PROGRAM: Lisa McGarry, volunteer coordinator for Canines for Change, spoke about the service dog organization.
 
PROGRAM: Lisa McGarry, volunteer coordinator for Canines for Change, spoke about the service dog organization.
GUESTS:  Jayson Boyers, president of Cleary University; Brian Bethner; Nancy Spore, Make a Wish; Lana Romsek, Make a Wish; Michael and Leslie Partlow, daughters Reese and Josie and grandma Cindy.
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
  • Terry Simpson announced that a Men’s Bible Study Class has begun; it meets at 7:30 a.m. Fridays at the Brighton Chamber of Commerce.
  • Collections are still being received for the Polio Plus College challenge at the front table. Oberlin College is in the early lead.
  • Piet Lindhout pointed out that a number of tools were left behind at the last Raider project.
  • Lori Lalama put out a last call to purchase Rotary Raider clothing.
  • The Partlow family attended to thank Rotary Raiders for building the gazebo to project the hot tub purchased for daughter Reese. Pictures were passed around to show how much Reese enjoys the hot tub, which has provided fantastic benefit for her. Dad Michael thanked Rotary for their assistance. Brian Donovan thanked all Raiders for their support. Nancy Spore from Make A Wish noted that the organization’s headquarters are in Brighton.
PROGRAM: Lisa McGarry informed the club about Canines for Change, an organization that she ardently volunteers for and now serves as its volunteer coordinator. The organization trains seizure response dogs, autism assistance dogs, mobility and medical assistance dogs and diabetic alert dogs. Its mission is to provide highly trained service dogs that enhance the lives of children and adults with disabilities by empowering them to maintain an independent and active lifestyle.
Trained dogs can recognized when a person has an epileptic of diabetic incident, for instance, and get help and trigger alarms for assistance. Canines for Change has five skilled Level 2 trainers and has a contract with the Epilepsy Foundation. It can cost 13,000 or more to train a epilepsy response dog. Training for dogs must start very early in their lives and it is discovered relatively soon if the dog is up to the task. Those that “wash out” make for great pets.
Lisa said that Livingston County is a great place for service dogs. They are never questioned in public places.
50-50
Joe Bottum, Terry Gill and Bill Anderson all came up empty in their quest for the Ace of Spades.