years.  Prior to that, she worked for Centro San Vicente in San Elizario, TX, Kaiser Permanente in Denver, and Wilbey Medical Clinic in Oak Harbor, WA.  She received her medical degree from the University of Colorado School of Medicine and completed her residency at St. Joseph Hospital in Denver.
 
 
Katrina Plassmeyer, a Certified Nurse Practitioner, has worked at Timberline Medical for  the past 2 years.  Previously, she was employed by St. Luke’s Family Medicine in Hailey, ID and St. Luke’s Wood River Medical Center in Ketchum, ID.  She earned her Bachelors and Master Degrees in Nursing from Idaho State University.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world.  There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas.  Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century.  Rotary clubs, around the world, initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Park Village Theater, adjacent to the Other Side Restaurant.  Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend.  Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
July 14 program to provide overview of PD's active shooter/violent intruder training
 
 
 
 
Officer Curt Plassmeyer of the Estes Park Police Department will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, July 14, at their regular noon meeting. He will discuss the ALICE Violent Intruder Training Program, a proactive response to an active shooter/violent intruder situation.
 
ALICE was developed by a law enforcement officer and his wife, an elementary school principal, after the Columbine High School massacre. The program has studied multiple active shooter situations and learned what kind of responses save lives.
 
In the 1950’s we learned to duck and cover. We lock the doors and hide under the table. But there have been multiple lives lost because of this ineffectual response.
 
ALICE stands for Alert, Lockdown, Inform, Counter, and Evacuate (not sequential). The ALICE training provides employees of schools, business, churches, and governmental agencies multiple ways to respond to an active shooter situation and to give them the confidence and training needed to save lives.
 
In the Alert portion of ALICE, Plassmeyer will talk about the different ways employees could be alerted to a violent intruder situation and how to alert the police and others in the area. He will discuss the noises, the smells, and the observations that you might encounter.
 
In the Lockdown portion of ALICE, Plassmeyer will strategize how to barricade a door, making it less inviting for an intruder. Employees will be shown how to jam a door with items at hand.
 
In the Inform portion of ALICE, Plassmeyer will discuss what information is important to give to the police and to fellow employees.  He will show how this information can assist in saving lives.
 
In the Counter portion of ALICE, if everything else fails, there may be a time where it is necessary to counter. Plassmeyer will demonstrate how to use simple items to counter the threat. He will show how easy it is to distract the threat and give you and others the time needed to survive.
 
In the Evacuate portion of ALICE, he will explain why this is the preferred response if possible. Many victims in multiple active shooter situations could have survived if they would have evacuated instead of taking the ingrained duck and cover approach. It is important to be aware of a building’s exits and how to evacuate quickly.
 
Plassmeyer has been involved in training the staff at the YMCA of the Rockies, the Town of Estes Park, and the Estes Park School District. And he will now engage and teach the Rotary Club of Estes Park.
 
Curt Plassmeyer grew up in Monument, Colorado and attended CSU for two years.  He then acquired his fishing/hunting guide license at the Royal Tine Guide School and moved to Idaho to pursue his guiding career. After he and his wife, nurse practitioner Katie Plassmeyer, had two children, he decided to start his career in Law Enforcement, working for the Blaine County Sheriff’s Department in Idaho for five years. Two years, ago he and his family moved to Estes Park, where he joined the Estes Park Police Department.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs, around the world, initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Park Village Theater, adjacent to the Other Side Restaurant. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
Welcome to the new Rotary Year
First meeting to be a Club Assembly
 
Please plan to attend this week's Rotary Club of Estes Park meeting on Thursday, July 7. This will be Thor Homme's first meeting as 2016-17 President and he would like to see everyone there. Members will receive an update from the following committees:
  • Club Administration: Karol Rinehart
  • Community Service: Roger Thorp
  • Fund Development: Kathy Groesbeck
  • International Service: Anastacia Galloway
  • Membership: Scott Thompson
  • Programs: Rick Taylor
  • Youth/Vocational: Dmitri Galcovski
Many club members have signed up for the above committees and more help is needed on each. Learn about the work of the club, which occurs at the grass roots committee level. President Thor encourages all members to become an active part on these committees to more fully understand the club's service mission and to connect with new and old friends. 
 
"Active membership is the lifeblood of any club. Our focus this year will be on our membership and on building our committees. Please consider how you can contribute," Homme said.
 
 
Start of Rotary year brings new leadership, praise for outgoing leaders
 
Members of the Estes Park Rotary Club recently gathered to thank outgoing officers and board members, present awards and install new leadership.
 
The club thanked 2015-16 President Scott Thompson and turned the gavel over to 2016-17 President Thor Homme. Award winners included Trudy Collar, who earned the Spirit Award, and Rita DuChateau, who received and the Distinguished Service Award. The Rotarian of the Year award will be presented at a later date.
 
   
 
Thompson recognized 2015-16 Rotary Foundation Board President Brad Rosenbaum, Vice-President Sarah Walsh, Secretary Ken TeSelle, Treasurer Gregg Jurgens and members Sue Fereday, Phil Moenning and Marcia Yelick. The incoming members of the 2016-17 Foundation Board members were also announced: Sue Fereday, Kerrie Hill, Jeff Liddle, Phil Moenning, Scott Thompson, Sarah Walsh and Marsha Yelick.
 
Thompson also thanked his 2015-16 Club Board of Directors: Chuck Bonza, Bob Brunson, Rita DuChateau, Dana Fritz, Anastacia Galloway, Dmitri Galcovski, Kathy Groesbeck, Longley Parker, Karol Rinehart, Brad Rosenbaum and Rick Taylor. Thor Homme received his President’s pin, thanked Thompson on behalf of the club and gave him a framed gavel to commemorate his leadership. Homme introduced his Club Board of Directors: Rita DuChateau, secretary; Longley Parker, treasurer; Randy Skeie, sergeant-at-arms; Scott Thompson, past president and membership; Karol Rinehart, club administration; Roger Thorp, community service; Anastacia Galloway, international service; Dmitri Galcovski, youth/new generation and Kathy Groesbeck, fund development.
 
Homme said the Rotary Club of Estes Park has routinely placed him in positions outside of his comfort zone and has helped him grow as a leader. He encouraged all club members to actively serve on committees, help new members feel valued, and step up to leadership positions.
 
The annual President’s Night event took place at the National Park Village June 25 and included a performance by member Bruce Carmichael on guitar and vocals.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park is a service organization that provides support for local and international projects. Its events include “It’s Showtime!” and the annual Golf Tournament, which raise funds for scholarships awarded each spring to graduating seniors. The largest effort of the club is the annual Duck Race, which generated over $117,000 for 64 area charities in 2016. The club welcomes new members. For more information, visit rotaryclubofestespark.org
 

20th Annual Rotary Scholarship Benefit Golf Tournament a win for golfers, students

 
A great turnout, a gorgeous day and some fabulous prizes created a successful Rotary Scholarship Benefit Golf Tournament on June 25, according to the event chairman.
 
“The 2016 event drew 57 golfers, and many said that it was a fun tournament ,” said Bruce Carmichael, chairman. “We are still collecting sponsor pledges and paying our bills, so I can't give official fundraising results, but I believe we have well exceeded our goal of $10,000,” he added.
 
A complete list of sponsors and prize donors will be available within a week, he added.
 
The event winners were:
 
1st Place Team: Bruce Carmichael, Greg Yager, Bill Davis, Katie Shilts
2nd Place Team: Dale Berg, John Micek, Nancy Micek, Audrey Ault
3rd Place Team: Morgan Mulch, James Carnell, Rich Flanery, Mike Louk
Putting Contest: Isaac Calden
Closest to the Pin, Hole #2: John Vorreiter
Closest to the Pin, Hole #7: Scott Rowan
Closest to the Pin, Hole #10: Virgil Yarbrough
Closest to the Pin, Hole #15: John Gelhaus
Most Accurate Drive Men: Paul Nickel
Most Accurate Drive Women: Pat Vorreiter
Longest Putt Men: John Vorreiter
Longest Putt Women: Kerri Logan
 
“This tournament has been a summer highlight for Estes area golfers for many years. The support we received from golfers, sponsors and the many merchants who donated prizes all combine to create a memorable afternoon. Most importantly, the funds we raise for scholarships make college a little more affordable for our local students,” Carmichael said.
 
No regular meeting this week
 
Plan to attend President's Night Friday, June 24
 
 
As our Rotary year draws to a close, it's time to celebrate, recognize and thank club members who made 2015-16  memorable and successful. President's Night also looks ahead to the 2016-17 Rotary year and salutes the new officers, Club Board and Foundation Board members.
 
While our club focuses on Service Above Self, this event is an evening to look within the organization and take pride in the year's accomplishments. It's a special program and we hope you will join in the fun, food and fellowship.
 
When? Friday, June 24 5:30 p.m. cash bar, 6 p.m. dinner, and 7 p.m. program
Where? The Other Side Theater (our regular meeting room)
Cost? $20 per person
Who? You and your guests
How? Please contact Karol Rinehart, Club Administrator at kj.rinehart@centurylink.net or by calling her at (970) 586-5719.
 
See you at President's Night!
 
 
Thursday's program: Kristi Elyce on the Loveland sculpture show
 
 
Kristi Elyce will describe Loveland’s Sculpture in the Park celebration at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, May 26, at their regular noon meeting.
 
Sculpture in the Park will be celebrating its 33rd anniversary this year in Loveland, Colorado, on the second weekend in August. It is the largest outdoor juried sculpture show in the United States. She will describe this amazing show that takes place in our own backyard. The Loveland High Plains Arts Council, a non-profit organization, hosts the show in order to support the Benson Sculpture Garden, a beautiful park in Loveland that displays over $5 million in sculpture.  
 
Kristi Elyce has been involved with Sculpture in the Park as a volunteer for many years and is the Show Business Manager for the Loveland High Plains Arts Council. She lives in Estes Park and served as the President of the Estes Valley Sunrise Rotary Club in 2014-2015. Previously, she worked many years in human resources management, including eight years at Harmony Foundation.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Park Village Theater, adjacent to the Other Side Restaurant. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
 
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Speakers
Club Directors/Committee Chairpersons
Feb 23, 2017
Fourth Thursday Committee Work
Dick Life
Mar 02, 2017
Understanding Russian Leaders
Arnold Geiger
Mar 09, 2017
Capacity Building thru Education Around the World