Rotary District 6540
Northern Indiana, U.S.A.
 
Roger Sims, District Governor
Home Club:  Munster Rotary Club
Munster, Indiana
 
 

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District 6540 Club Locator

 

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ClubRunner users:  Your District login and password is the same as what you use for your home club site. 


Non-ClubRunner users:  Send an email to Steve Sorenson at steve.rotary6540@yahoo.com.  Please include your name, email address, and home club in the body of the email.  Only District 6540 members can be registered on this site.

 
Contact Us 
John Smith
District Secretary
 
 
260-410-9326 Phone
 
Mailing Address:
5307 Cloverbrook Dr
Fort Wayne, IN 46806
 
For Website Related Issues: 
PDG Steve Sorenson
Email: steve.rotary6540@yahoo.com
 
 
 
 
 
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June, 2016

British writer and Royal Air Force pilot Roald Dahl was also an avid photographer who carried his beloved Zeiss camera on his many adventures. At a time when each photograph had to be laboriously developed by hand, on film or glass plate negatives, he amassed a collection of hundreds of images. In later years, these photographs served as a visual record of his travels, a way to document his experiences and share them with others. Yet he always spoke of his memories as being far more vivid than the photographs could ever reflect. So many events and experiences, he said, were simply impossible to capture; they could not be adequately conveyed in images or words.
 
Language may fail, and photographs fade; minds are fallible, and details are lost. But some experiences, as Dahl said, never dim; they stand out in our memories, even after decades, as a wall of flame. They rear up forever over the landscape of our past, dividing our lives into what came before and what came after.
 
That metaphor has stayed with me throughout the past year as I have traveled the world for Rotary. For indeed, this entire year has stood, and will always stand, as a wall of flame in my mind, dividing my life into before and after.
 
When I think back over these 12 months, I see a bright kaleidoscope of images cascading before my eyes, day after day, week after week. The anxious parents in Chandigarh, India, hovering at the bedside of the child recovering from lifesaving heart surgery. The bright flags of Nepal fluttering over an entire village that had been rebuilt after the devastating earthquake. The feeling of awe in St. Peter’s Square at the Jubilee of Rotarians celebrated by Pope Francis. Joyful gatherings around the world, in so many countries, in so many languages – with friends I had never before met, my brothers and sisters in Rotary.
 
To serve as president of Rotary International is a colossal undertaking, one that cannot be truly conveyed in images or words. It is a wall of flame that will burn forever in my memory, dancing with light, shifting in shadow. A thousand images jostle together in my mind, a thousand recollections, a thousand emotions. Together, they form a great mosaic; together, they show the bright and glorious work of your hands.
 
As this Rotary year draws to a close, I am prouder than ever to be part of this great organization: one that makes the world not poorer, but richer; replaces despair with hope; raises up those whom fate has brought low; and is a gift to so many, while allowing each of us to Be a Gift to the World.
 

K.R. "Ravi" Ravindran
President, Rotary International

 

 
 
June, 2016
 
Western movies were the most popular film genre for several decades, and they were well known around the world. In many of them, after a victorious battle between the good guys and the bad guys, the hero would accept the appreciation of his friends and supporters – and then ride off alone into the sunset.
 
I won’t be alone due to my Rotary friends, but I will be riding into the Rotary sunset on 30 June, and I can’t avoid the comparison, because my life has been much like a movie for more than 50 years. From the time I was selected as a Rotary Scholar in 1959, good things started happening for me, and they have continued in much the same way as they did in the heartwarming movies of yesteryear.
 
Due to my Rotary Foundation scholarship to study in South Africa, my life has been an amazing adventure. I never dreamed when I was sailing from New Orleans to Cape Town on a Lykes Line freighter ship in 1961 that I would be the presiding officer at the 2011 Rotary Convention in that same port city of New Orleans exactly 50 years later. But it happened, and I truly have a deep appreciation and passion for The Rotary Foundation.
 
I also am fortunate that I found a way to utilize my farm heritage with the music and lyrics of “Cowboy Logic” and the wisdom of the Code of the West as recited in the book Cowboy Ethics. It has been a signal honor to play a role in the fantastic story of Rotary as it has emerged onto the world stage. But above all else, I am proud to acknowledge that I am a living, breathing product of The Rotary Foundation – because I was a Rotary Scholar.
 
The End
 
Ray Klinginsmith
Foundation Trustee Chair 2015 - 2016
 

 

Come join us and make the world a better place!  Please take just a couple of minutes to review this video, and find out more about Rotary in a community near you.  Welcome to Rotary!

 

 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Rotary’s founder, Paul Harris, believed that serving humanity is “the most worthwhile thing a person can do,” RI President-elect John F. Germ said, and that being a part of Rotary is a “great opportunity” to make that happen.

Germ unveiled the 2016-17 presidential theme, Rotary Serving Humanity, to incoming district governors on 18 January at the International Assembly in San Diego, California, USA.

“I believe everyone recognizes the opportunity to serve Rotary for what it truly is: not a small opportunity, but a great one; an opportunity of a lifetime to change the world for the better, forever through Rotary’s service to humanity,” said Germ.

Rotary members around the globe are serving humanity by providing clean water to underdeveloped communities, promoting peace in conflict areas, and strengthening communities through basic education and literacy. But none more important than our work to eradicate polio worldwide, he said.

After a historic year in which transmission of the wild poliovirus was stopped in Nigeria and all of Africa, Germ said we are closer than ever to ending polio.

“We are at a crossroads in Rotary,” he added. “We are looking ahead at a year that may one day be known as the greatest year in Rotary’s history: the year that sees the world’s last case of polio.”

Last year’s milestones leave just two countries, Afghanistan and Pakistan, where the virus still circulates. Polio would be only the second human disease ever to be eradicated.

When that moment arrives, it’s “tremendously important” that Rotary is ready for it, said Germ. “We need to be sure that we are recognized for that success, and leverage that success into more partnerships, greater growth, and even more ambitious service in the decades to come.”

Germ, a member of the Rotary Club of Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA, encouraged attendees to return to their clubs and communities and spread the word about Rotary’s role in the fight for a polio-free world.

“People who want to do good will see that Rotary is a place where they can change the world. Every Rotary club needs to be ready to give them that opportunity,” Germ said.

Enhancing Rotary’s image isn’t the only way to boost membership. “We need clubs that are flexible, so our service will be more attractive to younger members, recent retirees, and working people.”

He added: “We need more willing hands, more caring hearts, and more bright minds to move our work forward.”


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Have you thought about what your Rotary legacy will be?

The Permanent Fund builds long-term stability for the future of The Rotary Foundation of Rotary International by providing an extra stream of income to meet an increasing demand for the Foundation's educational, humanitarian, and cultural programs.  We invite you to invest in tomorrow by joining Rotarians around the world, and throughout District 6540 in their efforts to improve and enrich lives of people around the globe.

A Benefactor of The Rotary Foundation is anyone who informs The Rotary Foundation in writing that he or she has made a provision in his or her will or other estate plan, naming the Foundation's Permanent Fund as a beneficiary; or by making an outright gift of $1,000 or more to the Permanent Fund.  Benefactor recognition consists of a certificate and insignia (Angel Wings) to be worn with a Rotary pin.

The Rotary Foundation also recognizes those couples or individuals who have made commitments in their estate plans totaling $10,000 or more, as a Bequest Society Member.  Donors may elect to receive an engraved crystal recognition piece and a Diamond Circle pin commemorating the commitment.

This support goes above and beyond your current Every Rotarian Every Year (EREY) annual contributions to The Rotary Foundation.  It is a commitment to the future in your estate planning.  

If you would like to receive a gift commitment card to complete, please contact any member of the Rotary District 6540 Foundation Committee or any member of the District Leadership Team.  Your legacy will make a lasting difference in the world!  Thank you for your consideration.

 

 
 
 
Engaging the Next Generation in Rotary
 
Only 2% of worldwide Rotary membership is under the age of 30.  In an article written for “Rotary on the Move” by Michael McQueen, a leading authority in youth & strategies for engaging with Gen Y, 5 strategies for growing your club with young members is offered. McQueen explains that contrary to their “self-centered reputation”, Gen Y “crave community and truly want to make a difference.”  “This generation, having been raised to be confident and to have self-esteem, truly believe they can make a difference” states McQueen. 
 
At its core, the  5 strategies require a local club to examine not only the local demographic to identify prospective Gen Y Rotary candidates, but determine if the purpose and goals of their own club are truly inspirational to attract the next generation craving purpose.
 
The 5 strategies are:
 
1. Look Back to Plan Forward
 
Where to find the next generation?  According to McQueen, they are all around if we only look a bit more closely.  Look at participants in club and district programs like RYLA, youth exchange, Interact or Rotaract clubs and other young people who have benefited from your clubs projects and programs.   They may be waiting to be asked.
 
2. Start Small
 
Young people, according to McQueen, are often hesitant to make long term commitments, therefore he suggests inviting them to be part of well defined, targeted short term projects and to use this as a jumping off point to increase their awareness of Rotary and to build relationships.  A well-defined project is one in that is adequately planned, the purpose and outcomes are clear and valued by the volunteers.  McQueen suggests with this strategy that local clubs analyze the opportunity that their projects and programs give volunteers to make a difference or impact someone’s life. 
 
3. Focus on Outcomes Rather Than Process
 
McQueen tells us that more involvement of young people in local clubs and their programs and projects may challenge the status quo.  He reminds us that this is a good thing and to realize that this reflects two things, one is take this as an opportunity to inform and educate and two is for local clubs to reflect on why they do what they do and does the purpose result in tangible benefits and outcomes.  McQueen reminds us that, “Gen Y are action-oriented….what does matter is that the outcomes and purpose are explicitly clear from the outset.”
 
4. Use Stories to Get your Message Through
 
Communicating with Gen Y through stories which tell of the impact of Rotary from a personal impact is more inspiring then reciting a long list of facts and figures according to McQueen.   Telling these stories not only will tell why Rotarians do what they do but also tell more about why service through Rotary is a great experience.
 
5. Concentrate on Common Purpose Not Common Interests
 
McQueen reminds us that as members of an international organization Rotarians have a history of working together with other Rotarians from diverse cultures.  As Rotarians we need to use the same drive to work together for common purpose around the world and focus this drive to open the door of the opportunity to serve to young people. 
 
Full article available at:
 

 

By Arnold Grahl, Rotary International News –

 

Luanne Triolo was several weeks into a challenge to wear her Rotary pin for 60 days straight when she realized she had missed a day.

 

So the 2009-10 president of the Rotary Club of Carol Stream, Illinois, USA, started all over again to meet the challenge William Ferreira, governor of District 6440, had set before all his club presidents.

 

"You get used to it. It's something that is really good to do," says Triolo. "Different pins do catch people's eye in different ways."

Many Rotarians are serious about wearing their Rotary pins. Eugene Beil, past governor of District 6950 (Florida, USA) and a member of the Rotary Club of Hudson, tapped into that dedication recently when he started a discussion thread on RI's official LinkedIn group, asking Rotarians whether they wear their pins every day or just for meetings. The discussion has prompted more than 190 comments.

 

"I am happy with the feedback," Beil says. "I feel strongly about the value of wearing the pin every day. Whether you are at the grocery store, at work, or anywhere, you never know when a stranger is going to notice and you have an opportunity to explain Rotary to them."

Tony Quinn, governor of District 1200 (England), notes on the LinkedIn thread that Rotarians agree to wear their pins at all times when they are inducted.

 

 
 
 
 

Interact is Rotary International's service club for young people ages 12 to 18. Interact clubs are sponsored by individual Rotary clubs, which provide support and guidance, but they are self-governing and self-supporting.

 

Club membership varies greatly. Clubs can be single gender or mixed, large or small. They can draw from the student body of a single high school or from two or more high schools in the same community.

 

Each year, Interact clubs complete at least two community service projects, one of which furthers international understanding and goodwill. Through these efforts, Interactors develop a network of friendships with local and overseas clubs and learn the importance of - Developing leadership skills and personal integrity - Demonstrating helpfulness and respect for others - Understanding the value of individual responsibility and hard work - Advancing international understanding and goodwill.

 

As one of the most significant and fastest-growing programs of Rotary service, with more than 10,700 clubs in 109 countries and geographical areas, Interact has become a worldwide phenomenon. Almost 200,000 young people are involved in Interact.

 

Could this be a possibility for students at your local high school? This could be a great opportunity for your Rotary Club to sponsor this program at our local high school.  Let's see what we can do as Rotarians to expand this program throughout District 6540.

 

 

 

ClubRunner is very excited to announce that the ClubRunner Mobile App is now available for download!  The ClubRunner Mobile App is your key to connect to your ClubRunner website on the go!  Completely, free to download and use, this app will let you do what you need to run your club effectively while you're on the go.  Password protected just like your website, the ClubRunner Mobile app is comprised of 3 main modules.  You now will have the ability to view your member directory, view the articles posted to your website and locate the nearest club right from your iPhone or iPod, bringing you even closer to being able to connect, collaborate and communicate!

 

 

 
Rotary International has many great videos to inform and entertain.  Whether you're looking for a video to promote your local club initiative, or to show during a presentation, RI has a great selection.  Click HERE for the YouTube RI page.
 

 
 
 
 
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textpolio

 Click here to donate any amount online!
 
 
 
 

Almost isn't good enough 
   Bruce Aylward: How we'll stop polio for good
    EXCELLENT video!

 

 
Rotary Int'l Insurance Information

The following Username and Password will be required to enter the Liability Insurance site.  The Username and Password are case sensitive.  The portal is for US clubs only.

Username:  Rotarian

Password:  Resources#1

• 2015 - 2016 Letter to Insured U.S. Rotary Clubs and Districts

General Liability Insurance Summary

• Request for Liability Certificate of Insurance

• Directors & Officers/Employment Practices Liability Insurance Summary

 

Come Join Us

Inspired by the work of Rotary International

When I see a need, I like to lend a hand.
We all need someone to understand.
That there are people in this world
Who really need us now.  
It's up to each of us to figure out how.

We are calling out around the world,
"Come Join Us!"
There is work for you and me.
We are building communities
and bridging continents
All around ... all around ... the world.

When I hear the call, "Service above self."
It's just not a slogan on my office shelf.
It's the way I choose to live.
The hand I have to give.
Thankful for the chance to give of myself.

We are calling out around the world,
"Come Join Us!"
There is work for you and me.
We are building communities
and bridging continents
All around ... all around ... the world.

Repeat Chorus ...
We are calling out around the world,
"Come Join Us!"

Words & music copyright 2010 Jerry Mills
Reprinted with permission
http://www.jerrymills.com 

 Click here for a lyric sheet and
information about the song.