Roy Plana gave a powerful presentation on his completion of the Bataan Death March 102 km Ultra Road Race in January 2019.
 
Plana completed this challenging race in honor of his father, Richard Plana, a Bataan Death March survivor and three-year prisoner of war in the Philippines during World War II. Richard Plana served 33.5 years in the United States Army earning a chestful of medals, ribbons and commendations, including the Purple Heart, a Presidential Unit Citation with two oak leaf clusters, the Philippine Liberation Ribbon, a joint services commendation, the Army Commendation, Meritorious Service Medal, and Combat Infantry Badge. 
Roy Plana gave a powerful presentation on his completion of the Bataan Death March 102 km Ultra Road Race in January 2019.
 
Plana completed this challenging race in honor of his father, Richard Plana, a Bataan Death March survivor and three-year prisoner of war in the Philippines during World War II. Richard Plana served 33.5 years in the United States Army earning a chestful of medals, ribbons and commendations, including the Purple Heart, a Presidential Unit Citation with two oak leaf clusters, the Philippine Liberation Ribbon, a joint services commendation, the Army Commendation, Meritorious Service Medal, and Combat Infantry Badge. 
 
The Bataan Death March was a 63 mile (102 km) march that 76,000 prisoners of war (66,000 Filipinos, 10,000 Americans) were forced to endure by the Japanese military in April 1942, during the early stages of World War II. The Bataan Death March Ultra Road Race in honor of this horrific event is not for the faint of heart. The race course follows the path of the march through challenging terrain, hot temperatures, high elevation, and a massive hill the length of three football fields to the finish.
 
Roy Plana was one of only two Americans to participate and completed the race this January at 66 years old in under 17 hours. As he ran, Plana reflected on the suffering his father faced along with the thousands of prisoners.
 
During the actual Bataan Death March, 600 Americans were killed and just under 10,000 Filipinos died from the dangerous conditions. The prisoners had just six days to complete the march, walking 10 km per day receiving only a small portion of rice each day.
 
As Plana ran the path his father once trod, he demonstrated the positivity his father taught him. “My father always transferred every challenge into an opportunity,” said Plana. “He is my hero.”
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