Rotary Club of Estes Park
Service Above Self
Since April 17, 1926
 
Club Information

Welcome to our Club!

Estes Park

We meet Thursdays at 12:00 PM
Nicky's Steakhouse
1350 Fall River Rd.
Estes Park, CO  80517
United States of America
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Officers And Directors
President
President Elect
Treasurer
Secretary
Sergeant-at-Arms
Past President
Club Administration
Community Service Co-Chair
Community Service Co-Chair
Fund Development
International Service
Membership
Youth/New Generation Services
Program Committee Chair
 
Home Page Stories
Nov. 14 program: 
Learn about the RM Conservancy 
 

Rocky Mountain Conservancy promotes stewardship of Rocky Mountain National Park and similar lands through education and philanthropy. Established in 1931, the Rocky Mountain Conservancy (formerly the Rocky Mountain Nature Association) is one of the oldest national park cooperating organizations in the nation. 

Estee Rivera Murdock, Executive Director at the Rocky Mountain Conservancy, will be speaking to the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Nov. 14, at their regular noon meeting.  Her program will focus on the Rocky Mountain Conservancy.

 

Estee Rivera Murdock

Since its founding, the Conservancy has provided over 30 million dollars of funding in order to support Rocky Mountain National Park and related public lands.  Furthermore, it produces educational publications, offers seminars, supports research, and provides philanthropic support to Rocky Mountain National Park.

Born and raised in southern Arizona, Murdock worked for the National Park Service for nearly a decade, first at Saguaro National Park and later at the Washington DC Headquarters office.

Murdock received a BA in Anthropology and Spanish literature and a MA in Geography with a focus on Hispanic Community Engagement and Public Lands and Geographic Information Science, all from the University of Arizona. Currently, she resides in Estes Park with her husband and daughter.

Delivering pumpkins and smiles to students
Rotary Club of Estes Park continues tradition 
 
Hundreds of elementary and preschool students came home from school October 18 with pumpkins, courtesy of the Rotary Club of Estes Park and the Safeway Foundation. The tradition, which began in 1936, is one of the many local service projects of the 93-year old club. 
 
This year’s event organizer was Sue Fereday, Rotary club’s Youth and New Generations director. She was especially grateful for the help provided by the Estes Park Interact Club . Interact is a service club for youth ages 12 to 18 who want to connect with other young people and have fun while serving their communities and learning about the world. Clubs are sponsored by local Rotary clubs. 
 
Fereday applied for a grant from the Safeway Foundation, which generously donated 560 large pumpkins. She picked up 14 crates of pumpkins at Safeway and delivered them to Estes Park Elementary School and Mountaintop Preschool, where she and volunteers unloaded them and helped the students select the perfect prize. Fereday is thankful for the support of several Estes Park Safeway employees, including Store Manager Elise Rowton, Assistant Grocery Manager Eric Gruber and Assistant Produce Manager Laura Madigan.
 
“They are wonderful people to work with,” Fereday said.
 
Rotary volunteers included Jim Austin, Barb Bibler, Mike Connolly, Kris and Gary Hazelton and Virgil Holtgrewe. 
 
“It’s exciting to watch Rotarians carry on an Estes Park tradition that has been in place for over 80 years now,” said Rotary Club President Doug Mann. “Some of the parents of these children even received pumpkins from this club when they were in school! We’re thrilled to have been able to continue this wonderful community project this year.”
 
The 83rd Annual Pumpkin Distribution Day began in 1936 with Ron Brodie, former Estes Park mayor and Rotary Club of Estes Park president, according to 42-year club member Tom Maher. Brodie owned Brodie’s Supermarket and provided pumpkins for elementary students for many years. Following Brodie’s death, Rotary Club took over the pumpkin project, with the support of Brodie’s family and friends. The tradition continues.
 
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Financial wellness:
What it means for J1 international students
 

Jennifer Comstock, a Financial Wellness Consultant at Key Bank and a member of our club, will be speaking on Thursday, Oct. 17, at our regular noon meeting. Her program will focus on financial wellness, in particular how it relates to the J1 visa international students who work in our local Estes Park businesses each summer.

Jennifer Comstock

Joining Comstock will be Hristina Zhabievska, a former J1 student from Macedonia and now, likewise, a Financial Wellness Consultant at Key Bank. Zhabievska will share her experience with the J1 program in Estes Park and her path to U.S. citizenship.

After completing her bachelors degree at the University of Texas at Austin, Comstock worked in client services in multiple industries, including advertising, marketing, real estate, and now banking.  She moved to Estes Park from Texas a year ago with her husband, spending as much time as possible enjoying all the beauty Estes has to offer.

This week's program: EPH's Tim Cashman
 

Tim Cashman, Chief Financial Officer for Estes Park Health, will be speaking to our club on Thursday, Oct. 3, at the regular noon meeting. His program will focus on critical access hospitals.

Tim Cashman

Cashman has been working in the finance space of health care for over 25 years, bringing extensive experience and knowledge of rural hospital management.  He began in Colorado Springs at Cedar Springs Psychiatric Hospital in 1988. He then migrated to Gunnison in 1996 as CFO for Gunnison Valley Hospital, a 25-bed critical access hospital. After 15 years, he and his family moved to Glenwood Springs to work with Valley View Hospital. In 2015, Cashman moved to Billings, Montana, for two years as Network Finance Director with the Billings Clinic, overseeing several critical access hospitals in the Montana area.  

Tim enjoys reading, running, skiing, exploring the West, and hanging out with family and friends.

Be a positive presence in a youth's life 
Learn how at this week's program
 

Have you ever considered mentoring a child?  Partners Mentoring Youth helps match youth age 7-17 with positive adult role models to enrich lives and build community.

Kathy Whitacre, Program Coordinator for Partners Mentoring Youth, will be speaking to our club on Thursday, Sept. 19, at our regular noon meeting. Her program will discuss programs, volunteer opportunities, the youth they serve, and the challenges this younger generation may face. 

Kathy Whitacre

Whitacre worked for 20 years as a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor and Flood Recovery Specialist. After a successful career helping people recover from traumatic injuries and events, she now facilitates building enriching relationships between our youth, adults, and community.

Kayce Anderson to present this week:
How For the Good improves girls' lives
 

Dr. Kayce Anderson, Executive Director of For the Good, will be speaking to our club on Thursday, Sept. 12, at our regular noon meeting. Her program will discuss how For the Good is involved in helping young girls in rural Kenya and Sub-Saharan Africa attain a secondary school education.

 

Dr. Kayce Anderson with young girls in Africa

As a humanitarian, ecologist, explorer, student, and mother, Anderson feels strongly that education is a right and a leverage point to address many global challenges. She applies her training as an ecologist to her work, combining evidence-based methods and community input to improve education outcomes for girls.

Anderson completed a bachelors degree at the University of Colorado, Boulder and a Ph.D. at the University of California, Davis. She tries to stay outside more than in, surrounds herself with people she respects, and challenges her own preconceptions. She loves to see people set big goals and succeed.

Lifting 1,000 children from poverty in India
Mark Lee to present on Bethania Kids
 
The Thursday, Sept. 5 program will be presented by Estes Park resident Mark Lee. He will provide an introduction to the economic conditions in India and the impact they have on Indian children. Then he will introduce the to the Bethania Kids organization and its charter and tell the story of how it is making a positive difference in the life of more than 1,000 children today.
 
Lee has worked in the consulting and information technology industry for the last 30 years, including 12 years as a partner with KPMG and most currently as the Senior VP of Customer Services for a Silicon Valley software company, Solix Technologies. Like many technology workers, the internet has made it possible for him to work from anywhere, and he chose Estes Park as  home base. Lee moved to the Estes Valley in 2005 with his wife Karen, and son, David. During these years, Lee's work has required frequent trips to India to collaborate with a large group of engineers on his team based in Hyderabad, India.     
 
Lee, center with some of the older boys and alumni of Angel House in Rajahmundry, Andra Pradesh.
 
"During my trips, I have witnessed the extreme poverty in India and seen its effect on children," Lee explains. "Being surrounded by small children in the street begging for food and rupees made a huge impression and motivated me to learn more about these kids. This ultimately led me to Bethania Kids, a charity focused on helping at-risk children in southern India. First I became a donor, then a volunteer, and have recently joined their board of directors."
 
Some young residents of Angel Home
D.G. Chris Woodruff to present program 
 
Chris Woodruff, Governor of Rotary District 5440, will speak this week at our regular club meeting at Nicky's. His district includes 53 Rotary clubs in Wyoming, Northern Colorado, Eastern Idaho and Western Nebraska.
 
The International Rotary theme for the year is Rotary Connects the World!  DG Chris will focus on the People of Action Campaign for Rotary International and the difference that Rotarians make in their community. The theme emphasizes all the projects and activities that the Estes Park Club accomplishes, locally and internationally. Opportunities are plentiful for potential members, young and old, to help Rotary achieve its mission of “peace and understanding throughout the world,” and by bringing their passion for service to their communities.
 
Chris Woodruff is the retired assessor in Weld County. He makes his home In Greeley. He completed a 40-year career in property appraisal and assessment with work experience all over the Colorado. He has a bachelor's degree in technical management from Regis University and is a certified general real estate appraiser.
 
Chris became a Rotarian in 2000 when he joined the Rotary Club of Greeley - Centennial.  He subsequently served as secretary, president and Foundation chair and was named club Rotarian of the Year three times. At the district level, Chris served as assistant governor for the Estes Park clubs, awards committee chairman, TRF mentor and as a member of the district Foundation committee. He has also presented at several district assemblies and has served as a facilitator at High Country PETS. Chris travelled to Saratov, Russia as part of a District 5440 delegation attending the chartering of a new club in that city. On that trip he saw the power of Rotary in transforming people’s lives by providing a means to connect across great geographic, cultural and language differences. 
 
He is married to Karoline, who is also a Rotarian, a past club president and past assistant governor. Karoline retired from a career in higher education in 2016. Chris and Karoline are Multiple Paul Harris Fellows, Bequest Society members and Major Donors.They have attended Rotary International Conferences in Montreal, Atlanta, Toronto, and Hamburg. Both are active at Trinity Episcopal Church and in other areas of the Greeley community, including the Weld Food Bank, and Greeley Center for Independence, and have been past Board members of the Greeley Chamber of Commerce and Visitor’s Bureau. Both are graduates of Leadership Weld County. Chris and Karoline enjoy gardening, reading, traveling the world and wearing their Rotary pins. They have three sons, three daughters-in-law and one beautiful granddaughter.
 
 
Chris and Karoline Woodruff

Thursday's program

The life of a football referee

Jon Bible, football referee and current SEC instant replay official, will be speaking to the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Aug. 15, at their regular noon meeting. His presentation will focus on how football referees prepare for SEC football games. Please note the Rotary Club of Estes Park’s new meeting location at Nicky’s Restaurant.

Bible will discuss how referees prepare throughout the year and are evaluated, some philosophies in calling fouls, and controversial areas such as catch vs. incomplete pass. In addition, he will review the complexity of the rule book.  

John Bible

His professional officiating included stints in the NFL, NFL Europe, and the United Football League. His collegiate officiating has included the Big XII Conference and the Southwest Conference. On-field post-season has included the BCS 2007 National Championship, the Division I 1992 National Championship, five Big XII Championship Games, and the Holiday Bowl twice, Outback Bowl, Aloha Bowl, Peach/Chick-fil-A Bowl 5 times and Poinsettia Bowl. Instant replay post-season has included the BCS 2018 Semi-final (Cotton Bowl), SEC Championship Game, and the Holiday Bowl, Fiesta Bowl, Orange Bowl and Cotton Bowl.

Furthermore, he has extensive experience as a baseball umpire, both professional umpiring and collegiate umpiring. He was chosen as the U.S. representative for the 1988 Olympics and the 1987 Pan American Games.

A Professor of Business Law, he is a Professor Emeritus at Texas State University. Married to Carolyn, he spends time in both Texas and Colorado.

Aaron Florence, D.O. 

A cut above - EPH surgical services

Aaron Florence, D.O., orthopedic surgeon, will be speaking to the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, August 8, at their regular noon meeting.  Dr. Florence will talk about Estes Park Health’s General and Orthopedic Surgical Services. Please note the club's new meeting location at Nicky’s Restaurant. 

A native of Idaho, Dr. Florence received his B.S. degree in Biology from Idaho State University and went on to obtain his Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine from A.T. Still University, Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine in Kirksville, Missouri.  

Aaron Florence, D.O.

He completed his residency at the New York Institute of Technology-New York College of Osteopathic Medicine at Peninsula Hospital Center in the North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System. He completed his sub-specialty fellowship training in sports medicine at the Barton/Lake Tahoe Orthopedic Sports Medicine Fellowship in Zephyr Cove, Nevada.  

During his residency in New York City and Long Island and his fellowship training in Lake Tahoe, Dr. Florence trained and performed surgery in 14 different hospitals with team physicians of the NY Yankees, NY Jets, NY Islanders, National Basketball Association Referees, U.S. Open Tennis, Professional Golf Association, U.S. Ski Team, U.S. Snowboarding, U.S. Figure Skating, U.S. Merchant Marine Academy Football at Kings Point, Nassau Community College Football, and Hofstra University Football. 

Throughout his training, a recurrent theme emerged as surgeon after surgeon would say the same thing—the ultimate compliment in the world of orthopedic surgery:  "You have good hands." With those good hands, Dr. Florence excelled in many of the subspecialties of orthopedic surgery, including sports medicine, joint replacements and fracture care. With such a diverse skill set, his focus could not be limited to only one orthopedic subspecialty. Instead, he confidently set out to provide excellent orthopedic care and started the Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine Service Line at Estes Park Health in 2010. This new service line has provided the residents of Estes Park, with advanced, ultramodern orthopedic care without having to travel down to the Front Range.

In this capacity, Dr. Florence provides orthopedic care to various joints, including hips, knees, and shoulders. He performs surgical procedures, including arthroscopy, fracture care, and total joint replacements of the hips, knees, shoulders and elbows. With his additional sports medicine training, he performs many other specialized surgeries in both the young and older injured athlete, including hip arthroscopy, rotator cuff repair and ACL reconstruction. He is both a Board Certified Orthopedic Surgeon and a Board Certified Orthopedic Sports Medicine Subspecialist.

Having grown up in a small Idaho town and living in the Midwest and New York, Dr. Florence and his wife and five children are excited to be living in Estes Park.

August 1 program
Learn about the new K9 Program for EPPD
 

Officer Mikel Otazua and Captain Eric Rose, of the Estes Park Police Department, will be speaking to the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, August 1, at the regular noon meeting. They would like to introduce us to the new Police Department K9 Program. Please note the Rotary Club of Estes Park’s new meeting location at Nicky’s Restaurant.

  

           Captain Eric Rose                        Officer Mikel Otazua

Mikel Otazua, a member of the Estes Park Police Department for three years, has had a life-long career goal of becoming a K9 Handler in a small town. Born in Venezuela, he moved to Texas at the age of six where his passion for dogs began. While growing up, he was actively involved in fostering, adopting and rescuing dogs, before finding their forever homes. He received his education from Miami-Dade Community College, Florida International University to study criminal justice, and University of Colorado Denver. He completed the Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) Academy, prior to being hired by the Estes Park Police Department.

Eric Rose, Captain for Police Operations, is responsible for customer service, training, recruiting, equipment, budgeting, emergency manager, and more.

Supporting literacy in Nigeria- 
Thaine Norris describes his journey
 
Jenta Reads Community Library is an organic community development project started by a group of youth in a slum in Jos, Nigeria. Burdened by patterns of school dropouts, teen pregnancy, drug addiction, and general hopelessness, a team of about 15 twenty-somethings launched an intiative to #ChangeTheNarrative of their own community. Starting in a humble storage room in 2018, the Jenta Reads Community Library is now a three room facility with a full time librarian, and an army of trained volunteers and strategic partnerships, doing children's reading programs, poetry and writing competitions, chess competitions, computer classes, robotics and electronics, community health projects, community waste management projects, addiction recovery programs, spawning child libraries in other communities and schools, and more. It is truly a beautiful story.
 
Thaine Norris
 
Thaine Norris is a follower of Jesus, husband of Dr. Norris, father of six, and works at home as an independent software developer. He and his family have lived in Estes Park for 12 years, where they have been involved in the community through church, scouting, Rotary student exchanges, music, and cycling.Thaine and his family travel frequently because of personal involvements all over the world, but primarily in Asia and Africa.
 
"We have yet to travel simply as tourists," Norris said.
 

Trail grants and roundabouts:

Upcoming public works projects in Estes Park

The Town of Estes Park Public Works Department is pursuing federal grant funding in excess of $50 million for trail, roadway, bridge, and Big Thompson River channel improvement projects to be built by 2025. Additionally, roundabout control upgrades are under design for three intersections in Estes Park. Construction is anticipated in 2020, 2022, and a future date to be determined by funding availability.   

Greg Muhonen, Director of the Town of Estes Park Public Works Department, will be speaking to the club on Thursday, July 11, at the regular noon meeting. His program will focus on trail grants and roundabouts.

Greg Muhonen, public works director

Muhonen earned a BS degree in Civil Engineering from Stanford University, completed graduate studies in Arctic Engineering at the University of Alaska, and is a Licensed Professional Engineer. He has used his training and life experience to serve the transportation infrastructure needs of Larimer county residents for over 33 years.  

His civil engineering work experience spans private land development, land use entitlement review, traffic engineering, municipal policy, and public works capital project design and construction.  He was honored as Employee of the Year for the City of Loveland Engineering Division twice and for Program of the Year for the Larimer County Urban Area Street Standards.

As Estes Park Director of Public Works for five years, he oversees all aspects of the streets, parks, engineering, facilities, parking/transit, and fleet divisions for the Town. In 2017, he received the Public Works Project Award for the Estes Park Transit Facility Parking Structure.

The club meets this Thursday at Nicky's Steakhouse, 1350 Fall River Rd, Estes Park. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 

SAVA strives to reduce sexual violence

Our program this week will be presented by Dorothy Farrel, executive director of the Sexual Assault Victim Advocate Center, which serves Northern Colorado. She will discuss myths and statistics surrounding sexual assault, as well as laws and reporting requirements. Farrel will share a survivor's story, share SAVA's resources, and some strategies on what we can do to change the culture of sexual assault in our community. 

Dorothy Farrel

Dorothy Farrel grew up in Estes Park, where her parents still live. She then moved to Arizona after receiving her Bachelor's and Master's degrees in Social Work from Colorado State University. While in Arizona, she worked in the nonprofit sector for 17 years, including a role of Executive Director for a nonprofit that served high risk youth and young adults. She is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in AZ and CO. In 2010, she achieved a personal goal of obtaining her Doctoral degree in Organizational Leadership. She then moved back home to Northern Colorado and taught at CSU and online universities. Last spring she joined the SAVA team as Executive Director, where she shares her mission of reducing sexual violence within the community. 

This week's program:

What's new in your park and rec district?

The Estes Valley Community Center opened February, 2018,  and has become an integral part of the recreation, fitness and wellness opportunities in Estes Park.  

Tom Carosello and Dawn Wilson will be speaking to our club  on Thursday, June 6, at the regular noon meeting. Please note the change in venue to Nicky’s Restaurant. Carosello and Wilson will provide an update on the Community Center as well as the new disc golf course at the Lake Estes 9-hole Golf Course, Stanley Park updates, and various other improvements throughout the Estes Valley Recreation and Park District.

 

    

Carosello was named the executive director for the Estes Valley Recreation and Park District in 2015, after having served in a similar capacity for the Town of Pagosa Springs for nine years. Prior to that, he was a journalist and grant writer who covered local sports, environmental, and government issues in Ohio, Arizona and Colorado. He has a B.A. in Sports Journalism and Public Relations from the Ohio State University.  

Wilson is the marketing and communications manager for the Estes Valley Recreation and Park District since 2016. She leads the promotional efforts for all of the District’s businesses, including the golf courses, rec center, marina, campgrounds, recreation, and general District activities and events.

Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world.  There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.

The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets this Thursday at Nicky’s Restaurant in Estes Park, located at 1350 Fall River Road. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 

Keeping visiting grandkids safe-

Dr. John Meyer to discuss pediatric poisonings

The most common place for a child to become exposed to dangerous chemicals and to suffer poisoning is at grandma and grandpa’s house.  

Dr. John Meyer, Emergency Medicine Physician at Estes Park Health, will be speaking to the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, May 16, at our regular noon meeting. Meyer will be discussing common household pediatric poisonings, statistical data from 2017 poisonings, and tips to prevent household poisonings.

Dr. John Meyer

Meyer was born and raised in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, attended Colorado State University, and received his Doctor of Medicine from the Medical College of Wisconsin. He completed his residency training in Emergency Medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin and is Board Certified in Emergency Medicine. He is the Co-Director of the Emergency Department and the current Chief of Staff at Estes Park Health.

Meyer, married with two young children, has lived in Estes Park for six years.

Thursday's program: 
Duck Race celebration, sponsor recognition
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park will host a Duck Race Celebration Luncheon/Thank You Reception for sponsors of the Rotary Duck Race Festival on Thursday, May 9, 2019 during the regular club meeting at The Ridgeline Hotel in the Trail Ridge Room. Duck Race Sponsors have been invited to attend to enjoy a complimentary lunch provided by The Ridgeline Hotel. 'Big Duck' Kathy Groesbeck will introduce each sponsor and award them their souvenir 2019 Sponsor Duck painted especially for them by students at Eagle Rock and Estes Park High School. Kathy  also will offer some special highlights of this year's successful 31st annual Rotary Duck Race Festival. Club member Harriette Woodard chairs this event and has planned a delightful luncheon to honor our Duck Race sponsors. We deeply appreciate their generosity and look forward to thanking them in person at the luncheon!
 
Come and celebrate our Duck Race and its generous sponsors

EPHS Major 13 to perform Thursday

Having just performed at the Colorado High School Activities Association Vocal Jazz and A Cappella Festival in Colorado Springs, Major13 brings a brilliant repertoire to our Rotary club on Thursday. Dr. Alan Denney directs the ensemble. Be ready to be entertained!

Dr. Alan Denney

Major13 is the vocal jazz ensemble of Estes Park High School and is comprised of a select group of auditioned students. This ensemble regularly performs in the Estes Park community. Under Denney's direction, the EPHS choir students have performed four times in Carnegie Hall and annually perform the national anthem for Denver Nuggets’ and Colorado Avalanche games.

Denney is in his 14th year as choral director at Estes Park High School and Estes Park Middle School. He holds a Bachelor of Music degree in Music Education from Indiana State University, a Master of Music degree in Music Theory and Composition from Colorado State University, and a Doctor of Arts degree in Choral Conducting from University of Northern Colorado. Dr. Denney serves on the Board of Directors of the Colorado Chapter of the American Choral Directors Association.

Powering the future, battling climate change

Gordon McAlpine, retired astrophysicist and consultant for the Platte River Power Authority, will speak to the Rotary Club of Estes Park Thursday, April 17, at their regular noon meeting. MacAlpine will be speaking about climate change, electricity generation in Colorado, and the need to transition to renewable energy generation.

Gordon McAlpine

Global temperatures are rising, and they will continue to rise because of the well documented greenhouse effect. Burning fossil fuels has loaded Earth’s atmosphere with more carbon dioxide than prior to the Pliocene Epoch, when oceans were roughly 100 feet higher and many animals lived above the Arctic Circle and on the Antarctic continent.  

Recent reports from the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the United States Fourth National Climate Assessment indicate that humanity has only about a 10-12 year window of opportunity to cut back dramatically on fossil fuel use if we are to head off the most catastrophic climatic events. These climatic events include massive methane releases, which have occurred in the past and were associated with destruction of the biosphere and with global mass extinctions.  

Here in Colorado, higher temperatures are causing drought conditions, increased wildfires, pine-beetle infestations, and wildlife stress and losses. In addition, economic impacts related to human health, agricultural productivity, property destruction, and ecosystem services are considerable. Coloradans are paying a huge “hidden tax” for electricity from fossil-fuel power plants.

Fortunately, technology and electric grid advances, along with price reductions such as economies of scale, have produced a situation where carbon-free electricity from renewable sources like solar and wind can be reliable and significantly less expensive compared with electricity derived from burning coal or gas. Detailed analyses suggest that Colorado utilities can make the transition to primarily solar and wind power within 10-12 years, with net savings of billions of dollars.

The municipalities of Estes Park, Fort Collins, Longmont and Loveland, along with the Platte River Power Authority which serves them, have set a goal of achieving 100% carbon-free electricity production by 2030. The state of Colorado has also committed to renewable electricity by 2040. There will be challenges, but these are realistic and necessary goals as we move forward with preserving the state’s environment and growing its clean-energy economy.

McAlpine has a BA in Physics from Earlham College and a PhD in Astrophysics from the University of Wisconsin. Following a stint as a member of the Institute for Advanced Study, he joined the Astronomy faculty at the University of Michigan. After retiring from Michigan, he accepted a position at Trinity University in Texas, where he continued to teach Physics and Climate Science. Gordon and his wife, Barbara, moved to Estes Park in 2014. He has been active with the Estes Valley Astronomical Society and has been working with the Platte River Power Authority as they transition to renewable energy generation.

Rebuilding Nepal: Dave Boon to present Thursday
 
Dave Boon, a Rotarian and Estes Park resident, will be our speaker on Thursday, April 11. He will present a program on projects in Nepal that the Rotary Club of Fort Collins After Work Club has been involved with for the past 10 years. More recently, the Nepal work included rebuilding of six school damaged by the 2015 earthquakes. They have funded schools, toilets, women's empowerment centers and much more.  
 
Dave Boon
Nepal a country that is approximately 500 miles long and only 120 miles wide bring up visions of beautiful landscapes, terraced rice fields, trekking and the highest mountains in the world. Some things you may not know about Nepal is that they have elephants, crocodiles, tigers, and rhinos. It is also a very poor country and is one of the largest sex trafficking corridor in the world with an estimated 5,000 to 10,000 girls and women being smuggled to India each year.  
 
In 2015, Nepal was hit by two consecutive devastating earthquakes (April 25 - 7.8 and again on May 12th 7.3) that resulted in over 8,500 deaths. These earthquakes also destroyed or damaged 7,923 schools. Of those destroyed and damaged only 2,700 have been rebuilt leaving approximately one million students still studying in temporary structures.  
 
Public education is free, but only approximately 15% of women aged 20-24 have completed secondary school - 85% have not.   Even though public school is free, there are still costs of uniforms, exam fees and other costs that keep many rural, poor children from attending school.  Why help the children of Nepal with education?  

As Nelson Mandala said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” Providing access to education (personal and financial support) is key to helping girls and women in Nepal succeed and gain gender equity. 
 
Dave Boon is a charter member of the Fort Collins Rotary After Work (RAW) Club, is a two-time President, and is currently the Chair of the International Committee. He is a Paul Harris Fellow and was awarded the RI Presidential "4-Avenues of Service Award".  He has been involved in RYLA and Young RYLA since 2003 and has been a Chair of YRYLA, and a Senior Councilor at RYLA and YRYLA, a speaker at all three, has been on the Rocky Mountain Board of Directors and is their Past President. Dave is passionate about helping children -- he is the Executive Director of the Children's Speech and Reading Center and he and his wife have a non-profit (Empowering Opportunities) that support orphan and marginalized youth in Nepal. Dave is married to Rotarian June Boon. They recently moved to Estes Park, and also celebrated the birth of their grandson, Bodie.

This week: Two Sides of the Coin: 

The Russians' Point of View

Milt Garrett, owner and CEO of Garrett Group International, will be speaking to the club on Thursday, April 4, at our regular noon meeting. Garrett will share some perspectives and points of view of Russians, from his staff and interpreters, Russian university students, and ambassadorial and news sources.

Milt Garrett

Their question to Garrett is, “Why is America mad at us?”  Why are Putin and Russians at odds with America, resulting in international conflicts, sanctions, and election meddling? Why is Russia being so aggressive today? While Putin is acting like a bully, the better question is “why?”

What agreements with the Russians have been kept or not kept since perestroika and the fall of the Berlin Wall by the various U.S. administrations? What about placing missiles in Poland, the U.N. Security Council on Libya, Ukraine turning West, Crimea, and the new U.S. guided missile destroyer.

While he professes that he does not have all the answers about Russia, politically or economically, socially or environmentally, he does encourage questions and dialogue.

Dr. Garrett has clients in seven countries, with an overseas focus on Russia’s economic recovery.  For 41 years as a special consultant helping public and private organizations, he improves their competitive edge and their profits by working on their management systems.

In particular, Garrett has worked across Russia’s 11-time zones from the Baltic Sea to the Pacific Ocean, from the Arctic Ocean to the Black Sea and Caspian Sea, with clients in 226 cities. He is a “Deming Disciple,” a teacher in the International Quality movement, and a Senior State Quality Awards Examiner.  In addition, he is an internationally known consultant and executive coach to CEOs as well as federal, state, and local public officials.

Caring for your treasured family collections:

EP Museum staff to provide update and tips

Jessica Michak and Mikaela Fundaun, Estes Park Museum curators, will speak to our club Thursday, March 21, at the regular noon meeting. They will provide an update on the Estes Park Museum and provide advice on how we can care for our own home collections.

The Estes Park Museum conducts activities that preserve, share and respect the unique history of Estes Park. Currently being remodeled, the future Collections and Research Facility will give Estes Park Museum staff space for over 30,000 locally significant artifacts and a place for visitors and researchers to study their significance.

Michak, Curator of Collections, oversees more than 30,000 objects, handles research requests, and is overseeing the museum-wide collections move. Fascinated with museums since childhood, she received a BA in history and anthropology from Clarion University of Pennsylvania, and then a MA in public history at Appalachian State University in North Carolina. From 2012 to 2017, she worked as an archivist and the lead archival records processor for Deadwood History, Inc., in Deadwood, South Dakota.

Fundaun, Curator of Interpretation, oversees the permanent and temporary exhibitions as well as programming. With a passion for history and museums, she earned a BA in anthropology from the University of Wyoming and then served as curator at Deadwood History, Inc., caring for the artifact collection for two museums and a historic house museum. She completed her education with a MA in museum studies from the Cooperstown Graduate Program in Cooperstown, New York, gaining a variety of experience at institutions such as The Fenimore Art Museum, The Farmer’s Museum and the Arkell Museum.

New surgical services at EP Health - 
Dr. Florence to highlight Thursday's program
 

Aaron Florence, D.O., orthopedic surgeon, will be speaking to the club on Thursday, March 14, at their regular noon meeting. Dr. Florence will talk about new surgical services at Estes Park Health.

A native of Idaho, Dr. Florence received his B.S. degree in Biology from Idaho State University and went on to obtain his Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine from A.T. Still University, Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine in Kirksville, Missouri. He completed his residency at the New York Institute of Technology-New York College of Osteopathic Medicine at Peninsula Hospital Center in the North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System. He completed his sub-specialty fellowship training in sports medicine at the Barton/Lake Tahoe Orthopedic Sports Medicine Fellowship in Zephyr Cove, Nevada.  

 Aaron Florence, D.O.,  Board Certified Orthopedic Surgeon, Board Certified Orthopedic Sports Medicine Subspecialist.

During his residency in New York City and Long Island and his fellowship training in Lake Tahoe, Dr. Florence trained and performed surgery in 14 different hospitals with team physicians of the N.Y. Yankees, N.Y. Jets, N.Y. Islanders, National Basketball Association Referees, U.S. Open Tennis, Professional Golf Association, U.S. Ski Team, U.S. Snowboarding, U.S. Figure Skating, U.S. Merchant Marine Academy Football at Kings Point, Nassau Community College Football, and Hofstra University Football. 

Throughout his training, a recurrent theme emerged as surgeon after surgeon would say the same thing—the ultimate compliment in the world of orthopedic surgery: "You have good hands." With those good hands, Dr. Florence excelled in many of the subspecialties of orthopedic surgery, including sports medicine, joint replacements and fracture care. With such a diverse skill set, his focus could not be limited to only one orthopedic subspecialty. Instead, he confidently set out to provide excellent orthopedic care and started the Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine Service Line at Estes Park Health in 2010. This new service line has provided the residents of Estes Park with advanced, ultramodern orthopedic care without having to travel down to the Front Range.

In this capacity, Dr. Florence provides orthopedic care to various joints, including hips, knees, and shoulders. He performs surgical procedures, including arthroscopy, fracture care, and total joint replacements of the hips, knees, shoulders, and elbows. With his additional sports medicine training, he performs many other specialized surgeries in both the young and older injured athlete, including hip arthroscopy, rotator cuff repair, and ACL reconstruction.  He is both a Board Certified Orthopedic Surgeon and a Board Certified Orthopedic Sports Medicine Subspecialist.

Having grown up in a small Idaho town and living in the Midwest and New York, Dr. Florence, his wife, and five children are excited to be living in Estes Park.

 

 Achieving potential, conquering challenges-

Foothills Gateway focuses on empowerment

Foothills Gateway improves the lives of thousands of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families in Northern Colorado by helping them to conquer challenges and achieve their maximum potential. Since 1972, Foothills Gateway strives to empower every ability and highlight the achievements of the human spirit.  

Nathan Scott, the Community Outreach Specialist at Foothills Gateway, will be speaking to the club on Thursday, Feb. 21.  Scott will share with us the story of Foothills Gateway and Gateway’s mission of advocating for and empowering individuals with disabilities to lead lives of their choice.

Nathan Scott

Inspired by his work, Scott has been dedicated to Gateway’s vision of making a difference for every individual, regardless of age or ability, by providing a life of opportunity, of choice and of dignity. 

Raised along the Mississippi River, he served four years in the Navy. Afterwards, he joined AmeriCorps, and eventually, he studied at Marycrest International University and Western Illinois University, where he received a Masters in Communication. Upon completing his education, he spend more time with AmeriCorps in an executive role and taught English with Upward Bound through CSU. He remains committed to making a difference in his community.  

Dave Boon to share RYLA:
Rotary's youth leadership program 
 

A leader is one who compels others to positive action by the power of their own positive action.

Rocky Mountain RYLA (Rotary Youth Leadership Awards) is considered one of the leading youth leadership programs in the US and in the Rotary International world. RYLA is an intensive leadership experience organized by Rotary where students and young professionals from ages 14-30 can hone their leadership potential.

Dave Boon, heavily involved with RYLA since 2003, will be speaking to our club on Thursday, Feb. 14. Boon will present the amazing history of RYLA, YRYLA, and RYLA+ and update us on all the exciting things that RYLA does.

Dave Boon

The first RYLA in our Rotary District was held in !987 in Estes Park with 105 students. Today, annually, there are five youth leadership camps totaling over 700 male and female students.

Boon is a charter member of the Fort Collins Rotary After Work Club, is a two-time president, and is currently the Chair of the International Committee. Past winner of the RI Presidential “4-Avenues of Service Award,” he has been Chair of YRYLA, a senior counselor at RYLA and YRYLA, a speaker at RYLA events, and has been on the Rocky Mountain RYLA Board of Directors and their past president.  

He is the Executive Director of the Children’s Speech and Reading Center. He and his wife have a non-profit, Empowering Opportunities, that supports orphans and marginalized youth in Nepal. He remains passionate about helping youth.

Estes Park High School sophomores and juniors, with potential or proven leadership experience and who have excelled in one or more areas of high school involvement, are encouraged to apply to attend the five day RYLA conference. Seventh graders may apply to the YRYLA (Young RYLA) conference.  Also, physically-challenged teens may apply for the RYLA Plus conference.

 

Harmony fosters journey to recovery

Christopher Reveley, MD, Medical Director for Harmony Foundation, will be speaking to the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Feb. 7, at their regular noon meeting. The title of his talk is “What do we do that has real and lasting value?”

Dr. Christopher Reveley

Harmony Foundation offers a comprehensive approach to recovery from alcohol and drug addiction. To accomplish this, residents and their families are invited to begin a collaborative process in a peaceful mountain setting.  

Born in New Jersey, Dr. Reveley attended college in Boulder while living for long stretches in Yosemite Valley. From 1975-1982, he lived in Estes Park, teaching rock climbing, guiding climbs, working at the Longs Peak station for the National Park Service, and involved in search and rescue.

He attended medical school at Dartmouth, residency in Rochester, NY, and practiced anesthesiology for 20 years. In 2016, he completed a Fellowship in Addiction Medicine and has been the Medical Director at Harmony Foundation since.

Fourth Thursday Committee Meetings
 
Check the bottom of your newsletter to see which committees you've chosen for this Rotary year. Was it Financial Development? Community Service? International Service? Youth/New Generations/Vocational Service? Membership? Programs? Club Administration? 
 
Plan to meet in a small group of your choice after lunch this week. You are welcome to join any committee at any time!
 
Directors/Committees
Fund Development - Karen Thompson
International Service - Ron Gordon
Membership - Bill Solms
Community Service - Roger Thorp
Youth/New Generations - Sue Fereday
Programs - Rick Taylor
Club Administration - Karol Rinehart
 
This week's program: 911 for 911 
Nonprofit supports first responders

 

Karen Mosier Nicholson, mental health consultant, will be speaking to the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, January 17. She will be presenting on 911 for 911.

The mission of 911 for 911, a non-profit organization, is to address the mental health needs of first responders across Colorado. The goal is to help first responders to continue to serve their communities and thrive in their personal lives, without suffering from the trauma left behind by their compounded work histories.

Karen Mosier Nicholson

911 for 911 is building services to complement the existing comprehensive peer support programs already provided, which will include a first responder-specific residential treatment facility located in northern Colorado.

Nicholson has been a part of the Weld/Larimer/Boulder Crisis Intervention Teams (CIT) since 2004. She is a mental health consultant for the Hostage Negotiations Team of Larimer County Sheriff’s Office and responds to calls in Boulder County through the Longs Peak Crisis Negotiators, as well as in Weld County. In addition, Nicholson has instructed Colorado State University law enforcement and lectured at the annual Ranger Excellence School on identifying and de-escalating psychiatric crisis.

Furthermore, Nicholson is a Licensed Professional Counselor, Fellow in the American College of Healthcare Executives, and Fellow in the American College of Medical Practice Executives. She has over 20 years of experience as a clinician and in hospital administration.

Meet the docs: EP Health's new staff

Five newly hired physicians, now working at Estes Park Health, have been invited to speak to the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Jan. 10, at their regular noon meeting. They will be introducing themselves and discussing their areas of clinical interest and experience.

Dr. Patricia Aldridge, Board Certified in Pediatric Critical Care, has 18 years of experience in pediatric critical care medicine and pediatric cardiac critical care. She has started a general pediatric practice in Estes Park. She states, “I like when parents take ownership of their kids’ health and stay informed. I like to share my knowledge and make recommendations then decide as a team the best way to proceed.”

Dr. Patricia Aldridge

Dr. Joseph Lee, Board Certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine, has served as staff and locum tenens physician and hospitalist in Arizona, Colorado, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon, and Virginia. He states, “I want my patients to know about their health and then let them decide where to go from there.”

Dr. Joseph Lee

Dr. Juli Schneider, Board Certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine, specializes in internal and hospital medicine. She states, “I want my patients to know that I will be their fierce advocate.”

Dr. Juli Schneider

In addition, the Rural Physicians Group has been hired to furnish hospitalists and surgicalists to Estes Park Health. Hospitalists are internal medicine and family medicine physicians who rotate through Estes Park to provide all inpatient medical care at Estes Park Health. Hospitalists coordinate and direct hospital care, communicate with specialists, and are the point of contact for questions and updates for family members.

Surgicalists are Board Certified general surgeons who, likewise, rotate through Estes Park to provide hospital and outpatient surgical services. The surgicalist program will allow patients to have general surgery in Estes Park and remain closer to home.

E.V. Restorative Justice helps build, repair relationships, foster respect 
 

Because living in a peaceable community improves the quality of life for all, Estes Valley Restorative Justice Partnership (EVRJP) facilitates innovative proactive and responsive programs that empower the entire community to engage in the restorative principles of respect, repair, responsibility, reconciliation, reintegration and relationship. 

EVRJP believes that relationships form the heart of the community. When those relationships are based on respect and understanding, everyone benefits. EVRJP helps build and repair relationships.

Denise Lord, Program Coordinator with the Estes Valley Restorative Justice Partnership, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Jan. 3. She will discuss her work with at-risk youth and adult populations in both education and restorative practices.

Denise Lord

Lord’s involvement in restorative justice began in 2007 through Eagle Rock School & Professional Development Center, where she facilitated community group conferences, circles and mediation. She served on the school's discipline committee and coordinated the school’s restorative justice program. 

In 2014, Denise began volunteering with EVRJP through the Community Group Conference program, serving initially as a community member and then as a trained facilitator. In 2015, she took on the role of Program Coordinator. 

Lord has a BA in International and Area Studies and Spanish Language and Literature, holds a Colorado K-12 teaching credential, and is a trained mediator.  

Outside of work, Denise volunteers with Partners Mentoring Youth, the Estes Park Thanksgiving Community Gathering, and The Estes Park Learning Place, where she serves on the board. In her free time, she enjoys hiking, camping, playing ultimate frisbee, cooking and reading.

This week: Come celebrate the holidays!
 
Our program this week will be music by Great Blue and a Christmas sing-a-long. A festive holiday lunch buffet, starting with Mimosas, has been arranged.
 

Great Blue

Great Blue is a musical duo using two voices, guitars and mandolin to weave a fabric of eclectic tunes that warm the heart and feed the soul. Shirl Lawrence and Steve Kaplan have been singing together for more than three decades in the Hudson River Valley. They are now based in the Rockies of Northern Colorado. Their beautifully crafted music has been heard at coffeehouses and festivals as a duo, and also as members of the Hudson River Sloop Singers and the Walkabout Chorus. Audiences can count on being touched by their carefully prepared harmonies and the powerful lyrics they use to grace them with.

Additionally on Thursday, election of officers will take place at a brief special meeting. Cast your vote for next year's club and foundation leaders.

 

This will be our last meeting in 2018. See you in January!

Songs of the season to bring joy Dec. 13

Mountain Echoes, the Estes Park Elementary School Choir, will sing at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Dec. 13, at their regular noon meeting. Their singing will help us celebrate the holidays. Visitors, family and friends are welcome to come and enjoy the program.

Mountain Echoes is an after-school choir for students in third through fifth grades at the Estes Park Elementary School. They meed weekly to rehearse. The choir is directed by Mrs. Jenna Williams and accompanied by Mr. Mike Williams.

  

For the past two years, they auditioned and were chosen to sing the national anthem for a Rockies baseball game. Also, they have sung the National Anthem for a local boy’s varsity basketball game. In November, they sang holiday songs for the Estes Park Tree Lighting Ceremony, and have several more performances coming up.

Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world.  There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 35,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas.  Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, disease, clean water, hunger, illiteracy and poverty.

The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays in the Timberline Conference Room at the Ridgeline Hotel in Estes Park, 101 S. Saint Vrain Avenue. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend.  Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 

Rotary program: microfinance, social business

What's it all about? Find out Thursday

Janet Hay, member of the Rotary Club of Canterbury, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Dec. 6, at their regular noon meeting. She will talk about micro-finance and the concept of social business, which is revolutionizing current thought about charitable giving.

Janet Hay with Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus, Bangladeshi social entrepreneur, banker, economist, and civil society leader who founded the Grameen Bank and pioneered the concepts of micro-credit and micro-finance.
 

Hay started her working life as a stage and production manager and moved into special event management. She then spent 10 years in her own business as a property developer and investor. 

In 2010, she went to work on Christmas Island, an Australian territory in the Indian Ocean, northwest of Australia. While there, she was responsible for looking after asylum seekers, mostly from Iran and Iraq, who arrived by boat from Indonesia. She had various roles on the island including welfare officer, teacher and asylum boat receiving team member. She was present the day such a boat sank in rough seas, killing over 50 people.

She then moved to Nauru, located in the Pacific Ocean northeast of Australia and the world’s third smallest country, and to Manus Island, an island northeast of Papua New Guinea. While there, she worked for the Salvation Army, until the government cancelled their contract.

In 2015, Hay decided to go back to school and completed her Master’s Degree in International Co-operation and Humanitarian Aid. During her study, she was influenced by the concepts of micro-finance and social business.

Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 35,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, disease, clean water, hunger, illiteracy and poverty.

The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays in the Timberline Conference Room at the Ridgeline Hotel in Estes Park, located at 101 South Saint Vrain Avenue. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m.. 

Kevin Mullin's program will update club
on E.P. Health Foundation activities
 

The Estes Park Health Foundation remains committed to improving the health of the people in the Estes Valley. Specifically, its goals include raising funds to support the capital and operational needs of Estes Park Health, to build and steward its endowment in order to ensure future financial sustainability, and to raise community awareness of the important work done by Estes Park Health.

Kevin L. Mullin, Executive Director of the Estes Park Health Foundation, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Nov. 15, at the regular noon meeting. He will provide an update on The Foundation’s activities.  

Kevin L. Mullin

The Foundation is the fundraising arm of Estes Park Health. In this role, Mullin provides leadership and management to The Foundation, focusing mainly on fundraising. Kevin has served in this capacity since March 2016. 

Mullin has over 20 years of experience in nonprofit management and fundraising, having previously served in roles with the American Red Cross, Inner City Health Center, and the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. He has a B.S. Degree in Business Administration from Regis University and holds the Certified Fund Raising Executive (CFRE) designation. He also earned a Master of Nonprofit Management degree and a Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit Capacity Building from Regis, and is a graduate of the Institute for Leaders in Development at the University of Denver.  

In addition, he serves on the Boards of the North Colorado Medical Center, The Elizabeth Guild, and the Denver African American Philanthropists (DAAP). Kevin serves on committees with the Colorado Planned Giving Roundtable.  

Kevin is originally from Fresno, CA, and is the father of Kevin L. Mullin Jr., who is a student at Western Washington University preparing for a career in Philanthropy. Kevin enjoys domestic and international travel, downhill skiing, fast cars and learning about technology. He also plays softball and volleyball, and is currently (slowly) learning to play golf.

Rotary District Governor to visit our club

Chuck Rutenberg, Governor of Rotary District 5440, will speak at the regular Thursday meeting of the Rotary Club of Estes Park on November 8.  His district includes 53 Rotary clubs in Wyoming, Northwern Colorado, Eastern Idaho and Western Nebraska.
 
 D. G. Chuck Rutenberg
 
The R.I. theme for the year is Be the Inspiration!  DG Chuck is expected to focus on the People of Action Campaign for Rotary International and the difference that Rotarians make in their community. The theme is meant to put focus on all the projects and activities that the Estes Park club accomplishes, both locally and internationally. Opportunities are plentiful for potential members, young and old, to help Rotary achieve its mission of “peace and understanding throughout the world,” and by bringing their passion for service to their communities.
 
Rutenberg joined the Rotary Club of Fort Collins in 2001 and served as president in 2007-08. In 2007, he was honored as Rotarian of the Year for District 5440 and has received many club honors, including the 5 Areas of Service and the Spirit of Rotary awards. He is a multiple Paul Harris Award and Bequest Society member. He also served as president of Rocky Mountain RYLA and chair of RYLA and YRYLA. He served as assistant district governor 2010-13, serving the four Greeley clubs.
 
Chuck served as President of the Board for SAINT INC, an alternative transportation organization for seniors in Fort Collins and Loveland, and as the President of the Board for Care Housing Inc., a non-profit organization providing affordable housing in Fort Collins and Windsor, for three years. He spent 31 years working for two Fortune 500 companies and retired this year after 16 years in the financial services industry.
 
He has been married to Lynn for 34 years. They have a son and three daughters, as well as seven grandchildren. Chuck likes to hike, play golf and is also a nature photographer.
Rotary Quote of the Week
 
"November is Foundation Month in the Rotary world and a time when we focus on our foundation. For me that means thinking about all the good our donations does in our communities and around the world. Like most Rotarians, I get great joy from charitable giving…sharing my material blessings with the foundation to make this world better.
 
So I’m asking you think about the good made possible by your donation and Be The Inspiration to your family and community by giving generously throughout the year to our foundation. It feels wonderful, it's the ultimate in enlightened self-interest and it's the right thing to do."
 

  - District 5440 Governor 2018-19 Chuck Rutenberg

  
Come and learn about Estes Park's Explorer Post 911
 
This week's program will be on the Estes Park Explorer Post 911. Our speaker, Richard Ralph, is the unit commissioner for Explorer Post 911. He will will provide a general perspective on Scouting and specific information regarding Scouting in Estes Park.
 
Richard Ralph
 
Rick has 15 years of experience as a volunteer adult leader in Boy Scouts. As Assistant Scoutmaster, he created and directed a program for patrol formation and initial rank advancement for new Scouts. As Scoutmaster, he revitalized a troop which enabled an above average number Scouts to earn the rank of Eagle Scout. As Unit Commissioner, Rick has served Cub Scout packs, Boy Scout troops, and now Explorer Post 911. 
 
 
 
Rick and his wife Joan are originally from the upper Midwest. Rick’s career in electric power generation included roles in engineering, operations, and project management. In 2005 Rick was a team member that received R&D Magazine’s R&D 100 Award for ultrasonic cleaning of nuclear fuel, a new technology that safely removes deposits from irradiated fuel assemblies in nuclear power plants.

Rick and his family are long-time visitors to Estes Park. He and his wife recently moved here, thereby fulfilling a dream.  
 Anonymous memorial gift to Polio Plus honors three members, amazes club
 
There were some gasps and some tears at Thursday's meeting as members reacted to this message to our club from Rotary International:
 
Dear President David Evans,
Greetings from the Rotary Foundation! I wanted to alert you of a recent donation from a member of your club to the PolioPlus Fund. While the donor wishes to remain anonymous, the gift has been made in honor of late Rotarians Jim “J.R.” Robertson, Ron Kuhns, and Rob Ludlum. 
 
      
 
Because of the generous support of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, this gift will translate into $75,000 for polio eradication activities, including immunization and surveillance around the world.
In light of the upcoming World Polio Day fundraising festivities, the donor would like an announcement to be made close to October 24th to acknowledge the impact Rotarians can have towards eradicating polio worldwide.
On behalf the Rotary Foundation, we thank your club for its continued support of Rotary.
Kindly,
Christena Swartz, Major Donor Coordinator | Donor Services and Support, Rotary International
 
The announcement came just days before observance of Wold Polio Day on Wednesday, Oct. 24. In addition to this incredibly generous donation by one club members, we can all make a difference in our own ways.
  • Place dollars, change, checks into one of the two dozen donation jars in local businesses. Karen Thompson and her committee have placed  with the End Polio Now logo in businesses across town. Please help fill them! Encourage your friends to give between now and Oct. 24.
  • Go to endpolio.org and make a tax-deductible donation.
“Our club wanted to raise awareness of the worldwide campaign to eradicate this horrible disease, said Karen Thompson, Fund Development Chair. “With the 2:1 match, every $1 contributed becomes $3, thanks to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. It’s awesome to think that polio can be eradicated in our lifetime, but it will still take millions of dollars and many years to make it a reality.”  
 
Background facts on Rotary’s work to end polio
  1. From the launch of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative in 1988, more than 17.4 million people, mainly in the developing world, who would otherwise have been paralyzed, are walking because they have been immunized against polio. More than 650,000 paralytic cases of polio are now prevented every year. 
  2. If polio is not eradicated, within 10 years, as many as 200,000 children could be paralyzed by it each year. A polio-free world will be a safer world for children everywhere. 
  3. The number of polio cases has declined by more than 99.9 percent from over 350,000 in 1985 to 22 in 2017. 
  4. Since 1988, the number of polio endemic countries declined from over 125 countries to three in 2017 (Nigeria, Pakistan, Afghanistan). 
  5. Rotary is the leader of a coalitionto advocate for increased contributions by the US Government to global polio eradication. The other members include the United Nations Foundation, Task Force for Global Health, US Fund for UNICEF, American Academy of Pediatrics and March of Dimes. 
  6. There are three types of wild poliovirus. Type 2 wild poliovirus last occurred in October 1999 and was certified eradicated in September 2015. Type 3 wild poliovirus has not been found since November 2012, suggesting that only Type 1 wild poliovirus continues to circulate. 
  7. By the time the world is certified polio-free, Rotary’s contributions to the global polio eradication effort will exceed $2.2 billion, including $985 million in matching funds from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Rotary’s contribution to the Global Polio Eradication Initiative since 1988 accounts for nearly 14 percent of all contributions through June 2017 and represents approximately 42 percent of private sector contributions. 
  8. Donate at endpolio.org
  9. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation will match Rotary’s commitment 2:1. 

Paramedic presenter to discuss defibrillators 

Erle Collom, paramedic with Estes Park Health, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Oct. 18, at their regular noon meeting. He will explain emergency defibrillators.

Erle Collom

Collom is a critical care paramedic and shift supervisor with Estes Park Health for over 20 years.  Along with his paramedic job, Erle has been the Chief Medical Officer with the Allenspark Fire Department for 27 years.

Recognized for his easy to understand approach to teaching, he has been named the “Master of High Performance CPR” by his peers.

Astronaut Loren Shriver presents Oct. 11 on a lifelong interest in exploring space
 
Col. Loren James Shriver, NASA astronaut, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Oct. 11, at the noon meeting. He will share with us his lifetime interest in space exploration.
 
Shriver received a Bachelor of Science degree in Aeronautical Engineering from the United States Air Force Academy in 1967, and a Master of Science degree in Astronautical Engineering from Purdue University in 1968.
 
Loren Shriver
 
First commissioned in 1967, Shriver served from 1967 to 1973 as a T-38 academic instructor pilot at Vance Air Force Base, Oklahoma. In 1973, he was assigned to an overseas tour in Thailand. In 1975, he attended the United States Air Force Test Pilot School at Edwards Air Force Base, California. In 1976, he began serving as a test pilot for the F-15 Joint Test Force.
 
Selected as an astronaut by NASA in January 1978, Shriver participated in three space flights, and logged over 386 hours in space. He was the pilot of STS-51-C, launched from Kennedy Space Center on January 24, 1985. He commanded a crew of five on his second mission, STS-31, which launched on April 24, 1990. This five-day flight deployed the Hubble Space Telescope. Also, he commanded mission STS-46 in 1992. Most recently, he served as the Space Shuttle Program Manager for Launch Integration and the Deputy Director for Launch and Payload Processing at Kennedy Space Center, FL.

Over his career, Shriver has received numerous awards and honors, including the United States Air Force Distinguished Flying Cross and the NASA Distinguished Service Medal. He has been inducted into the Astronaut Hall of Fame. He and his wife reside in Estes Park. They have four children.
Oct. 4 program by LWV speaker
will highlight mid-term elections
 
Bonnie Seals, member of the Estes Park League of Women Voters will headline our program this week. Her topic will be the mid-term elections.
 
Bonnie Seals is the Communications Chair of the Estes Park League of Women Voters. Bonnie retired in 2012 after a 35-year career as an actuary, practicing in retirement plan consulting. She graduated with a degree in Actuarial Science from Georgia State University, and is a Fellow of the Society of Actuaries. Before moving to Estes Park after her retirement, Bonnie lived in Atlanta, GA, Memphis, TN, and Louisville, KY as well as a 2-year temporary assignment in Wellington, New Zealand. Bonnie has been married to Gordon for 41 years and has 2 sons.
 
Bonnie Seals

EVFPD's John Jerome to present

Sept. 20 on fire prevention strategies

The Estes Valley was protected by the Estes Park Volunteer Fire Department from 1907 through 2010. In 2010, the Estes Valley Fire Protection District was formed.The mission of the Estes Valley Fire Protection District is to continue to provide the Estes Valley with superior fire prevention, fire protection, and emergency services.

John Jerome, the new Fire Marshall and Division Chief of Prevention, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, September 20. He will discuss fire prevention strategies and the Estes Valley Fire Protection District.

John Jerome

Jerome started his fire service career in 1993 as a volunteer firefighter in Rancho Santa Fe, California. In 2000, he transitioned his primary focus from Operations to Prevention  as a Fire Prevention Specialist for Rancho Santa Fe. Subsequently, he served as the campus Fire Marshal for Embry-Riddle University in Prescott, Arizona from 2014 to 2018.  

In March 2018, John Jerome was sworn in as the new Fire Marshal and Division Chief of Prevention for the Estes Valley Fire Protection District. He brings a diverse background in suppression, prevention, investigation, training, fire service management, and community risk reduction. As head of the Prevention Division, he will be responsible for plan reviews and inspections, code enforcement, public education, and fire prevention.

He has an A.A. in Telecommunications and A.S. in Fire Science from Palomar College, and a B.S. in Fire Administration from Cogswell College. He has received many awards and accolades, including the 2012 Fire and Life Safety Educator of the Year award from San Diego County Fire Chiefs Association.

Sept. 13 program - Via Mobility Services

Via is a private, nonprofit organization that provides transportation and mobility options that enable its customers to live a more self-sufficient and independent life.  Via was established in 1979 as a private, nonprofit organization to coordinate an efficient, cost-effective and accessible transportation system for seniors and people with disabilities. Currently, it provides transportation and mobility options to 19 communities in five counties in Colorado.

Lisa Curtis, Via’s Community Engagement and Business Development Officer, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, September 13. She will discuss Via Mobility Services (Via) in Boulder and Estes Park.

Lisa Curtis

Curtis works with community stakeholders to ensure that Via is providing quality client services that have beneficial and measurable impacts. Also, she coordinates with other human services providers to more efficiently deliver services. In addition, she leads Via’s fundraising efforts from grants and private giving. Furthermore, she is responsible for diversifying Via’s revenue-generating contracts and developing new business services.

Curtis received her BA in English, her JD from Tulane University Law School, and an MFA from The University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop. As a practicing attorney in New Orleans, she was a Vice President and Senior Staff Attorney for a large financial institution.

Safe water: this week's program
 
This week's program will will address the work of the Waterborne Diseases Prevention Branch at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to help increase access safe water and improved hygiene in households, schools, and healthcare facilities across the developing world. This work has depended heavily on valued partnerships, notably Rotary International and local chapters, including the Rotary Club of Estes Park. Our speaker will be Robert Quick, MD, MPH. 
 
Robert Quick
 
Quick is a medical epidemiologist in the Waterborne Diseases Prevention Branch at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He received his medical training at the University of California, San Francisco, obtained an MPH from the University of California, Berkeley, completed residencies in family practice and preventive medicine, and worked as medical director and clinician at the Indian Health Service hospital in Bethel, Alaska. 
 
For the past 28 years, Quick has worked at CDC, conducting research on the etiology, control, and prevention of enteric diseases in the developing world. His work on cholera in Latin America and Africa revealed the seriousness and extent of the problem of lack of access to safe water and sanitation in the developing world and inspired a research focus on waterborne diseases and their prevention. With colleagues at CDC and the Pan American Health Organization, he developed the Safe Water System, a simple, inexpensive household-based water quality intervention, and has conducted field trials in Latin America, Africa, and Asia to establish the evidence base regarding its use and dissemination (www.cdc.gov/safewater). More recently, he has conducted field trials of other water treatment technologies, and has designed, implemented and evaluated projects that integrate water treatment technologies, handwashing and other public health interventions (including micronutrient Sprinkles, improved cookstoves, HIV counseling and testing, rapid syphilis screening and inexpensive handwashing stations) with maternal and child health services, school programs, and HIV care and support services. To carry out this work in the developing world, he has collaborated with numerous partners from the public and private sectors, Rotary Club, non-governmental organizations, UN agencies, and academic institutions.
 Cheley Colorado Camps
-a tradition since 1921

 

Cheley Colorado Camps were founded in 1921 by Frank Cheley and moved to its current location in 1926. The Camps are now under the leadership of the fourth generation of Cheley descendants. Cheley Camps are a private camp in Estes Park for children ages 9-17. The camps’ program instructs young people to respect the environment and their surroundings, teaches environmentally sound camping practices and builds lasting character and resiliency.  

Cheley Camps have been able to accomplish its goals through a partnership with the National Parks and National Forests. Many campers have discovered the Estes Valley through first coming to Cheley as a young camper, only to return as an adult to make Estes their home.

Don Cheley, Director Emeritus for Cheley Camps, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Aug. 16, at their regular noon meeting. 

Don Cheley

Raised in Denver and Estes, Cheley graduated from Menlo School of Business Administration. He worked for various businesses and served in the Air National Guard. Eventually, he became the third-generation executive director, following in the footsteps of his father and grandfather.

He is the past president of the Western Association of Independent Camps, national president of the American Camp Association, chair of the American Camp Foundation, board of the Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors, Board of the Bank of Estes Park, past president of the Rocky Mountain Conservancy, and America’s Ambassador to the International Camping Fellowship.

Congratulations! 
2018-19 Foundation Directors
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park Foundation elected the following officers July 19:  
Madison Casey, President
Harriette Woodard,  Vice President 
Gregg Jurgens, Treasurer
Dennis Gellhaus, Secretary
Jack Boatman, Grants Manager and Ernie Altick Coordinator
Marsha Yelick, Investment Advisor (non-trustee)
Harriette Woodard, Scholarship Coordinator
Kathy Groesbeck, Board Liaison
Travel to China with Rene Moquin and Global Volunteers this week

Rene Moquin will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Aug. 9, at the regular noon meeting. Moquin has participated with Global Volunteers, teaching English as a secondary language and doing community development work in Cuba, Poland, Africa, China and Vietnam. His presentation involves his recent work in China.

Rene Moquin

Prior to Global Volunteers, Rene volunteered for a number of years in installing water wells in Africa, and also, he spent two years working with refugees in Southeast Asia. This fall, Rene will return to East Africa to continue his work.  

In Estes Park, Rene was involved in the noon Rotary Club, serving as chairman and The Big Duck for the annual duck race two years ago. In addition, he has served on a number of local boards.

Program: Nehemiah-Gateway's mission, projects, collaboration with our club
 

Nehemiah-Gateway focuses on helping others to help themselves and to foster and create sustainable structures. Started in 1991, Nehemiah has implemented many projects in Albania, such as first-aid clinics, repair shops, soup kitchens, day care centers, and educational institutions from kindergarten to university. Since then, this work has spread to other parts of the world.

Sarah Pita, Development Director for Nehemiah-Gateway USA, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Aug. 2, at their regular noon meeting. Pita will discuss Nehemiah Gateway’s well-established humanitarian and educational work in Albania. In addition, she will talk about the summer camp for Roma youth that Estes Park Rotary is sponsoring this year as well as other upcoming Nehemiah-Gateway collaborations.

Sarah Pita

Albania is a southern European country with a unique language and culture, in a spectacular natural setting. Recently, Pita had the opportunity to learn first-hand about Nehemiah-Gateway’s work in Albania.

After earning a Bachelor of Arts in Russian Language and Literature from Swarthmore College, Pita went on to receive her Master of Arts in Law and Diplomacy from the Fletcher School at Tufts University. Since then, she has lived all over the world, including Europe, Asia, and the United States.

For the last 12 years, Pita has lived with her husband and two children in the Estes Valley. Over that time, she has helped many nonprofit organizations in the Estes Valley to grow their programs and capacity through her expertise in grant writing and fundraising. A lifelong writer, she is passionate about using her skills to help organizations that are making a positive difference in the world.

Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 35,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century, initiating projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, disease, clean water, hunger, illiteracy, and poverty.

The Rotary Club of Estes Park has moved to its new location, meeting Thursdays in the Timberline Conference Room at the Ridgeline Hotel in Estes Park, located at 101 South Saint Vrain Ave.  Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 

Roger Thorp - Rotarian of the Year 
 
Thanks to Gregg Jurgens for sharing his words of praise for our 2018 Rotarian of the Year, Roger Thorp. Gregg presented Roger's award at the July 12 club meeting.
 
Roger Thorp, 2018 Rotarian of the Year, received his award from 2017 winner Gregg Jurgens
 
Our Rotarian of the year award winner has been a member of our club since 1976, the same year he started his local business and also our first major flood.

As a member of our club he has served in several positions. Currently as Community Services Director, where he has planned, coordinated and executed several projects to benefit our community. Current projects include the community café, The Library outside reading area, cleaning and preserving the Welcome to Estes Park Rock Sign, he also found time to rehab the shelter by Lake Estes. The same shelter our club built years ago.

He has helped bring together our Rotary Club, Duck Race and Duck Central with Delaware North. By doing this he convinced Delaware North to provide in-kind contributions to the Duck Race a new home for Duck Central and a Thank you Luncheon for all Sponsors.
 
His commitment to doing it right and fair continued into his business, winning the “Architect of the Year” award from the American Institute of Architects, numerous awards for Designs and was featured on the cover of The Colorado Architect.  He has also won the President’s Award for Design and Land Stewardship for his work on Performance Park Pavilion and a portion of EPURA Riverwalk.  One only has to google his name to find pages of awards!
 
We are lucky to have him step up for another term on the Board as Director of Community Service.
 
Thank you for 42 years of service to our Club!

Stan Crader, author of Stihl American,

will present this week's program

Stan Crader, writer, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, July 12, at their regular noon meeting. Crader came of age watching Stihl emerge from a little known brand in America to become the world’s best-selling outdoor power tool brand. He will share his observations of the people who pioneered Stihl in America, which he wrote about in “Stihl American,” his first non-fiction book.

Stan Crader

Crader was born and raised in rural Missouri, which provided him material and rich characters for his novels. While growing up, his jobs included paper routes, mowing lawns, grocery store carry out, farm equipment, sawmills, small engine mechanic, and janitor. He found that he learned a great deal about people from their grocery purchases and how they care for their lawns and equipment.

Stan is known for the unusual. Once he caught a bat at a Cardinal baseball game, he flew the Atlantic in a Cessna, and his grandfather filmed him jumping a creek on a motorcycle. He was elected city councilman of his hometown, which gave him a new respect for those that serve as volunteers in small towns.

He attended the University of Missouri, where he met his wife. They raised their three boys in Southeast Missouri and boast six grandchildren.  Currently, he is president of Crader Distributing, Stihl’s oldest and largest independent distributor.

Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 35,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century.  Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, disease, clean water, hunger, illiteracy and poverty.

The Rotary Club of Estes Park has moved to its new location, meeting Thursdays in the Timberline Conference Room at the Ridgeline Hotel in Estes Park, 101 South Saint Vrain Ave. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 

 

Please Note: Our July 5 meeting will be in Salon F at The Ridgeline Hotel. 

This week's program-

Jupiter’s Wife:  A Narrative of the Juno Mission to Jupiter

On July 4, 2016, a room full of NASA scientists and engineers waited with bated breaths as the Juno spacecraft executed a highly choreographed maneuver that would place it into orbit around the planet Jupiter. A successful execution of the maneuver would begin the unprecedented observing campaign for 32 orbits past Jupiter’s northern and southern poles, whereas a dire error had the potential to send the spacecraft flying past Jupiter into the depths of interplanetary space.

Lori Spalsbury, member of the Juno Team at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, July 5, at their regular noon meeting. Spalsbury will bring to life the feats of engineering and the scientific challenges that drove the Juno Mission in its hugely successful quest to unveil the mysteries of our solar system.

Lori Spalsbury

An Estes Park native and 2005 high school graduate, Lori spent her childhood admiring the clear night skies of the Rocky Mountains. She went on to attend the California Institute of Technology (B.S. 2009) and later the University of Maine (M.S. 2013). While completing her studies, she contributed to a variety of scientific studies, including galaxy evolution analysis, sun-grazing comet observations, lunar exosphere measurements and solar dynamo simulations.  

Upon completion of her graduate degree, Lori joined the Juno Magnetometer Team at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, where she has served as the Instrument Operations Lead for the Fluxgate Magnetometer and Advanced Stellar Compass instruments for the past four years.

Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world.There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 35,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, disease, clean water, hunger, illiteracy, and poverty.

The Rotary Club of Estes Park has moved to its new location, meeting Thursdays at The Ridgeline Hotel in Estes Park, 101 South Saint Vrain Avenue. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 

New year, leadership, goals 
 
The traditional changing of the guard program for the Rotary Club of Estes Park introduced award winners and new club and foundation board members.  Held at The Ridgeline Hotel on June 21, the 92-year old club celebrated the accomplishments of 2017-18 and welcomed the new Rotary year, which begins July 1.
 
“Every past president has been a mentor and advisor to me, and I thank them,” 2017-18 President Kathy Groesbeck said. “It has meant so much to be president, and I have loved every minute of it,” said added. She noted that year was marked with “challenges and changes” as the club grieved the deaths of seven members, conducted a search for a new weekly meeting location and hosted a Rotary district conference on Duck Race weekend.
 
 
Groesbeck recognized former club presidents in attendance that evening, including Jay Harroff, Thor Homme, Scott Thompson and Pete Sumey. Groesbeck welcomed special guests, Audrey TeSelle and Ann Dinsmoor, whose late husbands Ken TeSelle and Jack Dinsmoor, died during the past year. Additionally, she thanked District 5440 Assistant Governor Linda Vomaske for attending.
 
Club member Chuck Bonza presented the Distinguished Service Award to Thor Homme, whose leadership has been a model for other club members. Bonza praised Homme for “continuing to jump in wherever needed” by the club. His contributions include Duck Race Committee Chair (Big Duck), club president and foundation president. Bonza noted that whenever help is needed with community service projects, Homme is there to lend a hand. In accepting, Homme thanked his wife Darlene for her support.
 
 
Groesbeck presented The Legacy Award to Wayne Andersen, a club member for 18 years, for embodying the spirit of Rotary. She noted his leadership of the Salvation Army bell ringing campaign for several years, his great sense of humor, his weekly service as lunch ticket coordinator, his record-setting year as Big Duck in 2007 and his role as duck wrangler. 
 
 
Two additional awards, the Rotarian of the Year and the Spirit Award, will be presented at upcoming meetings because the recipients were unable to attend the June 21 event. 
 
Membership Director Scott Thompson recognized Guy Van der Werf with a sponsor pin for serving as a mentor to new member Dennis Gellhaus Guy's wife Leslie presented the pin .
 
.
 
Outgoing Rotary Club of Estes Park Foundation President Thor Homme recognized his board and thanked them for their hard work during the 2017-18 year on the community grants program and major grants benefitting the library and a summer camp for disadvantaged children in Albania. Foundation board members include: Marsha Yelick, Gregg Jurgens, Harriette Woodard, Jack Boatman, Debbie Delaney, Dave Evans and Kathy Groesbeck. Incoming foundation board members include Dave Evans, Kathy Groesbeck, Gregg Jurgens, Harriette Woodard, Jack Boatman, Virgil Holtgrewe, Dennis Gellhaus and Madison Casey.
 
Groesbeck recognized her 2017-18 board members: Longley Parker, treasurer; Rita DuChateau, secretary; Bill Solms, sergeant-at-arms; Dave Evans, president-elect; Sue Fereday, Youth, New Generations director; Thor Homme, foundation liaison; Doug Mann, international service director; Karol Rinehart, club administrative director; Karen Thompson, fund development director; Scott Thompson, membership director; Roger Thorp, community service director.
 
 
As her last order of business, Groesbeck presented the leadership gavel to incoming President Dave Evans, along with a badge and pin denoting his presidency. Evans thanked her for leading the club through a difficult year with her endless energy. He further recognized Groesbeck for her efforts to build a relationship with Delaware North, parent company of The Ridgeline Hotel, which enhanced the Duck Race. Evans presented Groesbeck with a Paul Harris Fellowship in recognition of her presidency, along with a badge and pin.
 
 
    
 
Evans welcomed members of the 2018-19 club board. Rita DuChateau, Sue Fereday, Longley Parker, Karol Rinehart, Karen Thompson and Roger Thorp will remain in their current positions. New board positions include: Ron Gordon, director of international service; Kathy Groesbeck, foundation liaison; Thor Homme, sergeant at arms; Doug Mann, president-elect; and Bill Solms, membership director.
 
 
Evans pledged to devote his year to increasing club membership, fundraising efforts and capacity to meet grant requests. He said while clubs often fall into a “vicious circle” when facing challenges, he would like to turn that into “a virtuous circle” that capitalizes on the “commitment to service that is in our DNA” as Rotarians. He referred to the club’s rich history in the area of scholarships and community support through grants and the Duck Race and emphasized his commitment to maintaining programs despite declining membership.
 
“I think we are capable of doing even more,” he said.
President's Night celebrates Rotary year
Dinner, music, awards this week
 
We Rotarians get so busy with our weekly meetings, community service projects and special fundraising events that it's important to set aside an evening to reflect, celebrate and thank those who worked so hard to make the current Rotary year a success. We will also introduce next year's officers and directors.The highlight of the evening will be several special awards, top secret until the moment of presentation. This year's awards are introduced by last year's recipients, so it's sure to be entertaining.
 
Come and mingle with club members and their guests at 5:30 p.m. with musical accompaniment by our own Madison Casey. Enjoy dinner at 6 p.m. The program follows at 7 p.m. 
 
This is our first President's Night at The Ridgeline Hotel - let's take the time to celebrate The Rotary Club of Estes Park!
 
2018-19 Rotary Theme
Flood recovery -past and future
EP Watershed Coalition Coordinator
to present this week's program

Lindsay McFarland, Coordinator for the Estes Park Watershed Coalition, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, June 7, at their regular noon meeting. The Coalition was recently recognized for the 2018 Larimer County Environmental Stewardship Award. McFarland will be discussing the Coalition’s efforts in flood recovery as well as the future of the Estes Valley Watershed.

Lindsay McFarland

McFarland is a graduate of the University of Iowa with a degree in Environmental Science-Geoscience. During her time at the University, Iowa had its own catastrophic flood. This flood defined McFarland’s career path as she soon started working in Urban Stormwater Management and flood mitigation.  

Having grown up visiting her grandparents in Estes Park, Lindsay felt the pain and struggles as Estes Park flooded in 2013. After her graduation, she spent a year in Iowa as a Watershed Coordinator in Scott County before moving to Estes Park to assist with our flood recovery.

Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 35,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century.  Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, disease, clean water, hunger, illiteracy, and poverty.

The Rotary Club of Estes Park has moved to its new location, meeting Thursdays at The Ridgeline Hotel in Estes Park, located at 101 South Saint Vrain Avenue. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 

Volunteers bring water safety message to Estes Park kindergarten students
 
Kindergarten students at Estes Park Elementary School had a close encounter with an otter last Friday. They learned how to keep themselves safe around water and to always be with an adult. These lifesaving lessons were delivered by our club members, friends and a rather large otter.
 
“We read to all four kindergarten classes as a follow up to last year’s program where we visited kindergarten and first grade classes,” said Chuck Bonza, project coordinator. “We were happy to see that Stephanie Hart had scheduled staff from the aquatic center to talk to the students about water safety, which helped to reinforce our Josh the Baby Otter lesson."
 
Jay and Daffney Harroff read to Stephanie Hart’s class, a special treat for Daffney, a high school student who was once one of Hart’s students. Alice Schwartz read to Edie Keller’s students, Jim Austin visited with Anne Leija’s students and Kathy Groesbeck shared the touching story with Emily Jurgens’ students.
  
 
Following the short classroom lesson on water safety, the students went to the playground, where Josh the Baby Otter mascot greeted them. Each child received a copy of the book for reading at home with parents.
            
“Many, many hugs were the order of the day on the playground,” Bonza said. “After the four kindergarten classes, the first graders came out and it all started again with the love and hugs for Josh.”
 
Josh the Baby Otter book and materials were created by the Joshua Collingsworth Memorial Foundation with a goal of educating children with a fun and simple message: “To stay away from water unless accompanied by an adult.” That message has been carried to over a million children across the U.S. Paul Foreman, a Rotarian from Colorado Springs, lost two of his grandsons in the river at Pinewood Springs two years ago. He has led the effort in Colorado to bring Josh and the reading program to hundreds of kindergartners in elementary school, and especially to Estes Park Elementary where his grandsons were students.     
Thursday's program:
Thanking our Duck Race Sponsors
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park will host a Thank You Reception for sponsors of the Rotary Duck Race Festival on Thursday, May 24, 2018 during the regular club meeting at The Ridgeline Hotel in the Trail Ridge Room. Duck Race Sponsors have been invited to attend to enjoy a complimentary lunch provided by The Ridgeline Hotel. 'Big Duck' Brad Rosenbaum will introduce each sponsor and award them their souvenir 2018 Sponsor Duck painted especially for them. Brad will also offer some special highlights of this year's successful 30th annual Rotary Duck Race Festival. Club member Harriette Woodard chairs this new event and has planned a delightful luncheon to honor our Duck Race sponsors.  We deeply appreciate their generosity and look forward to thanking them in person at the luncheon!
 
Come and celebrate our Duck Race sponsors!
Grateful students earn $42,500 in scholarships from our club
 
What a tremendous evening for our Estes Park High School students. The senior class earned over $100,000 in scholarships from many business, clubs and organizations. Our club gave $42,500 of that total, both in academic scholarships and in named memorial scholarships. The winners are:
Academic - $8,000 each, over 4 years : Hanna Bergsten, Anya Igel, Phoebe Dixon
Hagemeister Eagle Scouts -  $2,000 each: Will Peters, Amos Westley
Carver - $2,000: Braeden Johnson
Prochaska - $1,500: Marianne LaMont, Luis Guadarrama, Matthew Birchfield, Guiliana Mazza
Stanley Hotel -  $2,500: Andra McDougall
Archibald Art - $1,000: Casey Walsh
Hagemeister Education - $1,000 each: Jessa Abel, Sadie Vik
Kuhns Memorial - $1,000: Will Thomas
 
                       
2018 Rotary Club of Estes Park scholarship recipients (Photo by Marsha Hobert)
 
Ron Kuhns' sons (left) attended the ceremony to congratulate the Kuhns Memorial Scholarship recipient. (Photo by Marsha Hobert).
 
 
 
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Sue Fereday
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RYLA