Members of the public have an erroneous view of the role of the Christian Council (GBCC), often thinking of it as an activist organization, a disciplinary board, or a legislative body.

This was the claim of current president Sobig Kemp during his address yesterday at the Rotary Club of Freeport's weekly meeting, where he sought to clarify the real function of the Council.

 
Members of the public have an erroneous view of the role of the Christian Council (GBCC), often thinking of it as an activist organization, a disciplinary board, or a legislative body.

This was the claim of current president Sobig Kemp during his address yesterday at the Rotary Club of Freeport's weekly meeting, where he sought to clarify the real function of the Council.

Kemp said the GBCC has a threefold purpose – to promote understanding and trust between the various parts of Christ's Church in Grand Bahama; to further Christ's mission of service in love to all people by the joint action of Christians in Grand Bahama and to witness for the Christian community on matters of social or common concern.

"You would have noticed that the Council has been addressing issues of common concern throughout the years and we will continue to do so. We have issued statements regarding very heated issues affecting community life and what the Council's position is regarding them," he said.

"Our intent in doing this is not to stir up strife and conflict, but simply to make the community aware of how God feels about the issue, and how the matter ought to be addressed."

The GBCC recently came under fire from Eight Mile Rock High School Parent Teacher Association president Troy Garvey for not being more vocal concerning the matter of sexual misconduct between teachers and students at that institution.

Garvey called on members of the Christian Council to get involved in the "everyday happenings of the country," and said this is a time when they are needed more than ever.

At the time, the GBCC had responded to Garvey's comments, saying the Council is indeed taking serious measures to address the many issues facing the school, and noted that its Youth Action Committee has been actively involved in assisting the school in recuperating "from its plethora of spiritual attacks."

In his remarks, Kemp pointed out to Rotarians that the Council is presently supported financially by an annual subscription paid by its members but that income, however, is not enough to support the operations of the Coun-cil's office in the Kipling Building downtown.

To this end, Kemp appealed to members of the public to assist in whatever way they can.

"We are in need of a number of certain key items crucial to running an office. We need $1,500 monthly to effectively operate at present. We are in need of an air conditioner, computer, printer, copier, two desks, two chairs, and a filing cabinet," he said.

"While making this appeal to the churches and their pastors, we would also like to encourage the business community to sow into the Grand Bahama Christian Council with your financial contribution."

Kemp said businesses should take the opportunity to "sow into the kingdom of God" by assisting the GBCC.

"The Council is here to serve this community, however, the level and standard of service is determinate upon the kind of support it receives from the community it serves."

Anyone interested in providing assistance to the GBCC can contact the office at 351-9344 or Kemp directly at 373-1986 or 727-1797.