Rotary District 6540
Northern Indiana, U.S.A.
 
Roger Sims, District Governor
Home Club:  Munster Rotary Club
Munster, Indiana
 
 

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District 6540 Club Locator

 

Did you know? 
ClubRunner users:  Your District login and password is the same as what you use for your home club site. 


Non-ClubRunner users:  Send an email to Steve Sorenson at steve.rotary6540@yahoo.com.  Please include your name, email address, and home club in the body of the email.  Only District 6540 members can be registered on this site.

 
Contact Us 
John Smith
District Secretary
 
 
260-410-9326 Phone
 
Mailing Address:
5307 Cloverbrook Dr
Fort Wayne, IN 46806
 
For Website Related Issues: 
PDG Steve Sorenson
Email: steve.rotary6540@yahoo.com
 
 
 
 
 
What's New?
 
The upcoming 2016 Rotary International Convention in Seoul, Korea, will be the start of the push for the Atlanta Convention next year.  This May 28th will be the first day that Rotarians can register for the Atlanta Convention in 2017, with a special discounted rate of $265 for the first ten days only of registration.  Go to http://www.riconvention.org/to register to attend.  What a great opportunity to attend an RI Convention right here in the United States.  We hope to see several of you there.
 
 

 
 
While the world hopes for peace, Rotary International - a humanitarian service organization dedicated to world peace and understanding – works to make it a reality by training the next generation of peace leaders.  Rotary clubs throughout District 6540 are now recruiting for the Rotary Peace Fellowship, a program that gives up to 100 fellows the opportunity to obtain professional development certificates or master’s degrees in Peace and Conflict Resolution.
 
“Today, there are still far too few mediators who are experienced practitioners in conflict resolution. There is an urgent need to produce another generation of people who can play a mediating role in the future,” said Professor Paul Rogers, University of Bradford. “This program is the most significant development in graduate work in conflict resolution in decades.”
 
Launched in 2002, Rotary’s Peace Fellowship program provides academic and practical training to prepare scholars for leadership roles in solving conflicts around the world. Up to 100 fellows are selected every year in a globally competitive process based on personal, academic, and professional achievements. Fellows embark on one to two years of study to earn a master’s-level degree or a 3-month professional development certificate in peace and conflict studies at one of six Rotary Peace Centers at leading universities in Australia, England, Japan, Sweden, the United States, and Thailand.
 
To learn more about the program, applicants are encouraged to visit the Rotary Peace Centers website at www.rotary.org/rotarycenters
 
Interested applicants can also contact their local Rotary Club representative, or our District Scholarship Chair:  Dr. Ranjan Kini, rkini@comcast.net, (219) 322-4313
 
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders united worldwide who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are approximately 1.2 million Rotarians who are members of more than 34,000 Rotary clubs in over 200 countries. For more information, visit www.rotary.org.
 
 

 
 
This Rotary Year we have an exciting opportunity to experience Rotary in a worldly manner.  Due to the great work of Chairperson Dawn Harvey (Huntington) and her committee, District Rotarians can visit Rotarians in Turkey in District 2430.  This is the eastern ¾ of Turkey and the second largest Rotary District geographically.  The attached one page brochure provides important details and contact information.
 
Rotarians from our District may wish to travel together.  The most direct flight is using Turkish Airlines nonstop from Chicago to Istanbul.  Other Rotarians could possibly connect from Fort Wayne or South Bend to Chicago on United.  Fares from Chicago run about $1250 at present depending on the day of the week.  Of course Rotarians are free to choose whatever travel arrangement they want especially if using Frequent Flyer miles/airline points or making stopovers before/after the trip.
 
Menno Travel in Goshen is a good travel agent if you are looking for one and they are familiar with Rotary travelers.
 
For more detailed information regarding the trip, click on the 2016 Rotary Friendship Exchange to Turkey, under Home Page Download Files on the left side of this page.  Come join the fun and education, and have a Rotary Worldly experience!                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
 
 

 
 

May, 2016

Some years ago, in the Kano plains of Kenya, a well-meaning development agency took on the task of improving water availability to a rural community. Committees were formed, meetings were held, and the local people were consulted. The main need the community identified was improved delivery of water for irrigation and livestock. A plan to meet this need was created, and the work was soon begun, exactly as the community representatives had requested.
 
Yet once construction began, it was met by immediate protest from groups of community women, who came to the site and physically blocked workers from building diversion channels. Upon further investigation, the agency realized that the water it was diverting for farming came from the only source, for dozens of families, of water for cooking, drinking, and washing. The entire project had to be scrapped.
 
Why? Because it had never occurred to a single member of the all-male team in charge to consult the local women. At every stage, it was assumed that the men knew the needs, spoke for the community, and were able to represent it. Clearly, this was far from the case. The women knew the needs of the community, and its resources, far better – but their opinion was never sought.
 
We have had women in Rotary for only the last quarter of our history, and it is no coincidence that those years have been by far our most productive. In 1995, only 1 in 20 Rotarians were women; today, that number has risen to 1 in 5. It is progress, but it is not enough. It is only common sense that if we want to represent our communities, we must reflect our communities, and if we want to serve our communities fully, we must be sure that our communities are fully represented in Rotary.
 
Rotary’s policy on gender equality is absolutely clear. Yet nearly one-fifth of our clubs still refuse to admit women, usually by claiming that they simply cannot find women who are qualified for membership. I would say that any Rotarian who makes this argument, or believes it, himself lacks the two most basic qualifications for Rotary membership: honesty and good sense.
 
A club that shuts out women shuts out much more than half the talent, half the ability, and half the connections it should have. It closes out the perspectives that are essential to serving families and communities effectively. It damages not only its own service but our entire organization, by reinforcing the stereotypes that limit us the most. It leads our partners to take us less seriously, and it makes all of Rotary less attractive to potential members, especially the young people who are so crucial to our future.
 
To tolerate discrimination against women is to doom our organization to irrelevance. We cannot pretend that we still live in Paul Harris’ time, nor would he ever want us to. For, as he said, “The story of Rotary will have to be written again and again.” Let us see to it that the story we write in Rotary is one of which he would be proud.
 

K.R. "Ravi" Ravindran
President, Rotary International

 

 
 
May, 2016
 
The 100th anniversary of The Rotary Foundation will occur in June of next year, and a full year of activities is planned leading up to it, starting with the 2016 convention in Seoul and culminating with the 2017 convention in Atlanta. I remember well the excitement of the Rotary centennial in 2004-05, and I hope that Rotarians worldwide will treat the Foundation’s centennial with the same enthusiasm!
 
The centennial celebration will launch at the Seoul convention, and the entire general session on Tuesday morning will feature the Foundation’s programs. However, it is the activities of clubs and districts that will determine the success of the centennial celebration. To assist in the planning of centenary events, the Rotary Resource Center in the House of Friendship in Seoul will offer Rotarians helpful materials and ideas.
 

For Rotarians who are unable to attend the convention, the same materials will be available for download at . The tool kit includes:

  • Ideas and activities for clubs and districts
  • Promotional flier and bookmark for the centennial book, Doing Good in the World
  • Promotional postcard
  • Sample press release for clubs to promote activities in their communities
  • History of The Rotary Foundation PowerPoint
  • Centennial letterhead and PowerPoint template
  • Centennial video (highly recommended)
  • Centennial logo
Rotary would not be as strong and vibrant as it is today without the tremendous support of The Rotary Foundation, and it is now time to celebrate its 100th birthday. Rotary is a grassroots organization with more than 35,000 clubs, most of which have directly benefited from support of The Rotary Foundation. Therefore, I truly hope that all of you – and your clubs – will show your appreciation for the Foundation that Rotary created for the purpose of Doing Good in the World!
 
Ray Klinginsmith
Foundation Trustee Chair 2015 - 2016
 

 

Come join us and make the world a better place!  Please take just a couple of minutes to review this video, and find out more about Rotary in a community near you.  Welcome to Rotary!

 

 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Rotary’s founder, Paul Harris, believed that serving humanity is “the most worthwhile thing a person can do,” RI President-elect John F. Germ said, and that being a part of Rotary is a “great opportunity” to make that happen.

Germ unveiled the 2016-17 presidential theme, Rotary Serving Humanity, to incoming district governors on 18 January at the International Assembly in San Diego, California, USA.

“I believe everyone recognizes the opportunity to serve Rotary for what it truly is: not a small opportunity, but a great one; an opportunity of a lifetime to change the world for the better, forever through Rotary’s service to humanity,” said Germ.

Rotary members around the globe are serving humanity by providing clean water to underdeveloped communities, promoting peace in conflict areas, and strengthening communities through basic education and literacy. But none more important than our work to eradicate polio worldwide, he said.

After a historic year in which transmission of the wild poliovirus was stopped in Nigeria and all of Africa, Germ said we are closer than ever to ending polio.

“We are at a crossroads in Rotary,” he added. “We are looking ahead at a year that may one day be known as the greatest year in Rotary’s history: the year that sees the world’s last case of polio.”

Last year’s milestones leave just two countries, Afghanistan and Pakistan, where the virus still circulates. Polio would be only the second human disease ever to be eradicated.

When that moment arrives, it’s “tremendously important” that Rotary is ready for it, said Germ. “We need to be sure that we are recognized for that success, and leverage that success into more partnerships, greater growth, and even more ambitious service in the decades to come.”

Germ, a member of the Rotary Club of Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA, encouraged attendees to return to their clubs and communities and spread the word about Rotary’s role in the fight for a polio-free world.

“People who want to do good will see that Rotary is a place where they can change the world. Every Rotary club needs to be ready to give them that opportunity,” Germ said.

Enhancing Rotary’s image isn’t the only way to boost membership. “We need clubs that are flexible, so our service will be more attractive to younger members, recent retirees, and working people.”

He added: “We need more willing hands, more caring hearts, and more bright minds to move our work forward.”


Download 2016-17
Follow the assembly on and using #IA2016
Download

 

 
 
 

Have you thought about what your Rotary legacy will be?

The Permanent Fund builds long-term stability for the future of The Rotary Foundation of Rotary International by providing an extra stream of income to meet an increasing demand for the Foundation's educational, humanitarian, and cultural programs.  We invite you to invest in tomorrow by joining Rotarians around the world, and throughout District 6540 in their efforts to improve and enrich lives of people around the globe.

A Benefactor of The Rotary Foundation is anyone who informs The Rotary Foundation in writing that he or she has made a provision in his or her will or other estate plan, naming the Foundation's Permanent Fund as a beneficiary; or by making an outright gift of $1,000 or more to the Permanent Fund.  Benefactor recognition consists of a certificate and insignia (Angel Wings) to be worn with a Rotary pin.

The Rotary Foundation also recognizes those couples or individuals who have made commitments in their estate plans totaling $10,000 or more, as a Bequest Society Member.  Donors may elect to receive an engraved crystal recognition piece and a Diamond Circle pin commemorating the commitment.

This support goes above and beyond your current Every Rotarian Every Year (EREY) annual contributions to The Rotary Foundation.  It is a commitment to the future in your estate planning.  

If you would like to receive a gift commitment card to complete, please contact any member of the Rotary District 6540 Foundation Committee or any member of the District Leadership Team.  Your legacy will make a lasting difference in the world!  Thank you for your consideration.

 

 
 
 
Engaging the Next Generation in Rotary
 
Only 2% of worldwide Rotary membership is under the age of 30.  In an article written for “Rotary on the Move” by Michael McQueen, a leading authority in youth & strategies for engaging with Gen Y, 5 strategies for growing your club with young members is offered. McQueen explains that contrary to their “self-centered reputation”, Gen Y “crave community and truly want to make a difference.”  “This generation, having been raised to be confident and to have self-esteem, truly believe they can make a difference” states McQueen. 
 
At its core, the  5 strategies require a local club to examine not only the local demographic to identify prospective Gen Y Rotary candidates, but determine if the purpose and goals of their own club are truly inspirational to attract the next generation craving purpose.
 
The 5 strategies are:
 
1. Look Back to Plan Forward
 
Where to find the next generation?  According to McQueen, they are all around if we only look a bit more closely.  Look at participants in club and district programs like RYLA, youth exchange, Interact or Rotaract clubs and other young people who have benefited from your clubs projects and programs.   They may be waiting to be asked.
 
2. Start Small
 
Young people, according to McQueen, are often hesitant to make long term commitments, therefore he suggests inviting them to be part of well defined, targeted short term projects and to use this as a jumping off point to increase their awareness of Rotary and to build relationships.  A well-defined project is one in that is adequately planned, the purpose and outcomes are clear and valued by the volunteers.  McQueen suggests with this strategy that local clubs analyze the opportunity that their projects and programs give volunteers to make a difference or impact someone’s life. 
 
3. Focus on Outcomes Rather Than Process
 
McQueen tells us that more involvement of young people in local clubs and their programs and projects may challenge the status quo.  He reminds us that this is a good thing and to realize that this reflects two things, one is take this as an opportunity to inform and educate and two is for local clubs to reflect on why they do what they do and does the purpose result in tangible benefits and outcomes.  McQueen reminds us that, “Gen Y are action-oriented….what does matter is that the outcomes and purpose are explicitly clear from the outset.”
 
4. Use Stories to Get your Message Through
 
Communicating with Gen Y through stories which tell of the impact of Rotary from a personal impact is more inspiring then reciting a long list of facts and figures according to McQueen.   Telling these stories not only will tell why Rotarians do what they do but also tell more about why service through Rotary is a great experience.
 
5. Concentrate on Common Purpose Not Common Interests
 
McQueen reminds us that as members of an international organization Rotarians have a history of working together with other Rotarians from diverse cultures.  As Rotarians we need to use the same drive to work together for common purpose around the world and focus this drive to open the door of the opportunity to serve to young people. 
 
Full article available at:
 

 

By Arnold Grahl, Rotary International News –

 

Luanne Triolo was several weeks into a challenge to wear her Rotary pin for 60 days straight when she realized she had missed a day.

 

So the 2009-10 president of the Rotary Club of Carol Stream, Illinois, USA, started all over again to meet the challenge William Ferreira, governor of District 6440, had set before all his club presidents.

 

"You get used to it. It's something that is really good to do," says Triolo. "Different pins do catch people's eye in different ways."

Many Rotarians are serious about wearing their Rotary pins. Eugene Beil, past governor of District 6950 (Florida, USA) and a member of the Rotary Club of Hudson, tapped into that dedication recently when he started a discussion thread on RI's official LinkedIn group, asking Rotarians whether they wear their pins every day or just for meetings. The discussion has prompted more than 190 comments.

 

"I am happy with the feedback," Beil says. "I feel strongly about the value of wearing the pin every day. Whether you are at the grocery store, at work, or anywhere, you never know when a stranger is going to notice and you have an opportunity to explain Rotary to them."

Tony Quinn, governor of District 1200 (England), notes on the LinkedIn thread that Rotarians agree to wear their pins at all times when they are inducted.

 

 
 
 
 

Interact is Rotary International's service club for young people ages 12 to 18. Interact clubs are sponsored by individual Rotary clubs, which provide support and guidance, but they are self-governing and self-supporting.

 

Club membership varies greatly. Clubs can be single gender or mixed, large or small. They can draw from the student body of a single high school or from two or more high schools in the same community.

 

Each year, Interact clubs complete at least two community service projects, one of which furthers international understanding and goodwill. Through these efforts, Interactors develop a network of friendships with local and overseas clubs and learn the importance of - Developing leadership skills and personal integrity - Demonstrating helpfulness and respect for others - Understanding the value of individual responsibility and hard work - Advancing international understanding and goodwill.

 

As one of the most significant and fastest-growing programs of Rotary service, with more than 10,700 clubs in 109 countries and geographical areas, Interact has become a worldwide phenomenon. Almost 200,000 young people are involved in Interact.

 

Could this be a possibility for students at your local high school? This could be a great opportunity for your Rotary Club to sponsor this program at our local high school.  Let's see what we can do as Rotarians to expand this program throughout District 6540.

 

 

 

ClubRunner is very excited to announce that the ClubRunner Mobile App is now available for download!  The ClubRunner Mobile App is your key to connect to your ClubRunner website on the go!  Completely, free to download and use, this app will let you do what you need to run your club effectively while you're on the go.  Password protected just like your website, the ClubRunner Mobile app is comprised of 3 main modules.  You now will have the ability to view your member directory, view the articles posted to your website and locate the nearest club right from your iPhone or iPod, bringing you even closer to being able to connect, collaborate and communicate!

 

 

 
Rotary International has many great videos to inform and entertain.  Whether you're looking for a video to promote your local club initiative, or to show during a presentation, RI has a great selection.  Click HERE for the YouTube RI page.
 

 
 
 
 
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textpolio

 Click here to donate any amount online!
 
 
 
 

Almost isn't good enough 
   Bruce Aylward: How we'll stop polio for good
    EXCELLENT video!

 

 
Rotary Int'l Insurance Information

The following Username and Password will be required to enter the Liability Insurance site.  The Username and Password are case sensitive.  The portal is for US clubs only.

Username:  Rotarian

Password:  Resources#1

• 2015 - 2016 Letter to Insured U.S. Rotary Clubs and Districts

General Liability Insurance Summary

• Request for Liability Certificate of Insurance

• Directors & Officers/Employment Practices Liability Insurance Summary

 

Come Join Us

Inspired by the work of Rotary International

When I see a need, I like to lend a hand.
We all need someone to understand.
That there are people in this world
Who really need us now.  
It's up to each of us to figure out how.

We are calling out around the world,
"Come Join Us!"
There is work for you and me.
We are building communities
and bridging continents
All around ... all around ... the world.

When I hear the call, "Service above self."
It's just not a slogan on my office shelf.
It's the way I choose to live.
The hand I have to give.
Thankful for the chance to give of myself.

We are calling out around the world,
"Come Join Us!"
There is work for you and me.
We are building communities
and bridging continents
All around ... all around ... the world.

Repeat Chorus ...
We are calling out around the world,
"Come Join Us!"

Words & music copyright 2010 Jerry Mills
Reprinted with permission
http://www.jerrymills.com 

 Click here for a lyric sheet and
information about the song.