Vestavia Hills Rotary Club

Vestavia Hills, AL  35216

Speakers

Sep 04, 2015
Sep 11, 2015
Roy Williams
From Tragedy to Triumph
Sep 18, 2015
Ryan Waguespack
Private aviation
Sep 25, 2015
Jack Hausen
Shepherd's Fold
Oct 02, 2015
Rich Adams
John Pelham and the Civil War
Oct 09, 2015
Young Boozer
Alabama State Treasurer
Oct 16, 2015
TBD
Oct 23, 2015
Kent Howard
Iron City update
Nov 06, 2015
Dr. Neal Berte
Servant Leadership
Nov 13, 2015
Don Wilson
Veteran's Day Program
Nov 20, 2015
TBD
Nov 27, 2015
Dec 11, 2015
Dec 25, 2015
Jan 01, 2016
Feb 05, 2016
Ogie Shaw
American and Childhood Obesity
Feb 12, 2016
TBD
Valentine Program
 
 
 
 

Club Information

Welcome to our Club!

Vestavia Hills

Service Above Self

We meet Fridays at 12:00 PM
Vestavia Hills Board of Education
1204 Montgomery Highway
Vestavia Hills, AL  35216
United States
DistrictSiteIcon
District Site
VenueMap
Venue Map
 

TeachApp2010 034

Vestavia Hills Rotary Club Teachers of the Year 2010

Pictured from Left to Right:  Denise Brundege (Vestavia High School), Pay Ogle (Pizitz), Angie Amrine (Cahaba Heights Elementary), Jonathon Jeff (Liberty Park Middle School), Judy Stopplebein (Vestavia East). Jan Montgomery (Liberty Park Elementary), Catherine Hicks (Vestavia West), Adrian Smith (Vestavia Central).

 
 

Home Page Stories

 

BIRMINGHAM, Alabama — Greg Jeane, who retired in 2007 as a professor of geography at Samford University, taught classes about Africa for 15 years at Auburn University and then for 18 years at Samford.

He always hoped he’d get a chance to travel there one day. “To me it was always one of the most intriguing areas of the world,” he said.

Jeane went to Africa for the first time in 2003, on a mission trip with members of Independent Presbyterian Church, which he attends.

He’s now been to Africa 11 times. Most recently, he attended a Jan. 9 dedication for a school he planned and coordinated construction for in the village of Sikuzu, Zambia. “There were 70 children there for the dedication,” said Jeane, who returned last Saturday.

The children will start attending school there when it opens next month, he said.

“It’s been an amazing journey,” Jeane said. “The opportunity just fell in my lap.”

Jeane was attending a wedding in Atlanta in August 2010, a day before he was scheduled to leave on a trip to Africa.

A new three-classroom cinder block school will open next month in the remote African village of Sikuzu, Zambia. (Greg Jeane)

A relative of a friend became interested in his discussion of the mission work in the village of Mwandi, Zambia.

“I had never met him, but he was a successful commercial developer in Baltimore,” Jeane said. “We chatted two and a half hours over lunch.”

The businessman expressed an interest in funding a worthy project in Zambia and asked Jeane to report back to him on the most pressing needs in the region. “I talked to everybody in the village about what the most critical need in the village was, and it was education,” Jeane said. “Education is the key to everything there.”

Jeane told the donors that the construction of a school would cost $40,000. Within six weeks, Matthias and Rosetta DeVito, their DeVito Family Trust, and DeVito’s nephew, Frank Timlin and his wife, Neenah, had donated the cost of the project.

Jeane then went about raising additional funds to add items like classroom furniture, latrines, a water system and solar panels to provide power in the village that has no electricity.

The Rotary Club, Vestavia Hills High School and Jeane’s current fellow employees at Barnes & Noble contributed to the project.

The village of Sikuzu is on the Zambezi River, 90 miles above Victoria Falls. Up until now, children in that area who wanted to attend primary school had to walk five miles through the bush to Mwandi, the home village of the Lozi tribal chief. “That’s a 10-mile trek every day for 6-year-olds, and it’s not always safe,” Jeane said.

Opportunity to learn

Now they can attend through fifth grade in their own village, and continue their education in sixth grade at Mwandi when they are more able to make the trip. A five-mile walk is common at that age, he said.

“Everyone walks everywhere,” he said.

Zambia’s National Ministry of Education provided specifications for the three-room, cinder-block building and will provide a head teacher and curriculum. The village will provide assistants for the teacher.

“To go to that part of the world, it’s a real gut check on who you are and where you are in life,” Jeane said. “These people have nothing, no resources, no skills, no education. They live in mud huts and have no clean water. They get their drinking water from the Zambezi River, which is hideously polluted. They’re acclimated to the bacteria. You see people surviving with absolutely nothing. And yet they have a joy about them that is hard to understand.”

Several years ago, Jeane nearly died on one of his mission trips. He believes he inadvertently consumed contaminated water as part of a meal there.

“I have never been so sick in my life,” he said. He had to be flown for emergency treatment in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Still, Zambia remains a treasured place for Jeane. The people of Sikuzu, many of them Christians, gather to worship in a small mud hut chapel that was built by mission teams from Independent Presbyterian.

“I’ve been privileged to travel widely,” Jeane said. “Africa is the most rewarding place I have been. It’s changed my life.”

 

 

 
 

The president of Rotary International expects polio to be gone by 2013, as the organization continues its efforts to eradicate the disease, he said during a Birmingham visit today.

Kalyan Banerjee -- a member of Rotary since 1972 -- is a director of United Phosphorus Limited, the largest Indian agrochemical manufacturer. He's also the chair of United Phosphorus (Bangladesh) Limited. Banerjee, who spoke at the Rotary Club of Birmingham's weekly luncheon at the Harbert Center, focused his speech on Rotary's efforts to rid the world of debilitating disease around the world. Four countries remain in which polio is still endemic: India, Afghanistan, Pakistan and Nigeria, he said.

In June of this year, the New England Journal of Medicine published a paper explaining a vision for a post-polio era, he said. So far this year there have been 358 cases of polio worldwide, Banerjee said. Last year there were 638 cases.

"Thirty years ago, such a paper would be laughed out into the hall by a review board," he told the Rotarians. "It would have been nothing but science fiction. today it is where we are and where the world is."

 

 
 
ClubRunner Mobile App Now Available!
 
 
We're very excited to announce that the ClubRunner Mobile App is now available for download!  Released on May 4, 2011, the ClubRunner Mobile App is your key to connect to your ClubRunner website on the go! Completely, free to download and use, this app will let you do what you need to run your club effectively while you're on the go. Password protected just like your website, the ClubRunner Mobile app is comprised of 3 main modules.You now will have the ability to view your member directory, view the articles posted to your website and locate the nearest club right from your iPhone or iPod, bringing you even closer to being able to connect, collaborate and communicate
 
To download the app from the Apple App Store, simply type in 'ClubRunner' in the search bar. Our mobile app is compatible with all versions of the iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch sets that have iOS 3.1 or later.
 
Released as Version 1.1, the app currently features the following modules:
 
 
Member Directory
 
Immediately view the most up to date member directory, upon login. You can browse your member profiles which give you the necessary contact information you need to connect with just one click. Make a call to any of their phone numbers, email them directly from your iPhone, or even add them to your iPhone/iPod contacts.
 
View Posts on Your Website
 
View the latest feed of home page stories that are on your website, directly on your phone, so you never miss any information!
 
Club Locator
 
Based on your current geographic location, ClubRunner’s Club Locator will instantly show you a map to visually locate the closest clubs near you. Click on a drop pin to expand and view more information on the club, including their meeting day and time and address. Perfect for doing makeups anywhere in the world!
 
                    
 
      
  

We would love to hear your thoughts about our app. To provide us with feedback, please e-mail feedback@clubrunner.ca.

 

Currently only available for the iPhone, iPod and iPad sets, we will also be releasing the ClubRunner Mobile App for Blackberry and Android phones in the near future. Please note that the Stories and Members features are only available to clubs that are direct subscribers of ClubRunner. The Club Locator is available to all.

 

 

 
 

For many years now the Vestavia Rotary Club has honored many of the men and women who teach our children in Vestavia.  On Friday, November 19th eight of those individuals were recognized during a lunch honoring their service.  Photos of the event can be viewed in the photo journals section of the website.

 

 
 

The RI Foundation Two-for-One Benefit for the Polio Plus Challenge has been extended until October 29, 2010.  See message from RI below.  Remember, the website address to make your donation is www.rotary.org/contribute.  You must made a donation of at least $100 to be eligible for RI and VH Rotary matching points.

 
 
 
 
 

Club Executives & Directors

President
President Elect
Secretary
Treasurer
Vice-President
Immediate Past President
Club Administration
Membership
Public Relations
Parliamentarian
Sergeant at Arms
Iron City Chef
The Rotary Foundation
 
 

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Illiteracy traps adults, and their families, in poverty
Around the world, millions of adults are unable to read or write, and therefore struggle to earn a living for themselves and their families. Even in the United States, with its considerable resources, there are 36 million adults who can’t read better than the average third-grader, according to the international nonprofit ProLiteracy. In Detroit, Michigan, a widely cited 2003 survey conducted by the National Institute for Literacy found that almost half of residents over age 16 were functionally illiterate -- unable to use reading, speaking, writing, and computer skills in everyday life....
 

Speakers

Sep 04, 2015
Sep 11, 2015
Roy Williams
From Tragedy to Triumph
Sep 18, 2015
Ryan Waguespack
Private aviation
Sep 25, 2015
Jack Hausen
Shepherd's Fold
Oct 02, 2015
Rich Adams
John Pelham and the Civil War
Oct 09, 2015
Young Boozer
Alabama State Treasurer
Oct 16, 2015
TBD
Oct 23, 2015
Kent Howard
Iron City update
Nov 06, 2015
Dr. Neal Berte
Servant Leadership
Nov 13, 2015
Don Wilson
Veteran's Day Program
Nov 20, 2015
TBD
Nov 27, 2015
Dec 11, 2015
Dec 25, 2015
Jan 01, 2016
Feb 05, 2016
Ogie Shaw
American and Childhood Obesity
Feb 12, 2016
TBD
Valentine Program