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Club Information

Welcome to our Club!

Fort Wayne

Service Above Self

We meet Mondays at 12:00 PM
Parkview Field
1301 Ewing St
Corner of Ewing and Breckenridge
Fort Wayne, IN  46802
United States
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Students and Parents Wanting to Learn More Rotary International’s Study Abroad Program are Invited to the Allen County Public Library (Main Building) Sept. 11 • 7 p.m.

Fort Wayne, Ind. – The local clubs of Rotary International are hosting an open house for high school students interested in learning more about studying abroad. The event will be held at the Allen County Library (main building) at 7 p.m. on September 11. Here, students will learn about the Rotary’s year-long study abroad program to more than 60 countries, the application and interview process along with scholarship opportunities.

The Rotary Youth Exchange program provides students with an educational experience, room and board, one year of high school equivalent-level education and a monthly allowance for incidentals along with opportunities for travel and activities.

This year, three Allen County high school students, Maggie Blackwell, Sophia Lahey and Mackenzie Riley were selected as 2014-2015 Rotary International Exchange Students.

Rotarian Dick Conklin, who helps coordinate the exchange program, said the experience can help students gain knowledge of another language, grow as an individual and broaden their horizons.

“Students leave as kids and come back as mature individuals,” Conklin said. “Rotary’s exchange program is a platform that creates tomorrow’s leaders. These students learn about different cultures and languages while growing as individuals.”

 

 
 

Fort Wayne, Indiana – On Thursday, September 4, 2014 from 5:00 to 6:30 pm, the Back-to-School festivities at Bloomingdale Elementary School at 1300 Orchard Street will include the installation of a Little Free Library, along with a flower show, annual Title I meeting, and treats.

Based on the concept of “Take a book, Return a book,” the free-standing Little Free Library structures provide a way to share books freely throughout the community to promote literacy, to foster fellowship, and to enhance the quality of life for all citizens. This installation marks the 34th Little Free Library sponsored by the Rotary Club of Fort Wayne, and is part of a year-long celebration to commemorate the Club’s 100th anniversary by installing 100 Little Free Libraries in the community.

The Little Free Library being installed at Bloomingdale Elementary was built and decorated by Sarah Boys, school librarian, and her fiancé Adam Vetter. Ms. Boys will be on hand during Back-to-School at Bloomingdale Elementary to hand out flyers to parents and children, explaining how the library works. “The Little Free Library will be filled with books for both children and adults,” she said. “The purpose is to encourage life-long literacy in the community.”

Media are welcome and encouraged to attend the unveiling to interview the organizers and take photos of the event.

 

 
 

Building Community, Fostering Fellowship, and Promoting Literacy

Fort Wayne, Indiana – On Monday, September 8, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. the Rotary Club of Fort Wayne (also known as the Downtown Rotary) and the Fort Wayne Fire Department will unveil a Little Free Library™ at Fire Station #11 at 405 E. Rudisill Blvd. Chief Eric Lahey will be on hand at the installation and dedication of the Little Free Library.

The library kit was donated by Lancia Homes. It was painted and decorated by the firefighters of Fire Station #11. It is the second of five Little Free Library structures the Fort Wayne Fire Department plans to install this year. It is the 35th of 100 that will be sponsored by the Rotary Club of Fort Wayne to commemorate the Club’s 100th anniversary.

Based on the concept of “Take a book, Return a book,” the free-standing Little Free Library structures provide a way to share books freely throughout the community to promote literacy, to foster fellowship, and to enhance the quality of life for all citizens.

 

 
 

Our own Dick Conklin wrote this insightful and informative commentary for the Journal-Gazette about the opportunities and deep responsibilities one assumes in sponsoring an exchange student. Dick, you did us proud!  

http://www.journalgazette.net/article/20140907/EDIT07/309079988/0/SEARCH 

 

 
 

Speakers

Sep 22, 2014
Sep 29, 2014
Oct 06, 2014
Mike Crabill
District 6540 Rotary International Foundation
Oct 13, 2014
Rebecca Karcher, City of Fort Wayne
Housing in the Heart of the City
Oct 20, 2014
Tim Borne, Ash Agency
The Single County Executive Referendum
Oct 27, 2014
Dr. Deborah McMahan
The Health Status of Children in Allen County
Nov 03, 2014
Kelly Updike
Embassy Theater Renovation
Nov 10, 2014
Dr. Daniel Bradley
President of Indiana State University
Nov 17, 2014
Matt Kelly
One Lucky Guitar
Nov 24, 2014
Dr. Eric Schreier, M.D.
Pain Management nad Prescription Drugs
 
 

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