Rotary Club of Norwood

Executive Board

President
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Immediate Past President
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Treasurer
Sergeant-At-Arms
 

Message from our President

 
April 2014
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Club Information

Welcome to the Rotary Club of Norwood
. . . Chartered April Nineteenth, 1926 . . .

Norwood

Service Above Self

Every other Wednesday at 6 PM
Business Meeting at 6:15 PM
Heffernan Conference Room 1st Floor Draper Bldg @ Norwood Hospital
800 Washington Street
Norwood, MA  02062
United States
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Our Email Address

                 RotaryClubofNorwood@gmail.com
 
 
The Object of Rotary is to encourage and foster the ideal of service as a basis of worthy enterprise, and in particular, to encourage and foster: ONE. The development of acquaintance as an opportunity for service; SECOND. High ethical standards in business and professions, the recognition of the worthiness of all useful occupations and the dignifying of each Rotarian's occupation as an opportunity to serve society; THIRD. The application of the ideal of service in each Rotarian's personal, business, and community life; FOURTH. The advancement of international understanding, goodwill, and peace through a world fellowship of business and professional persons united in the ideal of service.
 

 
 
One of the most widely printed and quoted statements of business ethics in the world is the Rotary "4-Way Test."It was created by Rotarian Herbert J. Taylor in 1932 when he was asked to take charge of the Chicago-based Club Aluminum Company, which was facing bankruptcy. Taylor looked for a way to save the struggling company mired in depression-caused financial difficulties. He drew up a 24-word code of ethics for all employees to follow in their business and professional lives. The 4-Way Test became the guide for sales, production, advertising and all relations with dealers and customers, and the survival of the company was credited to this simple philosophy. Herb Taylor became President of Rotary International during 1954-1955. The 4-Way Test was adopted by Rotary in 1943 and has been translated into more than 100 languages and published in thousands of ways. The message should be known and followed by all Rotarians. "Of the things we think say or do: 1. Is it the TRUTH? 2. Is it FAIR to all concerned? 3. Will it build GOODWILL and BETTER FRIENDSHIPS? 4. Will it be BENEFICIAL to all concerned?"
 
 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

NEW DELHI (AP) - India marked three years Monday since its last reported polio case, putting the country on course to being formally declared free of the disease later this year.

India has made great strides against polio in recent years through a rigorous vaccination campaign. But for many in India, where polio victims with withered, twisted limbs are a common sight on the streets, these advances have come too late.

"My parents were very poor and couldn't afford medical treatment for me," said Sonu Kumar, 24, who contracted the disease when he was 10. Paralyzed from the waist down, he begs outside a temple in central Delhi and uses a wheelchair to move around.

Polio is a vaccine-preventable disease that has been eradicated in most countries. But it still causes paralysis or death in some parts of the world, including Nigeria, Pakistan and Afghanistan.

Polio usually infects children under age 5 when they drink contaminated water. The virus attacks the central nervous system, causing paralysis, muscular atrophy, deformation and, in some cases, death.

"India was once thought to be the most difficult country in which to achieve polio eradication," Global Polio Eradication Initiative said in a statement.

Monday's milestone was significant, but the World Health Organization stills need to confirm there are no undetected cases before making the official declaration that India is polio-free in March.

Still, Junior Home Minister R.P.N. Singh sent a triumphant message on Twitter: "Proud day for all of us as Indians ... India is polio free for three years."

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 The sign that the Rotary Club of Norwood sponsored to Welcome Home Norwood's Veterans. 
We welcome back SPC Diego Silva, who was our guest recently, at our meeting.
 

 
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District 7950

Governor

Dietrich Bilger

Welcomes You

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DECEMBER 2013

 

Dear Rotarians in District 7950,
 
We have entered the season at the end of the calendar year where the observance of traditions hold us to be grateful and thankful for all we have experienced and received in our lives. At the same time we are looking forward to give to others to provide joy and happiness, to help those where is need.
 
The Clubs in our District 7950 have reason to celebrate the season, as virtually every Club has embraced and committed to donate an average of $100 per member to the Rotary Foundation during this Rotary year as its goal. Most Clubs are working towards this goal by encouraging and facilitating individual giving by members and substituting this through fundraising programs at the Club level.
 
Put together, this is a record for the District and each one of you is to be congratulated for this commitment towards the Rotary Foundation! It truly represents service above self and I am grateful and thankful to each one of you!
 
The Rotary Foundation is the one Foundation through which Clubs and each of its member can either directly (by having it subsidize through grants your Club’s own programs), or indirectly (by enabling the Rotary Foundation supporting humanitarian programs worldwide) address local or international need.
 
 
 
 

PolioPlus, the most ambitious program in Rotary's history, is the volunteer arm of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative. For more than 25 years, Rotary has led the private sector in the global effort to rid the world of this crippling disease. Today, PolioPlus and its role in the initiative is recognized worldwide as a model of public-private cooperation in pursuit of a humanitarian goal.

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August - Membership and Extension
September - New Generations
October - Vocational Service
November - Rotary Foundation
December - Family Life
January- Rotary Understanding
February - World Understanding
March - Literacy
April - Rotary Magazine
June - Fellowship

 

 
 
In addition to our web site, you can also find us on facebook.  Just click on the link in our Club Web Links Section on the right hand side of our Home page.
 

 
 

 Literacy is so important to Rotary International, that an entire month of the Rotary Year is devoted to focusing our attention on it.  In 1985, Rotary declared basic literacy to be a pre-condition to the development of peace. Through this organizational emphasis, more than half the world's 33,000 Rotary clubs address the full range of literacy and mathematical challenges for primary, vocational and adult learners as well as teacher training.

 
 
 
ImageThe world's first service club, the Rotary Club of Chicago was formed on February 23 1905 by Paul P. Harris, an attorney who wished to capture in a professional club the same friendly spirit he had felt in the small towns of his youth, with Gustavus Loehr, Silvester Schiele , and Hiram Shorey.The club's first constitution adopted in January 1906 makes no reference to gender, referring only to "persons". For the next seven decades the issue of women as members would be debated by Rotarians all over the world, including the members of the Rotary Club of Norwood which was formed just twenty years after the first Rotary Club, on April 19, 1926. 
In 1911 an all-women's Rotary Club was formed in Minneapolis and between 1911 and 1917 an all women's Rotary Club existed in Duluth, Minnesota alongside the men's club, which exists to this day as an all woman Rotary Club. In 1912, the Belfast, Northern Ireland club and The RI Duluth Convention discussed the admission of women but rejected the idea. This was to happen at every convention until 1921, when at the International Convention in Edinburgh, Scotland the Standard Club Constitution was produced in which Article 2, Section III stated "A Rotary Club shall be comprised of men.
 
 
 

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Jan 20, 2014

 
 
 
 
 
 

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