Rotary Club Of Estes Park
 
Club Information

Welcome to our Club!

Estes Park

Service Above Self

We meet Thursdays at 12:00 PM
Rodeway Inn
1701 North Lake Avenue
Estes Park, CO  80517
United States
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Officers And Directors
President
President Elect
Treasurer
Secretary
Sergeant-at-Arms
Past President
Club Administration
Community Service
Fund Development
International Service
Membership
Youth/New Generation Services
Program Committee Chair
 
Home Page Stories
Who should care about childcare in EP?
Program to tell us why we all should care

Everyone depends on someone who depends on childcare.  Our Estes community thrives when our families thrive because children are our future workforce, community members, and community leaders.  However, families living in Estes Park are struggling continuously to access high quality, affordable child care, necessary for working families and critical to healthy development of our youngest citizens.

Michael Moon, Chair of the Childcare Services Committee, a subcommittee of the Estes Park Economic Development Committee, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, November 16, at their regular noon meeting. He plans to address the issue of insufficient childcare availability in the Estes Valley.

 

Moon’s career was in high tech at Harris Corporation, Storage Technology, Intel Corporation and Weyerhaeuser. He holds a BSEE and MSEE fro Georgia Tech and a MBA from the University of Oregon.

Since he moved to the area, Moon has been active in many civic activities. He was the Chair of the Lot 4 Election Committee for the Estes Park Medical Center and was a Planning Commission Chair. Additionally, he serves as an active member of the Estes Park Police Department Auxiliary, the Presbyterian Community Church, and the Broadband Committee of the Estes Park Economic Development Corporation. 

Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 35,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries. Rotarians believe that we have a shared responsibility to take action on our world’s most persistent issues. Rotary clubs work together to promote peace, fight disease, provide clean water and sanitation, support mothers and children, foster education, and grow local economies. We encourage you to get involved.

The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 

Who put the Chapin in Mt. Chapin?
Jim Pickering to share the story
 
Jim Pickering, Historian Laureate of Estes Park, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Nov. 2, at their regular noon meeting. His program is titled, “Who Put the Chapin in Mount Chapin?”
 
Frederick Hastings Chapin, a Connecticut druggist, authored Mountaineering in Colorado: The Peaks about Estes Park in 1879. He was Estes Park’s first climbing guide to the region, and the man for whom Mount Chapin was named.
 
A native New Yorker, Pickering received his B.A. from Williams College and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Northwestern University. He taught at Michigan State University where he served as Associate Chair and Graduate Chair of the Department of English and as Director of the Honors College. Subsequently, he was at the helm of the University of Houston as Dean, Provost, and President. 
 
 
Estes Park Historian Laureate Jim Pickering
 
A specialist in Early American Literature and the writings of James Fenimore Cooper (a fellow New Yorker), Pickering edited also a series of college-level textbooks. These included a short story textbook, Fiction 100, first published in 1974, and an anthology, currently in its 13th edition, that has now outlasted five decades of college students.  
 
A long time summer visitor to Estes Park and valley home owner since 1992, Jim began researching and writing about the history of Estes Park and the American West in the mid-1980's, “to give me something other than academic administration and intercollegiate athletics to think about.” To date he has written or edited over 30 books on these subjects.
 
Pickering formally retired to Estes Park in 2013,  and has served on the Boards of the Estes Park Economic Development Corporation, the Estes Valley Library Foundation and the Rocky Mountain Nature Association.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 35,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy. Rotary’s motto, “Service Above Self,”  best expresses Rotary’s ideals.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park, founded in 1926, meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
4th Thursday groups meet this week
 
The real work of a club happens at the committee level, and this week's meeting will give everyone the chance to engage in this important work. Following lunch and a brief business meeting, members will gather in groups related to their interests.
 
You can see what you indicated as your area of interest at the bottom of your Spoke every week. But, fear not! It's never too late to join in, try something new, or simply "shop" for a group.
 
Here are the club members who will lead the small group work at Thursday's meeting:
 
  • Dave Evans - International Service
  • Sue Fereday - Youth/New Generation Services
  • Karen Thompson - Fund Development
  • Karol Rinehart - Club Administration
  • Bill Solms - Sargeant-at-Arms
  • Rick Taylor - Programs
  • Scott Thompson - Membership
  • Roger Thorp - Community Service
Bring your energy, your ideas and your willingness to help the Rotary Club of Estes Park be a better club for all of its members. You can make a difference! 
District Governor Bill Emslie to visit Oct. 19 
         
Polish your Rotary pins! It's time for our District Governor's visit.
 
Bill Emslie, Governor of Rotary District 5440, will speak Thursday, Oct. 19, at the regular meeting of The Rotary Club of Estes Park  at noon. His district includes 53 Rotary clubs in Wyoming, Northwern Colorado, Eastern Idaho and Western Nebraska.
 
District 5440 Governor Bill Emslie
           
The International Rotary theme for the year is Rotary Making A Difference!  DG Bill is expected to focus on the People of Action Campaign for Rotary International. The theme is meant to highlight all the projects and activities that The Rotary Club of Estes Park accomplishes, both locally and internationally. Opportunities are plentiful for potential members, young and old, to help Rotary achieve its mission of “peace and understanding throughout the world,” and by bringing their passion to provide service.
 
“We’re delighted to share some of our projects with District Governor Bill Emslie," President Kathy Groesbeck said. The Rotary Club of Estes Park has participated in international, regional and local projects for 91 years. Its largest local fundraising is the Estes Park Rotary Duck Race, which generates over $100,000 annually for partner charities annually in May.The club also awards $24,000 in academic scholarships each year to graduating high school students, and also provides a robust yearly grant program for local non-profit organizations.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world.  There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century.  Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy. 
Group seeks to preserve Rockside,
Estes Park's 'White House'
 
The Historic Stanley Home Foundation was established as a Colorado non-profit corporation in October 2016 for the purpose of purchasing, renovating, preserving and operating Rockside, the F. O. Stanley home.
 
 
Anne Rogers, Treasurer of the Historic Stanley Home Foundation, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, October 12, at their regular noon meeting. She will discuss how the Stanley home will serve as a cultural center for local history education. 
 
Supporters of the tax-exempt Foundation will endeavor to raise the necessary funds to accomplish this mission. Securing this historic treasure for the benefit of the public will be a sorely-needed addition to Estes Park’s ability to express its rich history. The open space surrounding the home will eventually be placed under conservation easement to ensure its perpetual protection.
 
Anne Rogers spent 15 years in veterinary medical research with USDA and Pfizer Animal Health. Following that, she sold scientific and laboratory equipment in Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska for 20 years. She and her husband have owned property in Estes Park since 2000 and became permanent residents in 2013. Anne works for the Rocky Mountain Conservancy and is the President of Chapter HF, P.E.O.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
Eagle Rock, RMNP collaborate to enhance science, leadership lessons
 
Eagle Rock School and Professional Development Center and Rocky Mountain National Park embarked on a partnership in 2008 to engage students in their education by developing opportunities for students to connect with national parks and the outdoors. Both organizations desired to increase relevancy of national parks for youth diversity of employees and user base.
 
Jon Anderson, instructor at Eagle Rock School, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, October 5, at their regular noon meeting.  Anderson and Eagle Rock students plan to discuss the program.
 
Jon Anderson
 
Anderson works in the Human Performance Outdoor Education Department at Eagle Rock School and Professional Development Center in Estes Park. Jon has worked as an instructor at Eagle Rock School for the past 15 years and served as a house parent for seven years. He is responsible for running the Internship and Citizen Science program with RMNP and teaches other experiential science and leadership based classes.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend.  Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
4th Thursday groups meet this week
 
The real work of a club happens at the committee level, and this week's meeting will give everyone the chance to engage in this important work. Following lunch and a brief business meeting, members will gather in groups related to their interests.
 
You can see what you indicated as your area of interest at the bottom of your Spoke every week. But, fear not! It's never too late to join in, try something new, or simply "shop" for a group.
 
Here are the club members who will lead the small group work at Thursday's meeting:
 
Dave Evans - International Service
Sue Fereday - Youth/New Generation Services
Karen Thompson - Fund Development
Karol Rinehart - Club Administration
Bill Solms - Sargeant-at-Arms
Rick Taylor - Programs
Scott Thompson - Membership
Roger Thorp - Community Service
 
Bring your energy, your ideas and your willingness to help the Rotary Club of Estes Park be a better club for all of its members. You can make a difference! 
 
 
What's new in Estes Park?   
 
Frank Lancaster to headline Sept. 21 program 
 
Frank Lancaster, Town Administrator for the Town of Estes Park, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, September 21, at their regular noon meeting. Lancaster will provide a Town update.
 
Lancaster has worked for over 36 years in various capacities in the public sector, including City Forester, County Forester, Director of Natural Resources, and 18 years as County Manager for Larimer County. Frank has been the Estes Park Town Administrator since 2012. He is a Colorado native and holds Bachelor and Master degrees from Colorado State University.
 
Frank Lancaster
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century.  Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
Health care's shift from volume to value:
 Drs. Fonken and Bailey to discuss transition
 
Dr. Paul Fonken, Medical Director at the Timberline Medical Clinic, and Dr. Austin Bailey will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Sept. 14, at their regular noon meeting. They will provide an overview of the ongoing transition of the U.S. health care system from a fee-for-service driven system to a value-based system. 
 
This transition started well before Obama Care, and very likely, will continue regardless of national politics. The change is driven by the high cost of the fee-for-service system, which promotes increasing utilization of expensive health care services while underemphasizing prevention and care for chronic diseases. In contrast, value based health system reforms are beginning to bend the cost curve by tracking and rewarding methods of care that both improve quality and decrease costs.
 
Dr. Fonken will illustrate this shift from a “volume-based” system to a “value-based” system by describing changes at Timberline Medical over the past 10 years. As a certified “Patient-Centered Medical Home,” Timberline Medical has improved its methods of providing primary medical care. This has resulted in better health status for Timberline’s patient population, while decreasing the total cost of medical care for Timberline’s Medicare patients.
 
Dr. Paul Fonken
 
Dr. Fonken is Board Certified by the American Board of Family Medicine. He attended high school in Laramie, WY and did his pre-medical studies at the University of Wyoming. He completed medical school at the University of New Mexico in their innovative “Primary Care Curriculum”.  After completing his family medicine residency in Greeley, CO in 1990, he joined Timberline Medical, where he practiced full spectrum family medicine until 1997. He then spent eight years with a team in Kyrgyzstan helping to establish family medicine as a medical specialty in the Central Asian Republics. Since returning to Timberline Medical in 2005, he has been helping the clinic to navigate the transition toward “value-based” care.
 
Dr. Fonken continues to care for Timberline’s patients at EPMC, where he has served twice as the chief of the medical staff.  Also, he is an assistant clinical professor of the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.
 
Dr. Austin Bailey
 
Dr. Bailey is a graduate of the University of Texas and Texas Tech University. He served 28 years on the faculty of the Fort Collins Family Medicine Residency Program at Poudre Valley Hospital, serving as its Program Director for 19 of those years. Currently, Dr. Bailey provides leadership in two major areas for UCHealth. He is the Medical Director for Population Health, where he facilitates the development of UCHealth’s Clinically Integrated Network which contracts directly with employers. In addition, he is the Medical Director for Primary Care within the UCHealth Medical Group, where he facilitates the transformation of primary care practices towards a “Patient Centered Medical Home” and advises UCHealth on its Primary Care strategy.
Group raising funds for Veterans Monument
 
The Estes Park Veterans Monument Committee is on a mission to raise the funds to build a Monument on Town of Estes Park land just west of the Visitors Center.
 
Carey Stevanus has been involved in the planning for the Veterans Monument from the beginning and will present the plans for the Monument at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Sept. 7, at their regular noon meeting.
 
Stevanus has been the Activities Manager at the Good Samaritan Society - Estes Park Village for the past 12 years. During that time, she served as a Guardian on an Honor Flight Northern Colorado flight where 11 World War II veterans from Good Samaritan traveled to Washington, D.C., to see the Monument built in their honor.
 
Two years later she joined Vern Mertz, Bob Brunson and Gary Brown on a mission to raise money to cover the cost of every Estes Valley resident who wanted to go on the Honor Flight. The committee raised over $100,000, which paid for the flight cost of 100 veterans.
 
Now, the committee has set a new goal of raising the funds for the Estes Park Veterans Monument. 
 
Thorp Associates Architecture immediately offered to design the Monument pro bono. The Town of Estes Park approved the plan, and fundraising for the Monument began this spring. Among many others, the Rotary Club of Estes Park has generously donated to the project.
 
Architectural rendering of Estes Park Veterans Monument
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
Improv duo to entertain Rotarians Aug. 24
 
The Estes Park Rotary will host the quick-witted New York City actors, Mike Durkin and Laura Livingston, for a brief performance on Thursday, August 24, at their regular noon meeting.
 
Improvisational theatre, is the art of making up scenes, on the spot. “It’s the theatrical equivalent of jazz,” says Laura, who with her husband Mike, runs one of New York City’s premier improv companies, Freestyle Repertory Theatre. “Many people are most familiar with improv from watching ‘Whose Line is it Anyway?’ on TV.”
 
Mike Durkin and Laura Livingston
 
Freestyle Rep’s professional history dates back to 1982 when the company began performing to rave reviews Off-Broadway in New York City. The New York Times has called them, “kooks on the loose.” The Post has claimed, “You’d be hard pressed to see anything better on Broadway.” And offoffonline.com calls the group “civic treasures.” They have toured to Canada, England, the Netherlands, Australia and New Zealand. In addition, since 1988, they have performed and taught in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut schools, reaching 15,000 students every year.
 
Mike and Laura are known to local audiences through their presentations at the Estes Park Rotary, as well as workshops and performances for the public that the Fine Arts Guild of the Rockies sponsored in the past. Laura’s father, Harry Livingston, is a member of Rotary, and she has vacationed in Estes “every chance I get for about the last 45 years.”
 
Mike and Laura’s performance for the Rotary Club will consist of short improvised scenes based on audience suggestions. Audience members will even be invited to get up on stage and improvise with them. Laura explains, “A lot of times people who’ve never been performers – and who wouldn’t dream of going on stage – really enjoy improvising with us. Often they’re very good at it.”  As Mike says, “We specialize in creating a supportive atmosphere where everyone has a good time.”
 
What does the Conservancy do for RMNP?
 Estee Rivera Murdock to present on Aug. 17
 
The Rocky Mountain Conservancy promotes stewardship of Rocky Mountain National Park through education and philanthropy. The Rocky Mountain Conservancy (formerly the Rocky Mountain Nature Association) was established on July 8, 1931, making it one of the oldest national park cooperating organizations in the nation. Since its foundation, the organization has funded over $30 million of support for Rocky Mountain National Park and related public lands.
 
Estee Rivera Murdock, Executive Director of the Rocky Mountain Conservancy, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, August 17, at their regular noon meeting. Murdock will provide an overview of the Conservancy, review recent contributions to the Park and community, and discuss challenges and opportunities for the organization.
 
 
Estee Rivera Murdock
 
Murdock earned a B.A in Anthropology and Spanish Literature and an M.A. in Geography with a focus on Hispanic Community Engagement and Public Lands and Geographic Information Science, all from the University of Arizona. She worked for the National Park Service for nearly a decade, first at Saguaro National Park and later at the Washington, D.C., Headquarters office. Currently, she resides with her husband and daughter in Estes Park, CO.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
Skiing without sight: Thursday's program on Foresight Ski Guides
 
Mark G. Davis will present an overview of Foresight Ski Guides, an organization that he founded in 2001 to provide challenge recreation to blind and visually impaired skiers. Bill Murphy, senior guide with Foresight Ski guides, will also present.
 

Davis, founder and president of Foresight Ski Guides, lost his functional vision as a result of a rare symptom of Multiple Sclerosis in 1999. Being a skier for almost as long as he could walk, he was devastated not only by the loss of his sight, but also by the prospect of losing the freedom and thrill of skiing.


Following this sudden and tragic turn in his life, Mark decided that vision alone would not keep him from the slopes. With the assistance of Colorado Ski School for the Blind he was soon back on the mountain. For Mark, this experience with challenge recreation was the transformative experience that lifted grief and depression and brought renewed passion and confidence. Mark has dedicated his life to offering others in similar situations the thrilling, life altering adventure of ‘skiing blind.’

Thursday's program: dismantling barriers
to girls' education in rural Kenya
 
For the Good Period works to address barriers to education in rural Kenya for adolescent girls that result from extreme poverty and historical patriarchy. Good Period addresses the root causes of absenteeism and drop-out by working with communities to reconsider gender norms, provide information on sexual and reproductive health, distribute reusable sanitary pads, and raise expectations for girls.
 
Dr. Kayce Anderson, humanitarian, ecologist, mother, explorer, and eternal student, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, August 3, at their regular noon meeting. Anderson will discuss For the Good Period and its work dismantling barriers to girls’ education in rural Kenya.
 
Dr. Kayce Anderson
 
For the Good Period feels that long-term change can only come from within communities. Therefore, while facilitating discussions around important subject matters, they use methods that develop community capacity and self agency.
 
Anderson feels strongly that education is a right and the key to alleviating many of the world’s challenges. She completed a bachelor degree at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and a Ph.D. at the University of California, Davis. 
 
She applies her training as an ecologist to her work with For the Good Period, combining evidence based methods and community input to improve education outcomes for girls. Kaye loves to see people set big goals and succeed in reaching them. She is passionate about helping people help themselves. There is not much distinction between Kayce’s work and personal life. She tries to stay outside more than in, surround herself with people she respects, and not take herself too seriously.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs, around the world, initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road.  Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend.  Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
Message from the President
By Kathy Groesbeck
July 27, 2017
 
 
Club Assembly This Week
-To Be A Vibrant Club
 
Club members will have the opportunity on the 4th Thursday of July at a Club Assembly to engage in meaningful discussion about our club’s priorities to make a positive community impact. Together, we can decide what we want our club to be like in the next three-to-five years. We will determine what we need to do to attain our club’s vision of being a vibrant club. Long-range goals under consideration include the following: 
 
  • Prioritize Community Service Projects
  • Evaluate Fundraising Activities
  • Enhance Leadership Development with Succession Planning
  • Improve Membership Retention and Recruitment
  • Increase Foundation and RI Foundation Giving
By attending the Club Assembly, you will be connecting with other members to voice your ideas about our club’s Goals and Activities.  We can maximize our collective expertise to address opportunities in our community to Make A Difference. A Club Assembly can be inspiring for members and fuel our shared passion to do great things together.  And have FUN while doing it!
 
There are a lot of things our club is really GOOD at. Now we want to make those things something we are really GREAT at. Come to Club Assembly this week to roll up your sleeves, listen to others, voice your thoughts, and help us look for new ideas. Let us channel our enthusiasm into ACTION!
July 20 program digs into ROOTS
 
ROOTS, a new Estes Park nonprofit, connects our diverse citizenry to earth systems and serves as a resource for our community to become more sustainable and resilient in this rapidly changing world. Through community programs, summer programs, outreach, professional development and a one-room schoolhouse for children grades K-5, ROOTS offers opportunities for participants to gain critical skills and knowledge needed to become innovative, informed and engaged 21st century earth citizens. 
 
Programs emphasize using the natural environment as a catalyst for interdisciplinary learning outdoors, finding a connection to our community and to our mountains, understanding earth’s systems, collaborative learning across boundaries of difference, and imparting sustainability knowledge and practical living skills. ROOTS’ programs are intentionally inclusive to all learner-types with specific programs for children with special needs.
 
Maisie Greer, Founder/Director of ROOTS, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, July 20, at their regular noon meeting.  She will share further details about the ROOTS curriculum.
 
 
Maisie Greer
 
A resident of Estes Park for 20 years, Greer’s deep connection to nature guided her through her childhood, and she is passionate about connecting all youth to the non-judgmental world of nature.  After five years of teaching short-term outdoor education programs, Greer witnessed the deep impact nature-learning was having on her students and dreamed of a time when learning outdoors was the norm rather than a supplement to learning.
 
Greer holds a Masters of Science degree in Environmental Studies/Environmental Education from Antioch University New England and has over 25 years experience teaching and developing experiential education programs for a wide diversity of participants. Through the guidance of Antioch University’s Systems Educator Tom Wessels and Place-Based Education leader David Sobel, Greer was inspired to open a full-time school focused on education for sustainability using nature as the classroom and catalyst for leaning. She is dedicated to helping residents of Estes Park learn how to live more sustainably through engaging programs that involve the community from the ground up.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world.  There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century.  Rotary clubs, around the world, initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m.
What's new at Rocky?
 
Supt. Darla Sidles to present July 13 program
 
Rocky Mountain National Park, one of the most beautiful and iconic parks in the National Park Service, provides exceptional opportunities for wilderness recreation and mountain scenery. Darla Sidles, Superintendent at Rocky Mountain National Park, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park Thursday, July 13, at their regular noon meeting. She will provide an update on Rocky Mountain National Park, the third most visited national park in America.
 
 
RMNP Superintendent Darla Sidles
 
Sidles began her career as a Student Conservation Association (SCA) volunteer and worked seasonally in the North Cascades, Denali National Park, Arches National Park, Big Bend National Park, and Zion National Park. At Zion she became a permanent employee, before being promoted to assistant monument manager and then superintendent at Grand Canyon Parashant National Monument in Arizona. 
 
Subsequently, she worked at Independence National Historical Park in Philadelphia, as associate to the NPS director in Washington, DC, and as superintendent at Saguaro National Park in Tucson, Arizona. In August 2016, Sidles began her new assignment at Rocky Mountain National Park.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m.
 

Rotary helps tell the story
The editor regrets the error in the Green Apples caption in last week's edition. Thanks to "Eagle Eye" Ron Gordon for noting that the lady next to Thor was Marilyn Maher,. The caption should have read: "Present for the July 7 re-dedication of Little Green Apples sculpture with new plaque funded by our club, were several Rotary Club of Estes Park members, friends and library staff."
EPMC's Larry Leaming to present July 6 program
 
Selected in October 2016 to lead the Estes Park Medical Center, Larry Leaming, Ph.D., will be our featured speaker on Thursday, July 6. Leaming, who became EPMC Chief Executive Officer in mid-January, will talk about Estes Park Medical Center and its mission of “making a positive difference in the health and wellbeing of all we serve.”
 
Larry Leaming
 
"At Estes Park Medical Center, it takes over 300 employees, and each of their diverse talents, to fulfill the promise that is our mission. Each employee, physician and nurse who make up the EPMC family is an integral piece to the care we provide, " he said.
 
Leaming will discuss the great care, compassion of each employee, and the dedication and the strategic planning ahead for the future of Estes Park Medical Center. 
 
Larry received his Bachelor of Arts in Biology and Chemistry and Augustana College in Sioux Falls, SD.  He went on to receive his Masters of Science in Health Administration from Central Michigan University and his Doctor of Health Administration from Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina. He is Board Certified in Healthcare Management and a Fellow in the American College of Healthcare Executives. 
 
Larry has had extensive experience working with acute care providers and health networks especially in Colorado.  He has served as Chief Executive Officer at Sterling Regional Medical Center, East Morgan County Hospital and St. Vincent Hospital in Leadville. Larry came to Estes Park from Roosevelt General Hospital in Portales, New Mexico, a 24-bed general acute care hospital.

President's Night - A Changing of the Guard

Farewell, Thor, and Welcome, Kathy!
 
 
 

President Thor Homme congratulates Doug Mann, the 2016-17 Spirit Award Winner. Trudy Collar, the 2015-16 winner presented Doug's award.

Chuck Bonza received the 2016-17 Distinguished Service Award from last year's winner, Rita DuChateau.

A new honor, the Living Legacy Award, went to Wayne Newsom. Longtime friend Bill Smith presented. 

Three Rotarians in one family in our club! We're so glad you are members and also glad Pat is a frequent guest!

And, drum roll, please: The Rotarian of the Year - Gregg Jurgens. He accepted the award from last year's recipient, Longley Parker. Gregg's wife, Suzanne, now has to figure our where to display the award!

This newsletter editor/public relations volunteer was indeed surprised. Her husband now has to keep the beautiful vase filled with flowers.

Thor thanked his 2016-17 board of directors.

Kathy Groesbeck, president elect for just a few more moments, presents Thor with a Paul Harris award.

More bling for Thor: a gavel plaque honoring his presidency and a Rotary badge that reads, "Former President".

And now, Kathy's year begins! Best of luck to you, Madame President.

Assistant District 5440 Governor Ron Randle and Thor reflected on a successful year.

Pete Sumey, outgoing Foundation Board President thanked his board for their service. 

June 15 program features Dr. Michael Grant Sharing his medical mission to Nicaragua 
 
Michael Grant, MD, will return to the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, June 15, to present a program on a recent trip to Nicaragua. Partially funded with a grant from our club, Dr. Grant's work in Nicaragua is through the non-profit St. James Orthopaedic Mission. Participants provide medical services to the poor.
 
Dr. Michael Grant
 
Dr. Grant received his medical degree from Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington, DC and went on to complete his residency at Fitzsimmons Army Medical Center. Additionally, he spent 9 years in a variety of roles for the United States Army; one year of internship, two years as a flight surgeon, and two years as an orthopedic surgeon. Dr. Grant is board certified by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgeons. 
 
Dr. Grant’s passion is to provide care for the less fortunate. He became involved with the St. James Orthopaedic Mission, a medical mission group comprised of various medical professionals and other volunteers who typically embark on one medical mission trip per year. The group has been participating in these trips for 10 years. Each volunteer pays his or her own way; air fare, etc. As a non-profit, their only source of income is through fundraisers and donations. St. James Orthopaedic Mission received a $1,500 grant from the Rotary Club of Estes Park.
Reach for the stars with Mike Connolly
 
The Estes Park Memorial Observatory is a community resource dedicated to fostering the scientific education of children in Estes Park and to serving as an educational venue for the community and visitors. The observatory holds events throughout the year in conjunction with the local school system, the Estes Valley Astronomical Society, and public outreach.
 
Mike Connolly, Director of the Estes Park Memorial Observatory, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, June 8, at the regular noon meeting. He will review the history of the observatory from its inception, discuss Rotary’s involvement in building the Human Sundial, and share how the observatory interacts with our community.
 
Mike Connolly
 
A retired aerospace engineer, Connolly worked most of his career at Lockheed Martin as a spacecraft engineer, specializing in thermal control. In addition, he is an avid amateur astronomer, fascinated by the stars all his life,
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world.  There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road.  Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend.  Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m,, the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
No plan? Come to our program on advance directives 
 
“What’s Your Plan?” How can you have a say in your end-of-life care? Who would make your medical decisions if you were unable to speak for yourself? On Thursday, June 1, you can learn how to put a plan in writing and to effectively communicate your plan with your loved ones and the medical community. Our speaker will be Mindy Rickard, Larimer County Advance Care Plan Team Lead. The Larimer Advance Care Planning Team can guide individuals 18 years and older at no cost to complete their advance directives. 
 
Mindy Rickard

While overseeing the team, Mindy Rickard also serves as a guide to engage individuals and families in having a say in their end-of-life care and oversees outreach to engage the community in advance care planning.

Born in New Berlin, New York, Mindy was raised on a dairy farm outside of West Winfield New York. She came to Colorado and earned her Bachelor’s degree in Gerontology form the University of Northern Colorado. Prior to joining the Larimer Advance Care Planning Team, Mindy was the Executive Director of The Bridge Assisted Living for more than 18 years.Before joining The Bridge Assisted Living, Mindy was the Lead Ombudsman for Weld County.

Mindy shares her country home with her husband Steve, two Morgan horses, five incredibly spoiled barn cats and her little dog, Thor. In her spare time, Mindy enjoys riding her horses, reading, cooking and walking.

May 25 presenter Diane Knight
 Shines "A Light in the Darkness"
 
Diane Knight, a fellow Rotarian, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, May 25, at the regular noon meeting. Knight’s talk is called “A Light in the Darkness.”
 
A chance encounter at a Rotary Meeting led Diane to a life changing trip to climb Mt. Kilimanjaro and sparked her passion for our Rotary Foundation. Diane is a third-generation Rotarian who joined Rotary in Addison, Texas in 1990. She has been a member of Rotary clubs in Naperville, IL, Golden and Fort Collins Breakfast. She has served as President of both the Golden and Fort Collins clubs. In addition, she served as District Governor in 2004-2005. She is a Major Donor to the Rotary Foundation and member of the Paul Harris Society and Rotary International Foundation Bequest Society.
 
Diane Knight
 
Knight also led a GSE Team to Sao Paulo, Brazil in 1998. Additionally, she has a passion for RYLA and has been active in three International RYLA conferences. In August 2002, she chaired the first “Young RYLA” program for middle school students. She loves to train and has trained Presidents at Presidents Elect Training (PETS), incoming Governors Elect and Nominees at Zone Institutes, and Governors Elect from around the world at the International Assembly in San Diego in 2010 and 2011.
 
For her dedication to Rotary, Knight was honored with Rotary International’s Service Above Self Award in 2002.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road.  Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend.  Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
May 18 program digs into ROOTS
 
ROOTS, a new Estes Park nonprofit, connects our diverse citizenry to earth systems and serves as a resource for our community to become more sustainable and resilient in this rapidly changing world. Through community programs, summer programs, outreach, professional development and a one-room schoolhouse for children grades K-5, ROOTS offers opportunities for participants to gain critical skills and knowledge needed to become innovative, informed and engaged 21st century earth citizens. 
 
Programs emphasize using the natural environment as a catalyst for interdisciplinary learning outdoors, finding a connection to our community and to our mountains, understanding earth’s systems, collaborative learning across boundaries of difference, and imparting sustainability knowledge and practical living skills. ROOTS’ programs are intentionally inclusive to all learner-types with specific programs for children with special needs.
 
Maisie Greer, Founder/Director of ROOTS, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, May 18, at their regular noon meeting.  She will share further details about the ROOTS curriculum.
 
 
Maisie Greer
 
A resident of Estes Park for 20 years, Greer’s deep connection to nature guided her through her childhood, and she is passionate about connecting all youth to the non-judgmental world of nature.  After five years of teaching short-term outdoor education programs, Greer witnessed the deep impact nature-learning was having on her students and dreamed of a time when learning outdoors was the norm rather than a supplement to learning.
 
Greer holds a Masters of Science degree in Environmental Studies/Environmental Education from Antioch University New England and has over 25 years experience teaching and developing experiential education programs for a wide diversity of participants. Through the guidance of Antioch University’s Systems Educator Tom Wessels and Place-Based Education leader David Sobel, Greer was inspired to open a full-time school focused on education for sustainability using nature as the classroom and catalyst for leaning. She is dedicated to helping residents of Estes Park learn how to live more sustainably through engaging programs that involve the community from the ground up.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world.  There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas.  Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century.  Rotary clubs, around the world, initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road.  Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend.  Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
 
Who put the Chapin in Mt. Chapin?
Jim Pickering to share the story
 
 
Jim Pickering, Historian Laureate of Estes Park since 2006, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, May 11, at their regular noon meeting. Pickering will discuss Frederick Hastings Chapin, the first climbing guide to the Estes Park region.
 
Chapin, a Connecticut druggist, was the author of “Mountaineering in Colorado: The Peaks About Estes Park” (Boston 1879) and was the man for whom Mount Chapin is named. 
 
Pickering received his undergraduate education at Williams College and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Northwestern University. A professor of English, specializing in American literature and American studies, he taught at Michigan State University, where he served as Director of The Honors College, and at the University of Houston, where he served as dean, provost, and president.
 
Estes Park Historian Laureate Jim Pickering
 
Pickering first came to the Estes Valley with his family in the late 1940's and has been a part-time resident in Estes Park since 1992. He served on the Board of Directors of the Estes Park Museum Friends & Foundation for nine years. He has published numerous books, articles, and reviews on the history and literature of Estes Park, Colorado, and the West.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 35,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century.  Rotary clubs, around the world, initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy. Rotary’s motto, “Service Above Self,”  best expresses Rotary’s ideals.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park, founded in 1926, meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
May 4 program: Dr. Aaron Florence on Bone Carpentry

Our program this week will feature Dr. Aaron Florence of the Estes Park Medical Center. He will discuss orthopedic surgery.
 
Dr. Aaron Florence
 
Yes, orthopedic surgeons are lot like carpenters. Orthopedic surgery can include, nails, pins, screws, hammers, and drills. These type of surgeons approach the repair or replacements with a “carpenter type” mind; wanting to reconstruct the bone so it looks as close the original bone as possible. Orthopedic surgeons are trained in both surgical and non-surgical treatments for muscle, joint and bone problems whether from injury or not.

Dr. Florence is a native of Idaho.  He received his Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from Idaho State University and went on to obtain his Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine from A.T. Still University, Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine in Kirksville, Missouri. He completed his Orthopaedic residency at the New York Institute of Technology-New York College of Osteopathic Medicine at Peninsula Hospital Center and North Shore LIJ Health System. He completed his sub-specialty fellowship training in Sports Medicine at the Barton Lake Tahoe Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Fellowship in Zephyr Cover, Nevada. Here he focused on the treatment of sports related injuries of the US Ski and Snowboard Teams, collegiate, high school, and recreational athletes with a minor focus on total joint reconstruction in the aging athlete.
 
Dr. Florence performs surgery on various joints, including the hips, knees, and shoulders, and performs general orthopaedic procedures including arthroscopy, total joint replacements, and fracture care. With his training in sports medicine, he performs many specialized surgeries in both the younger and older athletes including hip arthroscopy, rotator cuff repair, and ACL reconstruction. 
 
4th Thursday groups meet this week
 
The real work of a club happens at the committee level, and this week's meeting will give everyone the chance to engage in this important work. Following lunch and a brief business meeting, members will gather in groups related to their interests.
 
You can see what you indicated as your area of interest at the bottom of your Spoke every week. But, fear not! It's never too late to join in, try something new, or simply "shop" for a group.
 
Here are the club members who will lead the small group work at Thursday's meeting:
 
Dave Evans - International Service
Dmitri Galcovski - Youth/New Generation Services
Karen Thompson - Fund Development
Karol Rinehart - Club Administration
Randy Skeie - Sargeant-at-Arms
Rick Taylor - Programs
Scott Thompson - Membership
Roger Thorp - Community Service
 
Bring your energy, your ideas and your willingness to help the Rotary Club of Estes Park be a better club for all of its members. You can make a difference! 
 
April 20 program: Common Cents Count for Colorado
 
Since January 2010, the Estes Valley Library has provided events, classes and personal assistance to help people understand personal finance under the banner Common Cents Counts. Common Cents Counts provides the information and resources that we need to make sound financial decisions.  
 
Seven years of programs have been funded at the Estes Valley Library through three prestigious grants from the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority Foundation (FINRA) and the American Association of Libraries (ALA) through their program Smart Investing@Your Library. The first and second grants from 2010 through 2015 provided funding for the development and presentation of classes that teach basic information:  What everyone should know about managing his or her own financial life.
 
Kurtis Kelly and Marsha Yelick
 
As the second grant came to an end, the library was asked to apply for a third grant to take the successful program to other libraries throughout Colorado. For the past two years, 15 libraries across Colorado have utilized the teaching materials developed for Common Cents.
 
Kurtis Kelly, project principal for Common Cents, and Marsha Yelick, curriculum consultant, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, April 20, at their regular noon meeting. Kelly and Yelick are currently spreading Common Cents resources to as many other libraries as possible, receiving inquiries from across the country and developing a website (to be hosted by the Colorado State Library) where teaching materials will be available to all libraries and interested individuals.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs, around the world, initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
Our Foundation awards $11,450 in grants to 13 groups
 
Programs supporting arts, youth, human needs and other volunteer-fueled projects recently earned a financial boost from the Rotary Club of Estes Park Foundation. Thirteen local organizations received grants totaling $11,450 Thursday, April 6 at the Noon Rotary Club meeting.
 
“Our Foundation's Community Grants program involves a year-round effort by many in our club. Fundraisers include the Rotary Foundation Duck Race adoptions, the famous “Duck Squat” at the Duck Race, weekly ‘Happy Money’ donations made by members to celebrate and share good news,” said Grants Committee Chairman Phil Moenning.
 
 
2016-17 Estes Park Rotary Club Foundation grant recipients with Phil Moenning and Thor Homme at the April 6 meeting.
 
The grant program supports programs and projects that foster the general well being of the community while advancing the principles of Rotary. The motto of Rotary is “Service Above Self."
 
The groups receiving 2016-17 grants and the projects to which the funds will be applied are:
  • The Art Center of Estes Park - youth education program
  • The Boys & Girls Clubs of Larimer County - 2017 Summer Program
  • The Crossroads Ministry of Estes Park, Inc. - medical assistance
  • The Estes Park High School Choirs – folders to organize sheet music
  • Estes Park Learning Place, Inc. - scholarships for tutoring
  • The Estes Park Nonprofit Resource Center, Inc - continue and expand their free workshop program
  • Estes Valley Community Garden, Inc.  – garden pathway
  • Estes Valley Investment in Childhood Success - the Childcare Scholarship Fund
  • The Estes Valley Public Library Friends and Foundation, Inc. – digitization of newspapers
  • The Healing Waters Foundation, Inc. - pool passes for new members
  • Partners Mentoring Youth – training and recruitment of adult mentors
  • Estes Park Salud Foundation, Inc. – support for dental voucher program           
  • VIA Mobility Services - para-transit services in Estes Park for older adults and people with disabilities.
“It's a privilege to be able to provide support for the work of these 13 organizations, and it's a real pleasure to meet them and see what they do,” Moenning said.
 
Since 2004, the Foundation has provided over $200,000 in grants to organizations in the Estes Valley.
This week's program: working together to make a difference
 
This week's program will explain the connections between our Rotary Club of Estes Park Foundation, the District 5440 Foundation and Rotary International. Like three separate Rotary wheels, the cogs mesh to deliver help locally, regionally and globally. Our presenter will be Pete Sumey, a past president of the Rotary Club of Estes Park, and current president of the club Foundation.
 

The Rotary International Foundation is second only in size to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and partners with the Gates Foundation with a focus on Disease Prevention and Treatment  to eradicate polio. The RI Foundation provides additional emphasis through grants awarded in the areas of:
  • Maternal and Child Health,
  • Water and Sanitation,
  • Economic and Community Development,
  • Peace and Conflict Resolution, and
  • Education and Literacy.
Our District 5440 Foundation and the Rotary Club of Estes Park Foundation partner with the RI Foundation by providing grants and scholarship programs on the local and district level. This program will examine some of the grants that the Rotary Club of Estes Park has participated in to show how the Rotary Foundations work together to help our community, our region and our world.
 
Pete representing the club at Philanthropy Day
Cowboy Brad Fitch and the TropiCowboy Band to headline Saturday's Salute to Americana

“I intend for my songs to express the wonder of being alive on this beautiful planet, and I hope they will help listeners to feel relaxed, comfortable and happy," said Brad Fitch, our featured Saturday performer at Salute to Americana. "If my music takes you to a pleasant place in your heart or your mind, then I have accomplished my purpose.”

Raised in Estes Park, Colorado, singer, songwriter and guitarist Brad Fitch has been playing professionally since he was 15 years old. “Cowboy” Brad specializes in original folk and western music.
 
Cowboy Brad Fitch and the TropiCowboy Band
 
Fitch performed for the President of the United States during his 2001 visit to Colorado and during the 2008 Democratic National Convention. He has opened for an impressive array of folk and western artists. Fitch has recorded 19 albums featuring his original music that reflects what he loves about nature and the western lifestyle. He has been part of several other popular performing and recording acts including the Fitch and Chips, The Elktones, The TropiCowboy Band and Barleens’ Arizona and Rocky Mountain Oprys.
 
For more than 10 years, Fitch has performed John Denver tribute concerts fundraisers for a variety of non-profit organizations throughout the United States. He has performed at the annual John Denver memorial concerts in Aspen, Colorado several times.

Fitch is a veteran United States Coast Guard officer, a YMCA Senior Director and a National Park Service Wilderness Ranger.
 
See poster below for ticket information.
 
We're off! Duck Race sales underway
 
Representatives of the charities have collected their adoption forms, posters are going up, and buttons are appearing everywhere, so it’s time to sell, sell, sell. The 2017 Estes Park Rotary Duck Race sales campaign has officially begun.
 
The 29th Annual Estes Park Rotary Duck Race on Saturday, May 6 will include music, family activities, food, a 5K and fun run, and the all-important drop of thousands of yellow plastic ducks that race down the Fall River.
 
The process is simple: adopt a duck online for $21 at epduckrace.org or https://www.facebook.com/EPDuckRace or for $20 from a representative of any of the 68 charities and groups that are asking for support. Charities will receive $19 of every adoption form they sell in the largest fundraiser in the Estes Valley.
 
“We had a great turnout at Distribution Night, and our charities have launched sales for the 2017 Estes Park Rotary Duck Race,” Gregg ‘Big Duck’ Jurgens said. “It’s always a great event because the energy of the organizations propels our ducks to the finish line.”
 
As part of the March 2 kick-off for charities, Mayor Todd Jirsa bought the first adoption form of the 2017 race. Within minutes, online sales launched.
 
Beneficiaries may turn in batches of sold adoption forms and cash on Thursdays, March 30, April 6, April 13, April 20 and April 27 between noon and 5 p.m. Duck Central’s 2017 location is 541 Big Thompson Ave. Unit C, next to Village Pizza in Lower Stanley Village in Estes Park.
 
Duck Race questions? Call Duck Central at 970-480-5002 or email DuckRace@RotaryClubofEstesPark.org
 
Nehemiah Gateway founder to speak March 9 
 
Nehemiah Gateway was founded to help and empower people to sustainably shape and determine their lives in dignity and independence.
 
Arnold Geiger, founder and managing director of Nehemiah Gateway, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, March 9, at their regular noon meeting. Nehemiah Gateway is an international aid organization motivated to positively and sustainably improve the situation and living conditions of people in need.
 
Arnold Geiger, Nehemiah Gateway
 
Following several relief-goods transports and humanitarian missions to various countries including Sudan, Eritrea, Malawi, Ethiopia, Russia, Rumania, Turkey and Iran, Geiger with his wife and 5 children moved to Albania in 1991 to actively and sustainably invest in the long-term development of that society. While there, a multitude of projects and services came into being: emergency aid, spiritual support, medical and social aid, and educational institutions from kindergarten to university.
 
Geiger was awarded the German Federal Cross of Merit (Bundesverdienstkreuz) for his multifaceted commitment in 2008. On the occasion of the 25th anniversary of Nehemiah Gateway in Albania, he received the “Mother Teresa” award, honoring his outstanding achievements for the country of Albania. 
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
Dick Life presents this week's program: understanding Russian leaders
 
While living in and traveling about the USSR collecting intelligence, Richard Life interacted with a broad spectrum of Soviet citizens, ranging from senior Communist Party officials and military officers to shopkeepers and laborers.  As Russia has a crucial role to play in the relationship that the United States has with respect to Ukraine, Syria, Iran, North Korea, Afghanistan, and other potential global hot spots, it behooves us to become familiar with Russian President Putin and other Russian leaders.
 

Dick Life, US Navy, with 12-year old Rick Life at the 1975 Moscow May Day Parade.  
 
Richard "Dick" Life, Captain, US Navy (Ret), an intelligence collector and analyst, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, March 2, at their regular noon meeting. Dick Life has lived and worked in the international arena continuously since 1962, and is uniquely qualified to address national security issues and regional hot spots. 
 
His presentation addresses unprecedented political, economic, and social developments in Russia since 1992. In addition, he explores President Putin’s and former President Medvedev's alarming decisions in the context of the czarist and communist eras. 
 
Life completed his studies at the US Naval Academy in 1962, earned an M.A. in Russian Area Studies from Georgetown University and then graduated from the US Army War College as a senior officer.
    
A diesel submariner, who became an intelligence officer, Life was trained by the Defense Intelligence Agency and the CIA. He was involved in some 50 countries, including three tours of duty in Vietnam where he conducted covert submarine operations, served with Marines, and spend time in Saigon as Chief of Navy Intelligence Collection. 
 
In 1974-76 he was an Assistant Naval Attache in the US Embassy in Moscow, and in the late 1980's Life led Navy and Marine Corps intelligence operations from offices in Munich, Berlin and the Persian Gulf during the fall of the Berlin Wall, meltdown of the USSR, and Desert Shield/Storm.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 35,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs, around the world, initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.  Rotary’s motto, “Service Above Self,”  best expresses Rotary’s ideals.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
 
 
Happy 112th Birthday, Rotary!
 
 

On February 23, 1905, Paul P. Harris, Gustavus Loehr, Silvester Schiele, and Hiram E. Shorey gathered in Loehr’s Chicago office for what would become known as the first Rotary club meeting. Harris' desire for camaraderie among business associates brought together these four men and eventually led to an international organization of service and fellowship.

Rotary’s name came from the group’s early practice of rotating meetings among the offices of each member.
 
By July 1925, Rotary had grown to more than 2,000 clubs and an estimated 108,000 members on six continents. Rotary’s reputation attracted presidents, prime ministers, and a host of other luminaries to its ranks. As Rotary grew, members pooled their resources and used their talents to serve their communities. The organization's dedication to this ideal is best expressed in its motto, "Service Above Self."
 

Rotary now has 1.2 million members across the globe in more than 35,000 clubs.

Our club, The Rotary Club of Estes Park, was founded in 1926.

 

 
The first four Rotarians, from left: Gustavus Loehr, Silvester Schiele, Hiram Shorey and Paul P. Harris. Circa 1905-12.
 
Join the worker bees: 4th Thursday groups meet this week
 
Our club is so much more than a weekly meeting and lunch with friends! The real work of a club happens at the committee level, and this week's meeting will give everyone the chance to engage in this important work.
 
Following lunch and a brief business meeting, members will be asked to gather in groups related to their interests. Do you like to guide fundraising? Then join the Fund Development Committee meeting. Is your passion mentoring and encouraging the youth of today to become the leaders of tomorrow? Then, join the Youth/New Generations table. Maybe you have signed up to do so much, like so many club members, that you'll have to bounce between tables.
 
You can see what you indicated as your area of interest at the bottom of your Spoke every week. But, fear not! It's never too late to join in, try something new, or simply "shop" for a group.
 
Here are the club members who will lead the small group work at Thursday's meeting:
 
Dave Evans - International Service
Dmitri Galcovski - Youth/New Generation Services
Karen Thompson - Fund Development
Karol Rinehart - Club Administration
Randy Skeie - Sargeant-at-Arms
Rick Taylor - Programs
Scott Thompson - Membership
Roger Thorp - Community Service
 
Bring your energy, your ideas and your willingness to help the Rotary Club of Estes Park be a better club for all its members.
 
The Fourth Thursday committee meetings are also scheduled for March 23, April 27 and May 25. You can make a difference! 
 
 
Roger Thorp led the Community Service Committee at the January Fourth Thursday session.
 
 
Rotary Quote of the Week
 

“No one can see the future. No one knows what changes lie ahead. But I have faith in Rotary, and in Rotarians, that with every passing year, you will make our world a better place through Rotary Serving Humanity." 

         ~John F. Germ, 2016-17 President, Rotary International, on the 112th  anniversary of the founding of Rotary on February 23, 1905.

Estes Park Environmental Center Executive Director Melinda Merrill to speak on Feb. 16
 
Melinda Merrill, Executive Director of the Estes Park Environmental Center, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Feb. 16, at their regular noon meeting. EPMC is a nonprofit organization devoted to impacting conservation efforts by facilitating collaboration opportunities and citizen science outreach.
 
Merrill will review the regional and international conferences that Estes Park Environmental Center has sponsored, in partnership with conservation groups, Rocky Mountain National Park, and the National Park Service. In addition, she will explain the Center’s educational monitoring programs, which include school districts, pre-service teachers, and national travel groups.  She will emphasize the stewardship work in which we can all participate. Merrill developed a citizen science program that uses environmental monitoring to help agencies manage and gain insight into difficult environmental issues. 
 
Melinda Merrill
 
The Man and the Biosphere Program of United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has become a programming emphasis, with UNESCO acknowledging their work in assisting with collaborations and information communications on this program. In particular, Merrill will explain the Know Your Biosphere Lecture Series and the the associated video being developed.
 
Furthermore, she will highlight two art shows, one for the Rocky Mountain National Park centennial and the other for the National Park Service Centennial. 
 
Merrill earned a Master of Science in Teaching and Leadership with an emphasis in Gifted Education from the University of Kansas with undergraduate degrees from St. Mary’s University and Colorado State University. She taught science to gifted and highly gifted students from Grades 6 - 10, as well as high school environmental science.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world.  There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas.  Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century.  Rotary clubs, around the world, initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road.  Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend.  Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
Logs for today, trees for tomorrow
Jim White to present Feb. 9 program 
 
Jim White, who worked in the lumber industry, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Feb. 9, at their regular noon meeting. He will discuss sustainable logging practices as practiced in the redwood lumber industry 1949-1956.
 
Club member Jim White
 
After serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II, White graduated from the University of Michigan in 1950 with a degree in wood technology.  He founded a wholesale lumber distribution business, Jim White Lumber Sales, in 1950.  After retiring in 1982, Jim and his wife Joanne moved to their vacation home in Estes Park in 1985. They have three daughters, six grandchildren, and two great grandchildren, all living within one hour of Estes Park. Jim served as a director and officer of the Estes Valley Land Trust (EVLT) for 25 years, retiring from EVLT in 2015.
 
 
Feb. 2 program to feature Realities for Children president
 
Craig Secher
 
The mission of Realities for Children Charities is to create a world-class model of collaboration in Larimer County by building a Realities for Children Homebase Facility and Youth Activities Campus. This facility will unite the 31 non-profit affiliate agencies and better the healing path to recovery for children that have been abused, neglected or are at-risk.
 
Realities for Children Charities has been recognized in human services, business and government sectors, including being twice recognized as the Charity of Choice in Colorado, receiving the E-chievement Award by National Public Radio and a Congressional Leadership Award.
 
Craig Secher, President of Realities for Children Charities, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, February 2, at their regular noon meeting.  Secher’s program will review this unique organizational model which has built a private-social partnership between the non-profit and for-profit communities that is dedicated to seeing that no child in need is forgotten.
 
Secher graduated from the University of Wisconsin Stevens Point with a degree in psychology with an emphasis on human services.  He worked in the child protection field in Larimer County, including work as a Child Protection Ongoing Case Manager with the Larimer County Department of Human Services before founding Realities for Children.  For 27 years, Secher has been serving the needs of children that have been abused, neglected or are at-risk in Larimer County. In his role as President of the charity, he is responsible for Affiliate Youth Agency partnerships and emergency fund allocations.
 
Among numerous accolades, Secher has been featured as a TedX presenter and has been awarded the My Day I Survived award from Child Protection Services, the Distinguished Community Partner Award form Lutheran Family Services, and the Outstanding Young Coloradan by the Colorado Junior Chamber of Commerce. 
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world.  There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34, just west of Dry Gulch Road. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
Fourth Thursday Committee Work 
 
This week we will continue the forth Thursday committee meetings. It's an opportunity for you to get involved or continue what your'e currently doing in our club while maximizing your time. Get two birds with one stone while attending a meeting and contributing to a committee. After all, when we're all engaged it makes for a better club and place to serve. We look forward to seeing you all there!
 
Here are the club members who will lead the small group work at Thursday's meeting:
 
Dave Evans - International Service
Dmitri Galcovski - Youth/New Generation Services
Kathy Groesbeck - Fund Development
Karol Rinehart - Club Administration
Randy Skeie - Sargeant-at-Arms
Rick Taylor - Programs
Scott Thompson - Membership
Roger Thorp - Community Service
 
Bring your energy, your ideas and your willingness to help the Rotary Club of Estes Park be a better club for all its members.
 
The fourth Thursday committee meetings are also scheduled for February 23, March 23, April 27 and May 25. You can make a difference! 
 
Fund Development Committee at our last Club Assembly
 
YMCA Director DeLuca to present Jan. 19 program
 
Dave DeLuca, Center Director and Managing Director of the Estes Park Center of the YMCA, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Jan. 19, at their regular noon meeting. He will share information about the history to the YMCA of the Rockies and its current operations, speak about the YMCA’s many connections to the local community, and discuss the challenges faced by the Estes Park Center.
 
The DeLuca Family
 
The Estes Park Center is the largest YMCA conference and family center in the world.  The Estes Park Center and Snow Mountain Ranch (located near Granby, Colorado) are the two operating units of the YMCA of the Rockies. Combined, the two centers serve more than 220,000 guests per year.
 
De Luca  has spend more than thirty years working for the YMCA, mostly in the resident camping field. He has served as the director of Camp Abenaki (Burlington, Vermont), Camp Becket (western Massachusetts), and as the CEO of YMCA Camp Mason (New Jersey). He took his current position at the Estes Park Center on October 2014.
 
Dave and his wife Laurie live here in Estes Park and have enjoyed the transition to Colorado. Their two daughters visit regularly.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs, around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
Jan. 12 Program: focus on Estes Park fire services 
 

David Wolf, Fire Chief for the Estes Valley Fire Protection District, will present our program on Thursday, Jan. 12. As chief, Wolf is responsible for guiding the district toward its mission of providivg the citizens and visitors to the Estes Valley with superior fire prevention, fire protection, and emergency services in a safe and efficient manner.

"We accomplish this with a combination department that includes five full-time staff and 43 volunteers. Our primary response district has grown well beyond the boundary of the Town of Estes Park, and encompassing 66 sq. miles," Wolf explains. "The District also provides mutual aid to neighboring departments in Allenspark, Pinewood Springs, Big Thompson, and Glen Haven, as well as Rocky Mountain National Park. First as the Estes Park Fire Department (1907-2010) and now as the Fire District, the organization’s success is the result of countless dedicated volunteers committed to serving their community."

Wolf's presentation will serve two roles. First, he will give some background and updates on the Fire District’s state and short term future plans. Second, he will discuss the role that citizens play in fire prevention to reduce both their risk and the risk of the community.

"Fire prevention is a key part of our mission, and the most effective way to reduce the risk of incidents and minimize the impact of incidents that do happen," Wolf said. "We will review a few key tips for ensuring your own home is protected, including: understanding fire restrictions, home smoke detectors, carbon monoxide detectors, and wildfire defensible space.


David Wolf, EVFPD Chief

Before assuming his role with the EVFPD in June 2016, Wolf spent 15 years as a volunteer firefighter in Pennsylvania, New York, and Texas. He earned a B.S. in from Allegheny College, a M.S. from Washington State University, and a Ph.D. from Cornell University, all in geology. He worked for an international oil & gas company in Houston for six years as a research scientist and exploration geologist. While a full time graduate student, David also worked as a State Fire Instructor in New York. Once in Houston, he served the 600 member Cy-Fair Fire Department as a station officer, board member, and ultimately managed the department’s fire training program for 350 volunteers.

Please join the Rotary Club of Estes Park in welcoming David Wolf on Jan. 12.

 
 Jan. 5 Meeting Cancelled due to Weather Conditions
 
What’s Your Plan? Advance directives and why they're important
 
This week's program will feature Mindy Rickard, Larimer Advance Care Plan Team Lead. She will discuss “What’s Your Plan? How can you have a say in your end-of-life care?"  Her presentation will cover such questions as: Who would make your medical decisions if you were unable to speak for yourself? 
 
Mindy Rickard
 
"Learn how to put a plan in writing and to effectively communicate your plan with your loved ones and the medical community," Rickard said. 
 
The Larimer Advance Care Planning Team can guide individuals 18 years and older at no cost in the process of completing their advance directives.
 
Dec. 15 program: The distance between getting by and going under
 
Crossroads Ministry of Estes Park has served the Estes community since 1982, following the Lawn Lake flood. Crossroads began as a food pantry, established by the St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church, and was eventually sponsored by the Estes Valley Interfaith Council. In addition to food assistance, Crossroads provides additional emergency services in rent/housing, utility assistance, help with medical expenses, transportation and other basic human needs.
 
In addition to addressing an immediate crisis, case managers encourage clients to remain self-sufficient and assist in setting goals, money management and finding resources for employment. Also, Crossroads has been instrumental in supporting residents with recovery from the 2013 flood.
 
The Reverend Doctor Tim McLemore, Executive Director of Crossroads Ministry of Estes Park, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park Thursday, Dec. 15, at their regular noon meeting. He will provide information about the ways Crossroads helps persons in need in our community and ways for others to help make a difference.
 
Dr. Tim McLemore
 
Dr. McLemore earned a B.A. in Bible summa cum laude from Mt. Vernon Bible College in Ohio, the Master of Divinity at Perkins School of Theology, and the Doctor of Ministry degree at Iliff School of Theology in Denver.  McLemore has been an ordained United Methodist clergyperson for 30 years, serving as pastor of local congregations in North Texas for 25 years and at Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University in Dallas for 5 years. In May 2015, McLemore accepted an invitation to serve as Executive Director of Crossroads Ministry of Estes Park.
 
Tim’s first career was as a professional musician, including four years with the U.S. Air Force field bands in Shreveport, LA, and in the Panama Canal Zone.  His primary musical instruments include piano, guitar electric bass, and clarinet, and he is currently playing bass with local band, Elk Hollow. Tim’s wife, Nancy McLemore, is Association Executive for the Estes Park Board of Realtors.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
Harmony CEO Dorman will be Dec. 8 speaker
 
Harmony Foundation is one of the longest running and most respected residential drug and alcohol treatment centers in the country. Addressing the pressing health and social concerns of addiction in a serene mountain setting is Harmony’s mission.
 
Despite its longevity and excellent reputation, many Estes Park residents are not aware of Harmony Foundation and what they do. For many years that was intentional in order to protect the confidentiality of their clients. While Harmony still values and supports confidentiality, they recognize the need to come out of the shadows and talk about alcoholism and drug addiction openly and publicly. 
 
Dorothy “Dot” Dorman, Chief Executive Officer of the Harmony Foundation, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Dec. 8, at their regular noon meeting. She will review the impact of addiction on society and the very painful and personal impact on individuals and their families. In particular, she will focus on the help and hope offered by Harmony and other treatment centers.
 
Dorothy Dorman, Harmony Foundation Chief Executive Officer
 
Combining her business, computer and personal relations skills, Ms. Dorman led the Accounting, Human Resources and Computer Technology Departments of Harmony for over 20 years. She served as Chief Financial Officer prior to being promoted to Chief Executive Officer in 2009. All of the positions that Dorman has held at Harmony Foundation have enabled her to fulfill her passion to help families dealing with addiction issues. In the time that she has been with Harmony, she estimates that more than 20,000 individuals have sought treatment there. 
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs, around the world, initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
 
Welcome to December! Mountain Echoes Choir to entertain this week
 
 
It is the season to carol, to sing our holiday songs.
 
To help us get into the holiday mood, Mountain Echoes, a student choir, will sing at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, December 1, at their regular noon meeting. Mountain Echoes is an after-school choir for students in Grades 3-5 at the Estes Park Elementary School. Mountain Echoes is directed by Mrs. Jenna Williams and accompanied by Mr. Mike Williams. 
 
Mountain Echoes sang holiday songs for the Estes Park Tree Lighting Ceremony this year. They have sung the national anthem for the boys’ varsity basketball game and were chosen to sing the national anthem at a Rockies baseball game last year. In addition, they will be singing at the elementary school Christmas Sing-Along in December. 
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park. Please note that parents and friends of the students are more than welcome to attend and enjoy the performance. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
This week's program: Wellness Center update
 
The Estes Park Medical Center (EPMC) plans to build a destination Wellness Center on Lot 4 on The Stanley campus here in Estes Park.  This project will require raising $8 million through a capital campaign to fund construction and startup costs. The Wellness Center is designed to be an economic driver for Estes Park tourism as well as an additional service line for the Medical Center, our local independent hospital.
 
Kevin Mullin, the Executive Director of the EPMC Foundation, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, November 17, at their regular noon meeting. The EPMC Foundation is the fundraising arm of the EPMC and the lead agency for the capital campaign.  Mullen will provide information about the project, and its benefits will be shared with Rotarians. 
 
Kevin Mullin
 
Mullin has served at The EPMC Foundation since March 2016 and brings over 20 years of experience in nonprofit management and fundraising.  Additionally, he has a Master of Nonprofit Management degree and has held leadership positions in organizations such as the American Red Cross, The Salvation Army and the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century.  Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend.  Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
 Building community with our immigrant neighbors
 
How can we, as a community, communicate with our immigrant neighbors? How can we get “past the doorways and into the kitchens”—the heart and soul of the lives of our immigrant neighbors?
 
Leonor Kennell, the Estes Valley Library English Language Learning Outreach Coordinator and parent educator for Spanish-speaking families for EVICS (Estes Valley Investment in Childhood Success), will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, Nov. 10, at the regular noon meeting. 
 
Kennell plans to summarize the Estes Valley Library’s efforts to reach out to English language learners and immigrants that live in our community, through current and future programming and acquisition of appropriate materials. In addition, she will highlight the library’s partnership with Intercambio, a program based in Boulder which provides materials for English language learning. Finally, she hopes to communicate how we can go beyond the typical programming and events that we do in our community.
 
With over 30 years of teaching experience in a variety of regular, special education and bilingual programs, Kennell also coordinated an adult education program, in collaboration with the National Institute for Adult Education of Mexico, which provided the opportunity for adults from Mexico to complete their primary and secondary education. The majority of her professional experience has involved working with young immigrant children and their families, which prepared her well for her current role.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
Nov. 3 meeting to be held at The Stanley
 
This week's meeting of the Rotary Club of Estes Park will be held at The Stanley Hotel. It will start at the usual time, 11:30 a.m., with lunch, compliments of the hotel management. We will meet in the Concert Hall, the building next to The Lodge.
 
The program's presenters will update us on what's new at The Stanley and share plans for the iconic hotel's future. Don't miss this chance to hear from the hotel's general manager and Marnie Cullen, owner John Cullen's sister.
 
 
Now, here's the important part. You need to contact Karol Rinehart, club administator, to let her know:
  • if you are coming to The Stanley, and
  • if you are bringing a guest.
We need a head count for meal preparation.
 
Please email Karol by Tuesday at: 
 
 kj.rinehart@centurylink.net
 
 
Thursday's program: Chase the Music
 
Founder Clark Hodge

Chase the Music has original music composed and performed for children battling critical illness. The impact of Chase the Music programs begins with the child. The magical gift of a personal commissioned piece of music is like no other. It is unique and created just for that child.  

Clark Hodge, Founder and Executive Director of Chase the Music, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, October 27, at their regular noon meeting. In 2011, Hodge conceived the concepts behind Chase the Music. He has delivered a number of pieces of music for critically ill children and he will be sharing some of this music with us.

He has dedicated his life to ensuring that Chase the Music impacts as many people as possible. He encourages everyone to Chase the Music and to never stop smiling.

Married and with two grown boys, he finds pleasure in the outdoors, in music, and in community. He has been an organizer behind multiple Guinness World Records.

Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century  Rotary clubs, around the world, initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.

The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park. Please note our new Rotary location. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m.

Scholarship fund grows, thanks to Shred-a-Thon
 
 
Saturday's Shred-a-Thon was a successful community service and fundraising event. Thank you to the following people who helped: Trudy Collar, Karen Thompson, Thor Homme, Jim Austin, Jack Boatman, Dave Evans, Madison Casey, Ken TeSelle, Wayne Andersen, Scott Thompson, Bill Smith, Gordon Slack and Phil Moenning. Marty Casey provided the delicious Cinnamon rolls and sticky buns!  Yummy! And, the boys--the Thompsons' goldens and Trudy's Palmer (not pictured).

We will clear over $1,600 this time for our scholarship fund. 
 
Great day and great crew.

Tara
Rene Moquin to discuss his Cuba trip Oct. 20 
 
 
Rene Moquin will be our speaker on Thursday, Oct. 20. He will describe his recent service trip to Cuba, partially funded with a grant from our club. 
 
Rene was born and raised in Vermont. Following high school graduation, he went West to receive his BS degree from Northern Arizona University in Political Science and Finance. He then joined International Voluntary Services to work with refugees in South Vietnam for two years. Upon his return from IVS, he secured his masters from Arizona State University and later completed the Executive Management Program at Harvard University. His career includes managing charitable foundations for nearly 30 years; serving as Regional Director for the United States Tennis Association for two years, and serving as an interim director for different non profits. He also served as an adjunct professor of social policy at UTA and TCU.
 
Joanne and Rene moved to Estes Park, Colorado in 1994. He enjoys community theater, hiking, pickle ball, traveling, time at the gym, and reading. He plays in the local Village Band and sings with the Oratorio Society. He has volunteered with international community development projects in Africa, Central America, Poland and most recently in Cuba. And, of course, we know him better as the Big Duck for the 2016 Duck Race.
 
His life’s philosophy is based on the following statement: “None of us can save the world alone, but each of us can do something”.
 
 
Oct. 13 program to feature new Land Trust Director
 
Jeffrey Boring, Executive Director of the Estes Valley Land Trust since May 2016, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, October 13, at their regular noon meeting. His presentation will focus on the history of the organization, the role the community plays in land protection and stewardship, and future projects the land trust is currently working on. 
 
Jeffrey Boring and his wife, Emily Patterson
 
The Estes Valley Land Trust, accredited in 2008, was formed to preserve open space for future generations. EVLT preserves and protects open space, valleys, wetlands, streams, ranch lands and wildlife habitat in the Estes Valley and surrounding area. Currently, EVLT has over 9600 acres under protection through 159 conservation easements.
 
A conservation easement is a mechanism by which property owners who want to ensure the land that they own is protected from future development can voluntarily enter a legal agreement with a land trust. This agreement permanently restricts certain aspects of land use in order to protect the conservation values of the property. 
 
Boring’s work in the conservation field began 18 years ago with The Nature Conservancy in Georgia, helping to direct a land protection campaign that targeted land acquisition along the 180 mile Chattahoochee River. 
 
After completing his master’s degree in Conservation Ecology, Jeffrey served as the Director of Conservation at Athens Land Trust, before moving to Colorado in 2004 to manage a water quality monitoring program for the Big Thompson Watershed Forum. For the past 8 years, he served as an Open Lands Resource Specialist in the Larimer County Natural Resources Department.  
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road.  Please note our new Rotary location. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend. Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
Youth/New Generations to be featured in Oct. 6 program
 
This week's program will put our Youth and New Generations directorship in the spotlight. Dmitri Galcovski, Youth and New Generations Director, and Sue Fereday, Exchange Program Coordinator, will present an overview of our club's work with local teens who have leadership potential. The youth committee oversees the exchange student program and RYLA (Rotary Youth Leadership Awards), two valuable opportunity for youth to grow in leadership, meet teens from the region, and travel abroad. Dmitri will share some You Tube videos that show/discuss the RYLA program from the participants' point of view.   
 
"We will discuss the challenges both of these programs are facing as well," he said.

Sept. 22 program: free enterprise, freedom's imperative by Bill Marshall

Bill Marshall, a retired Fortune 250 company treasurer and writer, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, September 22, at their regular noon meeting. His program will focus on rediscovering free enterprise, freedom’s imperative.  Please note the change in location for Rotary Club meetings.
 
Bill Marshall
According to Marshall, rediscovering free enterprise will enliven your cocktail conversation as it reveals three original insights challenging accepted wisdom on the source of freedom. His insights derive from three overlooked questions: (1) What is the difference between capitalism and free enterprise?  (2) What is the primary purpose of free enterprise?  Hint:  It is not making money.  (3) What is the fault in the practice of free enterprise, which is based originally on the writings of America’s other founding father in 1776?  He feels that this “defect” in the practice of free enterprise is the root cause of income inequality and wealth disparity in America today.
 
Marshall poses one more question, “what really is America’s economic policy?”  He believes that rediscovering free enterprise is imperative to our freedom and that of future generations.
 
Now retired, Bill Marshall was the Treasurer of Nalco Chemical Company, a Fortune 250 industrial company specializing in global water treatment. He is a former Navy Lieutenant, Naval Flight Officer and Mission Commander. He is a Distinguished Eagle Scout. Bill earned a degree in industrial engineering from LeHigh University, studied business at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, and is a graduate of the Advanced Management Program of the Harvard Business School. He is married, lives in Estes Park, and has one daughter, an equine veterinarian.
 
Marshall has written two books, Rich Shareowner, Poor Shareowner and Money Ain’t Free, both of which were selected among the year’s top investment books by “Stock Trader’s Almanac.” He is completing a third book, Rediscovering Free Enterprise:  Freedom’s Imperative.
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are 1.2 million Rotary members in 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Rotary clubs have been serving communities worldwide for more than a century. Rotary clubs around the world initiate projects that address critical issues such as conflict resolution, hunger, poverty, disease and illiteracy.
 
The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road.  Please note our new Rotary location.  Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend.  Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 
 
 
Shred-a-Thon Saturday: show up, clean up, help students
 
Is it weighing you down? Keeping you from having a clean office, a neat desk or a clutter-free storage room? Tired of feeding papers to your puny shredder, three sheets at a time? The Rotary Club of Estes Park can help you reach those paper-free goals!
 
Come and contribute your excess paperwork at the Estes Park Rotary Club Shred-a-Thon on Saturday, October 15. You can drop off your items between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. or until the truck is full. Just drive to the Event Center parking lot off of Manford Avenue in Estes Park.
 
“Community shred days are part of our commitment to the prevention of identity theft and our support for recycling,” said Tara Moenning, event coordinator.
 
Items appropriate for shredding are:
  • Old bank statements,
  • Credit card offers,
  • Cancelled checks,
  • Old medical records,
  • Paycheck stubs, or
  • Anything with your personal information.
Clips, staples, and binders do not need to be removed.
 
While there is no charge, a generous donation would be appreciated, Moenning notes. The Rotary Club sponsors the cost of the truck so that all tax-deductible, donated funds will benefit the club’s scholarship program.
 
If you can’t be there on October 15, a club member will pick up your items. Call Tara Moenning, 970-577-0186 for information on pick up.
 
 

Our Sept. 15 program: fighting weekend hunger


Terry Leija

Terry Leija, teacher and outgoing president of the Estes Park Education Association, will speak at the Rotary Club of Estes Park on Thursday, September 15, at their regular noon meeting. He will discuss efforts by EPEA to combat food insecurity and hunger in Estes Park students. Please note the change in location for Rotary Club meetings.

During the 2015-2016 school year, EPEA started the Estes Pak program, a supplemental food program. EPEA provides meals for students and families who need food on weekends throughout the school year. Leija has served as coordinator of the program.  

Leija is a second grade teacher at the Estes Park Elementary School. He has taught in Estes Park for over 20 years.

The Rotary Club of Estes Park meets Thursdays at the Rodeway Inn in Estes Park, located at 1701 North Lake Avenue on Highway 34 just west of Dry Gulch Road. Please note our new Rotary location. Visitors interested in learning more about Rotary and its programs are welcome to attend.  Buffet is served at 11:30 a.m., the Rotary business meeting opens at noon, and the program begins at 12:30 p.m. 

 
 
 
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